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They are working on a Jurassic dino to walk the earth once again
#21
(09-07-2021, 06:38 PM)F2d5thCav Wrote:
Quote:The research team analysed a total of 538 amber samples from well-known amber deposits worldwide, with the oldest samples being approximately 220 million years old and recovered from the Dolomites in Italy.
The team also compared fossil amber with modern resins to test the validity of the data.

The results of this comprehensive study suggest that atmospheric oxygen during most of the past 220 million years was considerably lower than today's 21 per cent.

"We suggest numbers between 10 and 15 per cent," said Tappert.

https://www.firstpost.com/tech/news-anal...41691.html

No idea if that would bother beasts or not.  Yeah, lots more CO2 back then; the woke crowd would have been beside themselves with outrage!

Cheers

Yes I have been hearing the 15% studies too. There are also studies that say 30% 300 million years ago thus the super large insects. If it is true about the 15% figure then the dino's had very efficient lungs as the birds do today. I can see a big drop in oxygen after the impact 65mya and extinction due to fires and volcanic eruptions.


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#22
(09-07-2021, 10:26 PM)727Sky Wrote:
(09-07-2021, 06:38 PM)F2d5thCav Wrote:
Quote:The research team analysed a total of 538 amber samples from well-known amber deposits worldwide, with the oldest samples being approximately 220 million years old and recovered from the Dolomites in Italy.
The team also compared fossil amber with modern resins to test the validity of the data.

The results of this comprehensive study suggest that atmospheric oxygen during most of the past 220 million years was considerably lower than today's 21 per cent.

"We suggest numbers between 10 and 15 per cent," said Tappert.

https://www.firstpost.com/tech/news-anal...41691.html

No idea if that would bother beasts or not.  Yeah, lots more CO2 back then; the woke crowd would have been beside themselves with outrage!

Cheers

Yes I have been hearing the 15% studies too. There are also studies that say 30% 300 million years ago thus the super large insects. If it is true about the 15% figure then the dino's had very efficient lungs as the birds do today. I can see a big drop in oxygen after the impact 65mya and extinction due to fires and volcanic eruptions.



The Carboniferous ran from 360 million to 300 million years ago, and had the 30% oxygen levels you mention. At the end of it, the coal swamps died in the Carboniferous Rain Forest collapse (my guess would be due to falling CO2 levels as the plants got too efficient at removing it, a sort of suicide for the plants via greed), and when those died, great masses of oxygen ceased to be produced, so the levels fell in the atmosphere. Most of the following Permian period had desert conditions and low oxygen.

Bugs have book lungs that the air accesses through spiracles in their sides, so higher oxygen levels helped them grow to greater size. Coal swamps around here (but "here" was at the equator at the time due to continental drift), had foot long cockroaches and 8 foot long centipedes named "Arthropleura" roaming in the swamps and forests. Coal miners sometimes find Arthropleura trackways in the shale between coal seams here when they remove it to get at the coal. Dragonflies, named "Meganeura", had wingspans up to 3 feet. It was a time of giant bugs, and giant amphibians to eat them. Some salamanders got up to 8 to 10 feet long.

Reptilian lizards began in those days, but were tiny things, not more than 8 inches to a foot long.

When all that oxygen and CO2 went away, so did the giant bugs and the critters that ate them, and reptiles took over the Earth starting in the Permian and Triassic. Oxygen levels may have had a lot to do with that, as the creatures with inefficient respiratory systems could no longer rely on vast quantities of oxygen, so creatures with lungs better adapted for efficiency took over when levels were low, in the 15% range, I would think.

All that "climate change", and nary an SUV in sight! It's just the way of the planet, the vagaries of time. The age of one sort of life may end when those conditions are ended by nature, but that just makes room for the next.

.
“The nature of psychological compulsion is such that those who act under constraint remain under the impression that they are acting on their own initiative. The victim of mind-manipulation does not know that he is a victim. To him the walls of his prison are invisible, and he believes himself to be free. That he is not free is apparent only to other people.”

-Aldous Huxley

-- Got mask? Just sayin'...




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#23
(09-08-2021, 12:48 AM)Ninurta Wrote:
(09-07-2021, 10:26 PM)727Sky Wrote:
(09-07-2021, 06:38 PM)F2d5thCav Wrote:
Quote:The research team analysed a total of 538 amber samples from well-known amber deposits worldwide, with the oldest samples being approximately 220 million years old and recovered from the Dolomites in Italy.
The team also compared fossil amber with modern resins to test the validity of the data.

The results of this comprehensive study suggest that atmospheric oxygen during most of the past 220 million years was considerably lower than today's 21 per cent.

"We suggest numbers between 10 and 15 per cent," said Tappert.

https://www.firstpost.com/tech/news-anal...41691.html

No idea if that would bother beasts or not.  Yeah, lots more CO2 back then; the woke crowd would have been beside themselves with outrage!

Cheers

Yes I have been hearing the 15% studies too. There are also studies that say 30% 300 million years ago thus the super large insects. If it is true about the 15% figure then the dino's had very efficient lungs as the birds do today. I can see a big drop in oxygen after the impact 65mya and extinction due to fires and volcanic eruptions.



The Carboniferous ran from 360 million to 300 million years ago, and had the 30% oxygen levels you mention. At the end of it, the coal swamps died in the Carboniferous Rain Forest collapse (my guess would be due to falling CO2 levels as the plants got too efficient at removing it, a sort of suicide for the plants via greed), and when those died, great masses of oxygen ceased to be produced, so the levels fell in the atmosphere. Most of the following Permian period had desert conditions and low oxygen.

Bugs have book lungs that the air accesses through spiracles in their sides, so higher oxygen levels helped them grow to greater size. Coal swamps around here (but "here" was at the equator at the time due to continental drift), had foot long cockroaches and 8 foot long centipedes named "Arthropleura" roaming in the swamps and forests. Coal miners sometimes find Arthropleura trackways in the shale between coal seams here when they remove it to get at the coal. Dragonflies, named "Meganeura", had wingspans up to 3 feet. It was a time of giant bugs, and giant amphibians to eat them. Some salamanders got up to 8 to 10 feet long.

Reptilian lizards began in those days, but were tiny things, not more than 8 inches to a foot long.

When all that oxygen and CO2 went away, so did the giant bugs and the critters that ate them, and reptiles took over the Earth starting in the Permian and Triassic. Oxygen levels may have had a lot to do with that, as the creatures with inefficient respiratory systems could no longer rely on vast quantities of oxygen, so creatures with lungs better adapted for efficiency took over when levels were low, in the 15% range, I would think.

All that "climate change", and nary an SUV in sight! It's just the way of the planet, the vagaries of time. The age of one sort of life may end when those conditions are ended by nature, but that just makes room for the next.

.
Well written and well said..
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#24
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geological..._of_oxygen


Quote:Since the start of the Cambrian period, atmospheric oxygen concentrations have fluctuated between 15% and 35% of atmospheric volume.[10] The maximum of 35% was reached towards the end of the Carboniferous period (about 300 million years ago), a peak which may have contributed to the large size of insects and amphibians at that time.


.
“The nature of psychological compulsion is such that those who act under constraint remain under the impression that they are acting on their own initiative. The victim of mind-manipulation does not know that he is a victim. To him the walls of his prison are invisible, and he believes himself to be free. That he is not free is apparent only to other people.”

-Aldous Huxley

-- Got mask? Just sayin'...




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