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A funny language thing
#1
Back in the 70s is when I witnessed this. Darling is a sign of affection... Doc ling is monkey's butt hole..

There was a rather short American who had the hots for a girl who worked in a bar. She did not like short guys.. He would always go to the bar and try to chat her up and even buy her drinks. He did not speak Thai.. Every time he would see her he would of course say hello and try and get her to go with him.

"Hello Mia" he would say.

"Hello Doc ling" she would say and with the accent he never knew.. I never told him and to my knowledge no one else did either.  She never went with him for the year that I know of no matter how much money he offered.

I call many of my caddies doc ling as it is an inside joke just as several always say Saw Wat Dee Doc ling to me..

Language of sound alikes can be amusing IMO
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#2
In German, "thanks a lot" is danke schön.

GI's rendered it as "donkey shorts"

Another GI favorite of mine sounded like oopgefucht, a made-up word that sounded kind of German and meant "f'd up".  tinylaughing

Cheers
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Location: The lost world, Elsewhen
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#3
Yes in Chinese is 是的 Shi de it is often said by Americans as Shit Da

No is 不 Bu Americans will say Boooooooooo.

Fuckedup is 搞砸了 Gǎo zále Americans say Godzila 

You have to actually hear the words spoken in Chinese to understand the familiarity in sound.
Once A Rogue, Always A Rogue!
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#4
(07-18-2021, 05:56 PM)guohua Wrote: Yes in Chinese is 是的 Shi de it is often said by Americans as Shit Da

I guess 'Shi de'  has a similar sound and meaning in our lingo - "Shit aye"

Can be an exclamation of surprise (spoken in a higher pitch and generally with a grin) but can also be an affirmative when agreeing that something went wrong (Said in a lower tone with a serious look).

Kind regards and positive thoughts,

Bally:)
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#5
In my neck-of-the-woods, standard English hit the wall of Big Gordi's dialect and many expressions
changed. Such like:

How ya deein’. -Are you well?
Canny. -Friendly.
Gannin’. -Going.
Hinny, Pet, Marra -Friend.
Hyem. [Pronounced Yam] -Home.
Geet -Large.
Walla -Queue.
Hoy. -Throw.
Pure Belta -Magnificent.
Gadgie -Male/Man.
Scran -Food.
Bait.  -Food.
Scratcha. -Bed.
Radgie- Cross, Angry.
Owa [Pronounced How-a] -Over.
Haddaway, man -You must be joking.
Netty. -Toilet/Bathroom.
Whey aye, man -Of course.
Knackered -Tired.
Clamming -Hungry.
Spelk. -Splinter of wood.
Bairn. -Child.

There's plenty more!
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"They watch from behind complacent smiles whilst polishing their cutlery. Yet, with egg between the prongs"
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#6
(07-18-2021, 10:03 PM)BIAD Wrote: In my neck-of-the-woods, standard English hit the wall of Big Gordi's dialect and many expressions
changed. Such like:


Scran -Food.

There's plenty more!

Scran is an interesting one for me.  In Aussie navy terms it's an acronym for "Shit Cooked by the Royal Australian Navy".  I believe and if memory serves me correct the real term comes from RN years ago meaning an issue of "Sultanas, Currents, Raisins and Nuts" to the crew in rough weather or trying times.  Saved firing up the galley.  The 'head' (ship's dunny) was busy afterwards.

Kind regards,

Bally:)
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#7
Explanation: ...

Aussie Slanguage: 125+ Australian Slang Words & Phrases


Quote:125+ Australian Slang Words & Phrases
  1. A Cold One – Beer
  2. Accadacca – How Aussies refer to Australian band ACDC
  3. Ankle Biter – Child
  4. Arvo – Afternoon (S’Arvo – this afternoon!)
  5. Aussie Salute – Wave to scare the flies
  6. Avo – Avocado
  7. Bail – To cancel plans. ‘Bruce bailed’ = Bruce isn’t going to turn up.
  8. Barbie – Barbecue
  9. Bathers – Swimsuit
  10. Beauty! – Great! Most often exclaimed as “You Beauty”
  11. Billabong – A pond in a dry riverbed
  12. Billy – Teapot (In the Outback on the fire)
  13. Bloody – Very. Used to extenuate a point
  14. Bloody oath – yes or its true. “You right mate?”… “Bloody Oath”
  15. Bludger – Someone who’s lazy, generally also who relies on others (when it’s someone who relies on the state they’re often called a ‘dole bludger’)
  16. Bogan – This word is used for people who are, well let’s say, rednecks. Or, if you like, just call your friends a bogan when they are acting weird.
  17. Booze Bus – Police vehicle used to catch drunk drivers
  18. Bottle-O – Bottle Shop, basically a place to buy alcohol
  19. Brekky – Breakfast
  20. Brolly – Umbrella
  21. Bruce – An Aussie Bloke
  22. Buckleys Chance – little chance (Buckley’s Chance Wiktionary)
  23. Budgie Smugglers – Speedos
  24. Buggered – Exhausted
  25. Bush – “Out in the bush” – “he’s gone bush” In the countryside away from civilisation
  26. Cab Sav – Cabernet Sauvignon
  27. Cactus – Dead, Broken
  28. Choc A Bloc – Full
  29. Choccy Biccy – Chocolate Biscuit
  30. Chook – Chicken
  31. Chrissie – Christmas
  32. Ciggy – a Cigarette
  33. Clucky – feeling maternal
  34. Cobber – Very good friend. ‘Alright me ‘ol cobber’.
  35. Coldie – Beer. ‘Come over for a few coldie’s mate.’
  36. Coppers – Policemen
  37. Crack the shits – Getting angry at someone or something
  38. Crikey – an expression of surprise
  39. Crook – Being ill or angry; ‘Don’t go crook on me for getting crook’
  40. C*nt, the “C” word – Used when exchanging pleasantries between close friends or family member. If someone calls you the “C” word in Australia (and you haven’t done anything to make them angry), then breathe a sigh of relief… it means you have entered the mate zone.
  41. Dag – Someone who’s a bit of a nerd or geek.
  42. Daks – Trousers. ‘Tracky daks’ = sweatpants (tracksuit pants)
  43. Dardy – meaning “cool”, is used amongst South West Australian Aboriginal peoples and has also been adopted by non-indigenous teens. – wikipedia
  44. Deadset – True
  45. Defo – Definitely
  46. Devo – Devastated
  47. Drongo – a Fool, ‘Don’t be a drongo mate’
  48. Dunny – Toilet
  49. Durry – Cigarette
  50. Esky – An insulated container that keeps things cold (usually beers)
  51. Facey – Facebook
  52. Fair Dinkum – ‘Fair Dinkum?’ … ‘Fair Dinkum!’ = Honestly? … Yeah honestly!
  53. Flannie / Flanno – flannelette shirt
  54. Flat out – Really busy – “Flat out like a lizard drinking” – As busy as a bee
  55. Footy – Football (AFL / Aussie Rules)
  56. Frothy – Beer
  57. F*ck Me Dead – that’s unfortunate, that surprises me
  58. Furphy – rumours or stories that are improbable or absurd
  59. G’day – Hello
  60. Galah – an Australian cockatoo with a reputation for not being bright, hence a galah is also a stupid person.
  61. Gnarly – awesome – often used by surfers
  62. Going off – busy, lots of people / angry person “he’s going off”
  63. Good On Ya – Good work
  64. Goon – the best invention ever produced by mankind. Goon is a cheap, boxed wine that will inevitably become an integral part of your Australian backpacking experience.
  65. Hard yakka – Hard work
  66. Heaps – loads, lots, many
  67. Hoon – Hooligan (normally driving badly!)
  68. Iffy – bit risky or unreasonable
  69. Knickers – female underwear
  70. Lappy – Laptop
  71. Larrikin – Someone who’s always up for a laugh, bit of a harmless prankster
  72. Legless – Someone who is really drunk
  73. Lollies – Sweets
  74. Maccas – McDonalds
  75. Manchester – Sheets / Linen etc. If you’re from England, finding a department within a shop called Manchester could seriously confuse you.
  76. Mongrel – Someone who’s a bit of a dick
  77. Mozzie – Mosquito
  78. No Drama – No problem / it’s ok
  79. No Worries – No problem / it’s ok
  80. No Wucka’s – A truly Aussie way to say ‘no worries’
  81. Nuddy – Naked
  82. Outback – The interior of Australia, “The Outback” is more remote than those areas named “the bush”
  83. Pash – to kiss
  84. Piece of Piss – easy
  85. Piss Off – go away, get lost
  86. Piss Up – a party, a get together and in Australia – most social occasions
  87. Piss – (To Piss) to urinate
  88. Pissed – Intoxicated, Drunk
  89. Pissed Off – Annoyed
  90. Rack Off – The less offensive way to tell someone to ‘F Off’!
  91. Rapt – Very happy
  92. Reckon – for sure. ‘You Reckon?’… ‘I reckon!’
  93. Rellie / Rello – Relatives
  94. Ripper – ‘You little ripper’ = That’s fantastic mate!
  95. Root Rat – someone who enjoys sex (maybe a little too much)
  96. Rooted – Tired or Broken
  97. Runners – Trainers, Sneakers
  98. Sanger – Sandwich
  99. Servo – Service Station / Garage
  100. Shark biscuit – kids at the beach
  101. Sheila – A woman
  102. She’ll be apples – Everything will be alright
  103. Shoot Through – To leave
  104. Sick – awesome; ‘that’s really sick mate’
  105. Sickie – a sick day off work, or ‘to pull a sickie’ would be to take a day off when you aren’t actually sick
  106. Skull – To down a beer
  107. Slab – A carton of beers
  108. Smoko – Cigarette break
  109. Snag – Sausage
  110. Stiffy – Erection
  111. Stoked – Happy, Pleased
  112. Straya – Australia
  113. Strewth – An exclamation of surprise
  114. Stubby – a bottle of beer
  115. Stubby Holder – Used so your hands don’t get cold when holding your beer, or to stop your hands making your beer warm!
  116. Stuffed – Tired
  117. Sunnies – Sunglasses
  118. Swag – Single bed you can roll up, a bit like a sleeping bag.
  119. Tea – Dinner
  120. Tinny – Can of beer or small boat
  121. Thongs – Flip Flops. Do not be alarmed if your new found Australian friend asks you to wear thongs to the beach. They are most likely expressing their concern of the hot sand on your delicate feet.
  122. True Blue – Genuinely Australian
  123. Tucker – Food. ‘Bush Tucker’ tends to be food found in the Outback such as witchety grubs.
  124. Two Up – A gambling game played on Anzac day.
  125. U-IE – to take a U-Turn when driving
  126. Up Yourself – Stuck up
  127. Woop Woop – middle of nowhere “he lives out woop woop”
  128. Ya – You
  129. Yous – (youse) plural of you!





Personal Disclosure: Rack off ya bunch of gallahs! [SARCASM!]
"Eye kan speeka das engrish perphucktly ... eye joost kant tipe 4 shyte!" tinytongue 

minusculebeercheers
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#8
(07-19-2021, 12:22 AM)OmegaLogos Wrote: Explanation: ...

Aussie Slanguage: 125+ Australian Slang Words & Phrases



"Eye kan speeka das engrish perphucktly ... eye joost kant tipe 4 shyte!" tinytongue 

minusculebeercheers

I see 'rooted' in your list.  "Just had a root" can mean "Just stepped off a horizontal refreshment."  or "The missus let me have an empty."

and the saying "If that's fair dinkum, I'll stand (Standing up) rooting."  "Flamin wombat"  = "Eats, Roots and Leaves".

My thoughts,

Bally :)
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#9
(07-18-2021, 11:40 PM)Bally002 Wrote: Scran is an interesting one for me.  In Aussie navy terms it's an acronym for "Shit Cooked by the Royal Australian Navy".
I believe and if memory serves me correct the real term comes from RN years ago meaning an issue of "Sultanas, Currents, Raisins and Nuts"
to the crew in rough weather or trying times.  Saved firing up the galley.  The 'head' (ship's dunny) was busy afterwards...

Wow...! that's genuinely interesting. It makes one wonder what long-term effects such international communication
has on different languages -as well as English. There always seems to a pragmatic reason for an odd word that sadly,
gets lost in time.
Thank you.
.........................

In Omegalogo's list, I see many that seem to derive from the past in England, but there many that I'd presume are
unique to Australia.

'Bogan' -redneck or somebody acting oddly.
Could this be a corrupted version of the slang 'bogging', a term to mean smelly, left unkempt?
Maybe even a corruption of the word 'Bogle' -meaning scarecrow or another distorted Northumbrian word
from the colloquial title 'Boggart' derived from 'Bogie' or 'Bogie-man'.

I find this all this fascinating!

'Yakka' – work. Another rural term used in the past in areas of Britain that farmers often named for their act
of removing turnip leaves from the edible taproot. One 'yaks' a turnip with a small sickle.

Yous – (youse) plural of you. This expression is still used in the North-Eastern areas of England, but pronounced
as 'Yoose' to mean a collective.

It needs more looking into -methinks!
[Image: attachment.php?aid=953]
"They watch from behind complacent smiles whilst polishing their cutlery. Yet, with egg between the prongs"
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#10
(07-19-2021, 09:16 AM)BIAD Wrote:
(07-18-2021, 11:40 PM)Bally002 Wrote: Scran is an interesting one for me.  In Aussie navy terms it's an acronym for "Shit Cooked by the Royal Australian Navy".
I believe and if memory serves me correct the real term comes from RN years ago meaning an issue of "Sultanas, Currents, Raisins and Nuts"
to the crew in rough weather or trying times.  Saved firing up the galley.  The 'head' (ship's dunny) was busy afterwards...

Wow...! that's genuinely interesting. It makes one wonder what long-term effects such international communication
has on different languages -as well as English. There always seems to a pragmatic reason for an odd word that sadly,
gets lost in time.
Thank you.

I find the most interesting term in the Aboriginal Language is "Muckaty"  pronounced Muck-a-tee.  There is a cattle station named Muckaty station in central Australia.

'Muckaty' means in central Australian aboriginal terms "rifle' or "Firearm".  The term came from the west coast where the Dutch mariners landed or were ship wrecked late 1500's to early 1600's.  'Musket'.  I've met many a central Australian who carry on the genes.  Blonde Hair, Blue eyes and freckles in some upon their dark aboriginal skin.  Licencing being part of my duties years ago in central Aust meant I handed out some 'muckaty' licences.

Cheers,

Bally:)
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#11
(07-19-2021, 09:46 AM)Bally002 Wrote: I find the most interesting term in the Aboriginal Language is "Muckaty"  pronounced Muck-a-tee.
There is a cattle station named Muckaty station in central Australia.

'Muckaty' means in central Australian aboriginal terms "rifle' or "Firearm".  The term came from the west coast where the Dutch mariners landed or were ship wrecked late 1500's to early 1600's.  'Musket'.  I've met many a central Australian who carry on the genes.  Blonde Hair, Blue eyes and freckles in some upon their dark aboriginal skin.  Licencing being part of my duties years ago in central Aust meant I handed out some 'muckaty' licences...

If we assume the first part of the word 'Muck' derives from the shortening of the word 'musket', 'A-tee' must be a broken-down
expression of something else relevant to the area. Do you have any insight to what that may be?
minusculethumbsup
(Intrigued Pom asking!)
[Image: attachment.php?aid=953]
"They watch from behind complacent smiles whilst polishing their cutlery. Yet, with egg between the prongs"
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#12
(07-19-2021, 09:51 AM)BIAD Wrote:
(07-19-2021, 09:46 AM)Bally002 Wrote: I find the most interesting term in the Aboriginal Language is "Muckaty"  pronounced Muck-a-tee.
There is a cattle station named Muckaty station in central Australia.

'Muckaty' means in central Australian aboriginal terms "rifle' or "Firearm".  The term came from the west coast where the Dutch mariners landed or were ship wrecked late 1500's to early 1600's.  'Musket'.  I've met many a central Australian who carry on the genes.  Blonde Hair, Blue eyes and freckles in some upon their dark aboriginal skin.  Licencing being part of my duties years ago in central Aust meant I handed out some 'muckaty' licences...

If we assume the first part of the word 'Muck' derives from the shortening of the word 'musket', 'A-tee' must be a broken-down
expression of something else relevant to the area. Do you have any insight to what that may be?
minusculethumbsup
(Intrigued Pom asking!)

Think of Musketeer.  A soldier armed with a musket.  Combine that with a primitive language and one I am familiar with where pronunciation is kin to pidgin.  My thoughts that this was described in native terms musketeer =  Muckaty.  Kinda like a child copying speech.  There are many languages in aboriginal central Aussie but I knew 'Mackaty' or 'Muckatee' was common with the Warlpiri and Pintupi residing out there.
So a man armed and described as a musketeer would, to my way of thinking be decribed in those original people's term, who had no concept of foriegn language, as 'Mukaty'

Hope that helps.

Bally:)
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#13
(07-19-2021, 10:05 AM)Bally002 Wrote:
(07-19-2021, 09:51 AM)BIAD Wrote:
(07-19-2021, 09:46 AM)Bally002 Wrote: I find the most interesting term in the Aboriginal Language is "Muckaty"  pronounced Muck-a-tee.
There is a cattle station named Muckaty station in central Australia.

'Muckaty' means in central Australian aboriginal terms "rifle' or "Firearm".  The term came from the west coast where the Dutch mariners landed or were ship wrecked late 1500's to early 1600's.  'Musket'.  I've met many a central Australian who carry on the genes.  Blonde Hair, Blue eyes and freckles in some upon their dark aboriginal skin.  Licencing being part of my duties years ago in central Aust meant I handed out some 'muckaty' licences...

If we assume the first part of the word 'Muck' derives from the shortening of the word 'musket', 'A-tee' must be a broken-down
expression of something else relevant to the area. Do you have any insight to what that may be?
minusculethumbsup
(Intrigued Pom asking!)

Think of Musketeer.  A soldier armed with a musket.  Combine that with a primitive language and one I am familiar with where pronunciation is kin to pidgin.  My thoughts that this was described in native terms musketeer =  Muckaty.  Kinda like a child copying speech.  There are many languages in aboriginal central Aussie but I knew 'Mackaty' or 'Muckatee' was common with the Warlpiri and Pintupi residing out there.
So a man armed and described as a musketeer would, to my way of thinking be described in those original people's term, who had no concept of foreign language, as 'Muckaty'

Hope that helps.

Bally:)

Just adding.  Musketeer - Muskatee - couple of hundred years later might be - mucka tee.  Slang for Muskateer or whatever the  armed sailors called themselves in their language back then,  My thoughts.


[Image: Musketeer.jpg]

A dutch musketeer painted by Jacob van Gheyn in 1608

1608

Bally:)
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#14
(07-19-2021, 10:06 AM)Bally002 Wrote: Just adding.  Musketeer - Muskatee - couple of hundred years later might be - mucka tee.
Slang for Muskateer or whatever the  armed sailors called themselves in their language back then,  My thoughts.


[Image: Musketeer.jpg]

A dutch musketeer painted by Jacob van Gheyn in 1608...

minusculethumbsup
[Image: attachment.php?aid=953]
"They watch from behind complacent smiles whilst polishing their cutlery. Yet, with egg between the prongs"
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#15
(07-18-2021, 03:55 AM)727Sky Wrote: Back in the 70s is when I witnessed this. Darling is a sign of affection... Doc ling is monkey's butt hole..

There was a rather short American who had the hots for a girl who worked in a bar. She did not like short guys.. He would always go to the bar and try to chat her up and even buy her drinks. He did not speak Thai.. Every time he would see her he would of course say hello and try and get her to go with him.

"Hello Mia" he would say.

"Hello Doc ling" she would say and with the accent he never knew.. I never told him and to my knowledge no one else did either.  She never went with him for the year that I know of no matter how much money he offered.

I call many of my caddies doc ling as it is an inside joke just as several always say Saw Wat Dee Doc ling to me..

Language of sound alikes can be amusing IMO

This cracked me up and reminded me of my dear friend Flo. She is originally from the Philippines.

Flo is sweet, demure, and I never saw her get angry. We had another friend, her is Julia, and every other word out of Julia's mouth is the "F" word in some kind of dress, or just plain raw.

This day Flo got pissed. She said, "I am so mad I can't stand it." "Pock It!" "Just Pock It!" When I asked Flo what did she mean, she you know. "What Julia says all the time."

Of course "Pocket!", became my go to expletive.
[Image: attachment.php?aid=8192]




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#16
a business man went on a trip to thailand, a business associate met him at the airport and on the way back to the hotel told him he had set up a date for him with a escort, and a round of golf the next day.

the guy said great and was looking forward to both.

after he took the escort to diner and talking with her in his broken thai and her broken english they went up stairs and started getting busy. 

in the middle of it she started yelling something in her language , the guy thought yea yea she likes it and he started pumping harder and faster.

the next day on the golf course his business associate made a great hole in one shot. so he thought i'll impress him and use the words my date said.

so he repeated her words, his associate turned and looked at him and asked,

what do you mean wrong hole?Biggrin
"it seems to me, that i could live my life a lot better than i think i am"



the working man




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