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Dandelion tea blocks Covid spike protein
#1
This is an interesting study, the humble dandelion might save us all from the covid!  Maybe somebody with more herbal knowledge than me can weigh in on this? Mrs G?

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#2
If true, the rabbits in my yard are safe and healthy  tinybiggrin
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#3
Information on dandelion herbal uses from this page (red highlighting by me):

Quote:The 17th century British botanist, herbalist, and physician Nicholas Culpeper, in his Complete Herbal, wrote that dandelion leaf and root have an “opening and cleansing quality” and are effective for the promotion of urination; treatment of obstructions and diseases of the liver, gallbladder, and spleen; promotion of rest and sleep in fevered persons; cleansing and healing of abscesses and ulcers of the urinary passage; and assisting in generally poor health with emaciation.16 In England and Ireland, dandelion was once used almost as widely as elder (Sambucus nigra, Adoxaceae), nettles (Urtica dioica, Urticaceae), and dock (Rumex spp., Polygonaceae).17 Primary uses included the treatment of coughs, colds, and other respiratory problems; the increase of urine production; and “cleansing the blood” to address boils and other skin complaints. The milky latex was also used externally for wart removal.17 Dandelion was used in Ireland for cuts, diabetes, fractures, functional liver disorders, nervousness, dermatosis (noninflammatory skin disorders), sore eyes, sprains, swelling, thrush (an infection caused by the fungus Candida albicans), and tuberculosis.18

Dandelion has Persian and East Indian ethnobotanical uses as a mild laxative and appetite stimulant, and for the treatment of urinary problems, liver conditions, and digestive issues. It also has been used orally to treat snakebites and externally for wounds, boils, sprains, and swelling.19 Ethnobotanist James A. Duke, PhD, referring to Harold and Alma Moldenke’s Plants of the Bible (Chronica Botanica Company, 1952), suggests that dandelion may have been one of the bitter herbs of the Old Testament; that it is used in India as a hepatic stimulant and for dyspepsia, hepatitis, and jaundice; and that it is used in Lebanon as a laxative or purgative.18

Introduced and naturalized to parts of North America, various Native American tribes consumed dandelion greens for food and as a tonic to purify the blood; used a dandelion leaf poultice for slow-healing wounds, stomachache, and sore throat; drank a decoction or infusion of young leaves or flowers for menstrual cramps; drank a decoction or infusion of the roots for stomach pain, blood purification, to produce postpartum milk flow, as an emetic, and as an “anti-witch medicine” and “love medicine”; and used either the whole plant or an unspecified part of the plant as a “laxative-tonic,” for pain, anemia, liver spots, edema, kidney ailments, and smashed or swollen testicles.20

Early 19th century Eclectic physicians used dandelion root extract as a tonic, diuretic, and aperient (to relieve constipation); for conditions of the liver, spleen, and kidneys; and for edema.21 Additionally, a root extract was used as a cholagogue (to discharge bile); in chronic jaundice; for rheumatism, blood disorders, skin problems, mouth ulcers, and gastritis; and to stimulate the stomach.22The British Herbal Compendium described bitter (a medicinal substance that promotes appetite or digestion), mild laxative, and cholagogue effects, while the British Herbal Pharmacopoeia noted dandelion’s beneficial effect on the liver.23

Dandelion leaves have long been eaten as a spring green, usually when freshly sprouted, tender, and less bitter than older leaves. Dandelion is especially valued by the French who have turned cultivating choice salad varieties into an art.24 It is a good source of vitamins, minerals, and nutrients, particularly vitamins A and K, and potassium.25 It is widely believed that dandelion’s ability to replace potassium lost through diuresis is what makes it an effective diuretic, especially in cases of heart disease.26 In 1982, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposed the inclusion of dandelion root as a diuretic active ingredient in its establishment of a monograph for over-the-counter (OTC) drug products for dysmenorrhea.27 In 1988, in a subsequent “tentative final monograph” for OTC menstrual drug products, dandelion remained listed in category IIE, meaning that it was determined to be safe but lacked sufficient evidence of efficacy for the intended use.28 Four years later, the FDA proposed that dandelion should be classified as not generally recognized as safe and effective (GRASE) for use as a diuretic menstrual active ingredient and passed a final ruling to that effect in 1993.29,30 Following the passage of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA), the last remaining OTC drug products that had been labeled with dandelion as an active ingredient transitioned to the newly established dietary supplement framework.

And:

Quote:In vitro and animal studies have shown various dandelion preparations to be anti-inflammatory,45-48 anti-angiogenic (stops tumors from growing blood vessels, which is one way to impede tumor growth),45 antinociceptive (reduces sensitivity to pain),45 antitumor,49 antiproliferative (prevents or retards cell growth),50-52 antioxidant,47,52-54 cytotoxic,55 antiviral,56 antiretroviral,57 prebiotic,58 antimicrobial,54,59 and antibacterial.60,61 It has also been found to stimulate the secretion of insulin,54 induce apoptosis (programmed cell death) in dysfunctional cells (e.g., tumor cells),62-65 and inhibit lipid and triglyceride accumulation.66

The original article used dandelion tea brewed from dried leaves (not root), of 4 to 10g dried leaf infused into hot water, and suggested a dosage of 3x daily. It apparently inhibited the spike protein of all tested variants/strains of the covid virus from attaching to body cells (specifically lung and kidney cells) and cannibalizing them to create more virus. Also, covid virus is carried as a heavy load in the mucosa and oral cavities of infected persons, so oral consumption should prove effective at combating the virus if the study guidelines are followed, since it is taken orally. It acted within 30 seconds to inhibit spike protein attachment, and appears to have forced already attached virus to detach.

It also mentioned that testing was successful to a fairly high degree in a laboratory setting, and called for clinical trials to confirm the findings.

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My suggestion for collecting it would be to dig it up by the root (a small trowel should suffice to do that), then thread a needle and run the needle through the roots in batches to string them together, and hang them upside down in a warm, dry, dark place until they dry.

You'll want to gather enough that you've got roughly an ounce of leaves per day of use. Each dose is roughly 1/6 to 1/3 of an ounce of dried leaf in hot water and then steeped for several minutes. You can either strain out the greenies or chew 'em up and eat 'em.

As the year progresses, more compounds tend to collect in the roots of a growing dandelion, so root use can be problematic - you have to gauge it's strength by the time of year it was gathered in order to work out dosages. Might be why they used dried leaves in the study. The leaves become more bitter as the year progresses. Might want to add some honey to the tea to make it more palatable.

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“The nature of psychological compulsion is such that those who act under constraint remain under the impression that they are acting on their own initiative. The victim of mind-manipulation does not know that he is a victim. To him the walls of his prison are invisible, and he believes himself to be free. That he is not free is apparent only to other people.”

-Aldous Huxley

-- Got mask? Just sayin'...




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#4
Hubby is going to be so happy when I tell him to stop mowing the yard.   tinybiggrin

Our yard is full of dandelions!   minusculethumbsup
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#5
@WonderCow 

rom root to flower, dandelion are highly nutritious plants, loaded with vitamins, minerals and fiber.
Dandelion root is often dried and consumed as a tea but can also be eaten in its whole form.
 
In terms of nutritional content, the dandelion patch in your backyard can join the rankings with the rest of your vegetable garden.
Dandelion greens can be eaten cooked or raw and serve as an excellent source of vitamins A, C and K. They also contain vitamin E, folate and small amounts of other B vitamins.
The root of the dandelion is rich in the carbohydrate inulin, which is a type of Soluble Fiber found in plants that supports the growth and maintenance of a healthy bacterial flora in your intestinal tract.
So you can see it is the Vitamins that help to strengthen your immune system.

What do I use it for mainly?
To help support your body’s ability to fight infection.
The potential to prevent the growth of cancerous cells in many different organ systems.
Traditional herbal medicine utilizes dandelion to treat constipation and other symptoms of impaired digestion.
Dandelion have a protective effect on liver tissue in the presence of toxic substances and stress.

Best used dried out, the Roots, Leafs and Stems of the plant has the most Vitamins, the Flower Buds are best for teas or adding to a meal of red meat or fish or a Beef and Potato Stew.
I often boil the Roots and Stems and Leafs in mineral water and sell to my patients all ready in a QT jar so all they have to do is drink it.
For my patent's with High Blood Pressure, Diabetes and need to lose weight, I boil the Root, Stem and Leafs.
For people with Liver or Digestive problems, Chop and Dry the entire plant (root, stem and flower) and add to all your meals, even your morning eggs or hash-brown potatoes. 


[Image: %E8%92%B2%E5%85%AC%E8%8B%B1-tcm-shutters...quality=80] Making tea.

I hope this helped, my Traditional Chinese Medicine Book is in all mandarin Chinese but I do know this is a good book in English.


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#6
(06-26-2021, 03:09 PM)Ninurta Wrote: It also mentioned that testing was successful to a fairly high degree in a laboratory setting,
and called for clinical trials to confirm the findings...

What on earth for...? Why not just notify the public that it's a cure-all and only later, look at any side-effects
and then come up with official-sounding excuses.
tinyhuh

This worked for the vaccine-push!
tinysurprised
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"They watch from behind complacent smiles whilst polishing their cutlery. Yet, with egg between the prongs"
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#7
(06-26-2021, 05:21 PM)BIAD Wrote:
(06-26-2021, 03:09 PM)Ninurta Wrote: It also mentioned that testing was successful to a fairly high degree in a laboratory setting,
and called for clinical trials to confirm the findings...

What on earth for...? Why not just notify the public that it's a cure-all and only later, look at any side-effects
and then come up with official-sounding excuses.
tinyhuh

This worked for the vaccine-push!
tinysurprised

My best guess is that it's because they are actual scientists rather than drug manufacturers or government goons, so they have a conscience that got in the way.

Pesky consciences!

I've downloaded all the information I've been able to find on it so far, because I'm pretty sure it will disappear from the internet. Phizer can't rake in bucks if everyone is healing himself out of his own yard.

.
“The nature of psychological compulsion is such that those who act under constraint remain under the impression that they are acting on their own initiative. The victim of mind-manipulation does not know that he is a victim. To him the walls of his prison are invisible, and he believes himself to be free. That he is not free is apparent only to other people.”

-Aldous Huxley

-- Got mask? Just sayin'...




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#8
(06-26-2021, 05:30 PM)Ninurta Wrote:
(06-26-2021, 05:21 PM)BIAD Wrote:
(06-26-2021, 03:09 PM)Ninurta Wrote: It also mentioned that testing was successful to a fairly high degree in a laboratory setting,
and called for clinical trials to confirm the findings...

What on earth for...? Why not just notify the public that it's a cure-all and only later, look at any side-effects
and then come up with official-sounding excuses.
tinyhuh

This worked for the vaccine-push!
tinysurprised

My best guess is that it's because they are actual scientists rather than drug manufacturers or government goons, so they have a conscience that got in the way.

Pesky consciences!

I've downloaded all the information I've been able to find on it so far, because I'm pretty sure it will disappear from the internet. Phizer can't rake in bucks if everyone is healing himself out of his own yard.

.

My book on all the herbs and plants that can help heal came in the mail this week. It is a large 8.5 x 11 and has tons of information in it. I also got the digital copy as a bonus; didn't pay for that.  Some people prefer to read on a Kindle, but I like having the hard copy in case the internet goes down.
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#9
(06-26-2021, 05:40 PM)Mystic Wanderer Wrote: My book on all the herbs and plants that can help heal came in the mail this week. It is a large 8.5 x 11 and has tons of information in it. I also got the digital copy as a bonus; didn't pay for that.  Some people prefer to read on a Kindle, but I like having the hard copy in case the internet goes down.

Me too. I prefer hard copies in case the lights go out. Kids these days look at a book, though, and ask where the switch is to turn it on...

.
“The nature of psychological compulsion is such that those who act under constraint remain under the impression that they are acting on their own initiative. The victim of mind-manipulation does not know that he is a victim. To him the walls of his prison are invisible, and he believes himself to be free. That he is not free is apparent only to other people.”

-Aldous Huxley

-- Got mask? Just sayin'...




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#10
This part caught my eye:

Quote:More physiologically relevant in vitro experiments that were carried out by us showed that only short contact times with T. officinale extract were necessary for efficient blocking of SARS-CoV-2 spike binding or for removing already bound spike from the cell surface. 

Does this mean it would help people suffering side effects from being jabbed, as the spike proteins accumulating in organs is what is allegedly causing the damage?

Also, if jabs become mandatory, we can protect ourselves somewhat from from the worst effects?

P.S how do I get the text to show up?
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#11
(06-26-2021, 06:38 PM)WonderCow Wrote: This part caught my eye:

Quote:More physiologically relevant in vitro experiments that were carried out by us showed that only short contact times with T. officinale extract were necessary for efficient blocking of SARS-CoV-2 spike binding or for removing already bound spike from the cell surface. 

Does this mean it would help people suffering side effects from being jabbed, as the spike proteins accumulating in organs is what is allegedly causing the damage?

Also, if jabs become mandatory, we can protect ourselves somewhat from from the worst effects?

P.S how do I get the text to show up?

I fixed your quoted text for you. The way I read that, it doesn't say that it eliminates the spike proteins, just that it prevents spike binding, So I doubt it would help guard against the vaccine issues.

My solution for mandatory vaccination is that if they're gonna try to kill me, I'm gonna try to kill them right back. I never planned on living forever anyhow, but if I do, or alternatively in what time I have left, I'm gonna live on my terms, not terms dictated by someone who thinks they are my higher-up superior. Their chosen method of execution is Mengele-style medical experimentation, mine will be whatever I can get my hands on when they come for me. We'll see who comes out the other side still breathing. If I die, I die. either way I die on my terms, and unvaccinated.

I am no man's guinea pig.

.
“The nature of psychological compulsion is such that those who act under constraint remain under the impression that they are acting on their own initiative. The victim of mind-manipulation does not know that he is a victim. To him the walls of his prison are invisible, and he believes himself to be free. That he is not free is apparent only to other people.”

-Aldous Huxley

-- Got mask? Just sayin'...




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#12
Found this same one myself a short while ago.

Quote:SARS-CoV-2 is steadily mutating during continuous transmission among humans. This might eventually lead the virus into evading existing therapeutic and prophylactic approaches aimed at the viral spike. We found effective inhibition of protein-protein interaction between the human virus cell entry receptor ACE2 and SARS-CoV-2 spike, including five relevant mutations, by water-based common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) extracts. This was shown in vitro using human kidney (HEK293) and lung (A549) cells, overexpressing the ACE2 and ACE2/TMPRSS2 protein, respectively. Infection of the lung cells using SARS-CoV-2 pseudotyped lentivirus was efficiently prevented by the extract. The results deserve more in-depth analysis of dandelions’ effectiveness in SARS-CoV-2 prevention and now require confirmatory clinical evidence.

www.biorxiv.org
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#13
(06-26-2021, 06:38 PM)WonderCow Wrote: This part caught my eye:

Quote:More physiologically relevant in vitro experiments that were carried out by us showed that only short contact times with T. officinale extract were necessary for efficient blocking of SARS-CoV-2 spike binding or for removing already bound spike from the cell surface. 

Does this mean it would help people suffering side effects from being jabbed, as the spike proteins accumulating in organs is what is allegedly causing the damage?

Also, if jabs become mandatory, we can protect ourselves somewhat from from the worst effects?

P.S how do I get the text to show up?

Here Senonas Forum Guide Page @#2 and item #24 should answer your question I think.
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