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Current Electric Cars
#21
(08-15-2018, 10:59 PM)guohua Wrote: ...Here is a picture from the bedroom area of a 2009 386 Peterbilt.
Ours didn't have the extra bunk bed for a second driver, we had one full size bed, Refrigerator
and microwave and small closet space with storage under the bed and above. 

Great Scott! A veritable home-from-home!

When I was in my teens, I used to travel the UK with my friend in his little Mercedes flat-back truck.
It had no sleeping compartment -unless you count the seats and the floor!
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#22
(08-15-2018, 08:30 PM)guohua Wrote: @Wallfire 
My husband said it was the  Eaton Fuller 10 speed transmission.
He really liked it, in Texas, Nevada and Kansas late at night (03:00 am) he could be in high 10 and cruise at 85 MPH with a fully loaded 53 ft trailer. (No Speed Governor) on the Cummins, He thinks it was the Cummins ISX15 engine, Peterbilt did all our maintenance because of their Great Warranty on their tractor.
On the interstates and freeways he could shift on the fly (in his words) and not grind a gear.

We miss our truck, but the cost of the different licenses to haul all products and insurance and registration and the diesel prices was just to much to make good money. Fill up two 103 gallon tanks and travel 1000 or so miles is not good at $2.85 a gallon (price at the time roughly).

I once did a 4 day trip across Sweden in a lorry with a fuller gear box ( did the trip for a friend who wanted time with his wife,since I was on holidays from my teaching job I said ok ) Any way I know that all fuller gear boxes are made in hell, but this gear box was not only made in hell but made to Satan's own special specifications.

NEVER AGAIN
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#23
(08-16-2018, 03:01 PM)Wallfire Wrote:
(08-15-2018, 08:30 PM)guohua Wrote: @Wallfire 
My husband said it was the  Eaton Fuller 10 speed transmission.
He really liked it, in Texas, Nevada and Kansas late at night (03:00 am) he could be in high 10 and cruise at 85 MPH with a fully loaded 53 ft trailer. (No Speed Governor) on the Cummins, He thinks it was the Cummins ISX15 engine, Peterbilt did all our maintenance because of their Great Warranty on their tractor.
On the interstates and freeways he could shift on the fly (in his words) and not grind a gear.

We miss our truck, but the cost of the different licenses to haul all products and insurance and registration and the diesel prices was just to much to make good money. Fill up two 103 gallon tanks and travel 1000 or so miles is not good at $2.85 a gallon (price at the time roughly).

I once did a 4 day trip across Sweden in a lorry with a fuller gear box ( did the trip for a friend who wanted time with his wife,since I was on holidays from my teaching job I said ok ) Any way I know that all fuller gear boxes are made in hell, but this gear box was not only made in hell but made to Satan's own special specifications.

NEVER AGAIN
Hi, Fellow Professional Driver @Wallfire  Mr. G. here.

The trick to a Fuller, is Never, Ever Depress the Clutch over half way down or all the way to the floor board,
I was shown by an old driver at a truck stop in Flagstaff, Az. called, Little America Truck Stop my first or second day with my new truck.
He heard my complaining to my wife about shifting and he came over and explained to me that you only Depress The Clutch Pedal when you are in the Proper RPM Range and then only about 1/4 or Two Inches down and shift before your RPM's drop to much. If your drop the clutch to the floor board then your RPM's have time to drop and you'll have trouble getting in the gear.

I found this to work GREAT! As a matter of fact I'd run the RPM's up just a little over and shift just as I removed my foot from the Throttle Pedal With Out The Clutch!
The only time I ever really had to use the clutch was in the city, I could hit an off ramp and down shift to the stop sign or red light without ever using the clutch. 
Of course in the Mountains and steep grades with a different matter, I'd engage my Jake Brake (engine brake) as soon as I hit the hills and mountains or major traffic on interstates and highways.
Using the jake Brake cause the engine to lose RPM's so quickly I had to use the clutch.

Driving a lorry Truck would stange to me, Looking right out over the windshield to the ground.
Once A Rogue, Always A Rogue!
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#24
(08-16-2018, 08:31 AM)BIAD Wrote:
(08-15-2018, 10:59 PM)guohua Wrote: ...Here is a picture from the bedroom area of a 2009 386 Peterbilt.
Ours didn't have the extra bunk bed for a second driver, we had one full size bed, Refrigerator
and microwave and small closet space with storage under the bed and above. 

Great Scott! A veritable home-from-home!

When I was in my teens, I used to travel the UK with my friend in his little Mercedes flat-back truck.
It had no sleeping compartment -unless you count the seats and the floor!
I'll attach some picture of the sleeping area of a 2007 386 Peterbilt truck.
We really don't have any bed area pictures of our truck, my wife took the pictures and that area was off limits for pictures.  mediumwink 
Our's actually looked very similar to this picture, except our top blanker wasn't Red.
[Image: operator-comfort-sleeper.png]
Here is another picture of the same sleeper, yes we had my Coffee Maker and my wife had her Tea Maker and Rice Cooker, refrigerator and microwave.
Our truck had an APU (auxiliary power unit) on it for 110 volts, plus it ran our A/C or Heater at night without having to idle our engine 24/7 on the road.
The APU unit was a small diesel two cylinder generator. 
So yes, we had standard AC outlets in the sleeper for plugging in appliances.
[Image: operator-comfort.png]
You can imagine staying and living in this for 30 to 40 days a time before coming home to take some time off.
You Wash Clothes and Take Showers at Truck Stops and stop at a walmart or other shopping center like a Winnco to buy what you need, food to cook in your Microwave and Drinks and Vegetable, Fruits and anything else you may need.
Under the bed was a large storage area, plus you can see the size of the refrigerator/freezer there at the right of the picture. 
That black object in the picture on the left is where our Microwave was and that pullout you see under it was a table.
Once A Rogue, Always A Rogue!
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#25
Remember the ooh-aah about electric cars and Elon Musk's determination to drag the world away from Big Oil?

Maybe we can cast our minds back to the time when the mainstream media were falling over each other to explain
how London and the surrounding wastelands of the UK would become of an island of silent, clean-air drivers with
smiling Arabs all happy to see us not using their only product.

With the recent revelations from Japan in regards of Nissan falsifying data about exhaust emissions and the many
other car companies also failing to live-up to the hype about enviroment-friendly vehicles, the idea of an electric car
seemed strange to those -here on Rogue Nation, who pondered on the logistics of it all.

Maybe it was all a media campaign to promote a company on the Stock Exchange or maybe it was all true and the
Jetsons lifestyle was just around the corner. But unless you've got the cash and are willing to wait for your electric car,
such a dream is just that.

Quote:Tesla sheds $US5.4 billion after Elon Musk admits job stress getting to him.

'Shares of Electric car maker Tesla have tumbled about 9 per cent after CEO Elon Musk conceded in a newspaper
interview that job stress may be getting the best of him.

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Tesla shares closed at $US305.50 ($417.56) on Friday (local time), their lowest level since August 1, as analysts
and business professors questioned whether the company's board should grant Mr Musk leave or even replace
him with a more seasoned CEO.
The decline lopped $US5.4 billion off Tesla's market value.

In an interview with the New York Times Mr Musk admitted the past year had been the most "difficult and painful" of
his career. The newspaper reported that during an hour-long telephone interview Mr Musk alternated between laughter
and tears, acknowledging he was working up to 120 hours a week and sometimes took Ambien to get to sleep.

"It's kind of bizarre," said Charles Elson, director of the corporate governance centre at the University of Delaware.
"It's a drama we shouldn't be watching." Still, Mr Musk said in the interview he had no plans to give up his dual role
as Tesla's chairman and CEO.

Board supports Musk
Since the interview Tesla's board had shown no sign of taking any action. In a statement, the directors -excluding Mr
Musk himself -praised the CEO's dedication to the company.

"Over the past 15 years, Elon's leadership of the Tesla team has caused Tesla to grow from a small start-up to having
hundreds of thousands of cars on the road that customers love, employing tens of thousands of people around the world,
and creating significant shareholder value in the process," the statement said, without addressing Mr Musk's recent
behaviour.

The interview puts board members in a difficult position because Mr Musk, who entered Tesla as a major investor
and built the company into a force that has changed the perception of electric cars, is the company's public identity.
But Erik Gordon, a University of Michigan business and law professor, said Tesla's board had a fiduciary duty to
shareholders to take action.

"If the board does not get him out of this slot, at a minimum on a leave-of-absence basis, I think the board is going to
be seen by a lot of people who love the company as being derelict in their duties," Professor Gordon said.

The board has stood behind Mr Musk despite some bizarre behaviour. In July he labelled a diver who aided in the
cave rescue of Thai soccer players as a paedophile. He later apologised. But a tweet Mr Musk fired off last week
reportedly made him and the directors the targets of securities regulators, and may force the board to act.

Mr Musk tweeted he had "funding secured" to take Tesla private and avoid the quarterly earnings pressures from
Wall Street. The out-of-the-blue announcement raised a huge ruckus and pushed Tesla's shares up 11 per cent in
a day, boosting the company's value by $US6 billion.

There were multiple reports the US Securities and Exchange Commission was investigating the disclosure, including
asking board members what they knew about Mr Musk's plans. Experts said regulators were likely investigating if
Mr Musk was truthful in the tweet about having the financing set for the deal.

In New York Times interview, Mr Musk stood by the tweet. But he told the newspaper he wrote the tweet inside a
Tesla Model S while he was driving to the airport, and that no-one else reviewed it.
Asked if he regretted it, he said: "Why would I?"

In a separate report, The Wall Street Journal said securities regulators had been investigating if Tesla misled investors
about Model 3 production problems. The company could face sanctions if regulators find it did not accurately portray
production delays to investors.

Questions over Musk's future as CEO
The New York Times cited people familiar with the situation as saying the board had been trying to find a No. 2 executive
to help relieve some of the pressure on Mr Musk. Mr Gordon said the board had to act now or be open to shareholder
lawsuits. He suggested replacing Mr Musk as CEO and keeping him on as a visionary chief technical officer.

The interview and other actions, Mr Gordon said, were signs Mr Musk could no longer handle the CEO job.

Mr Musk spent nights at Tesla's Fremont, California, factory working out production problems on its new Model 3 car that
is supposed to take Tesla from niche luxury carmaker to a mass producer that competes with Detroit.
But Mr Gordon said a CEO would not live at the factory. Instead, he or she would form a team to work overnight and solve
problems.

The company said the board formed a special committee to evaluate proposals to take the company private. It later
disclosed that Mr Musk had talked with the Saudi Arabia Government investment fund about the deal.

Some of Mr Musk's stress comes from critical short-sellers who are betting against the company's success.
But much of it comes from Mr Musk's own pronouncements, such as lofty goals for production of cars or turning a sustained
profit starting this quarter, that might be beyond reach.

Tesla has never made money for a full year and has had only two profitable quarters since it went public in 2010...'
ABC.net:


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