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Yet Another School Shooting in Texas
#21
https://patents.justia.com/inventor/aaron-salter
Method and system for using the by-product of electrolysis

Patent number: 9863309

Waste compactor system for vehicles

Patent number: 9399552

Is it the same Aaron Salter which died in the buffalo shooting? 

Before they hide their killings behind ppl like Ted Bundy.
в ближайшем будущем во всем мире  потребление сильно упадет (включая сокращение продуктов питания)  ... Кто будет возражать -  будуть  закрывать рот силой...  Причем аргументация будет -   экологической... Разумная земля (природа, ноосфера) - важнее человека...

28 07 19|14 = 68
01 09 19|39 = 68
24 02 20|22 = 68
I need to figure out what does 68 means
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#22
(05-26-2022, 02:43 AM)Snarl Wrote: Where did he get the money to buy the weapons?

We're talking thousands of dollars spent on his 18th birthday ... guns, optics, ammunition.  It's not very likely he saved it up by himself during the first 17 years he spent on this planet.

Nobody seems to be asking this question.  That question would change the course of where the government hopes to go with this.  I'm not all 'that' smart.  What's wrong with this picture?

Some folks are discussing it, quietly.

My son and I had that conversation last night.

This SOB was only 18. Freshly turned 18. He lived with his grandma, the same one he shot in the face that day, and had moved in with her in March. He was unemployed, and mostly unemployable at any money-making job because he had dropped out of high school. Not the sort of person you generally find rolling in money.

He bought 2 AR's within 3 days of one another. One on March 17 along with 375 rounds of 5.56x45mm, and another AR on March 20.

One of his AR's was a Smith and Wesson M+P-15 ( I think that one lists for around 725 bucks) and the other was a Daniels Defense DDM4 V7

So where does an unemployed and mostly unemployable teenage high school dropout get that kind of cash all of the sudden? Inquiring minds want to know, but it smells funny all the way over here.

.
“The nature of psychological compulsion is such that those who act under constraint remain under the impression that they are acting on their own initiative. The victim of mind-manipulation does not know that he is a victim. To him the walls of his prison are invisible, and he believes himself to be free. That he is not free is apparent only to other people.”

-Aldous Huxley

-- Got mask? Just sayin'...




Reply
#23
(05-26-2022, 03:05 AM)Schmoe1 Wrote:
(05-26-2022, 02:43 AM)Snarl Wrote: Where did he get the money to buy the weapons?

We're talking thousands of dollars spent on his 18th birthday ... guns, optics, ammunition.  It's not very likely he saved it up by himself during the first 17 years he spent on this planet.

Nobody seems to be asking this question.  That question would change the course of where the government hopes to go with this.  I'm not all 'that' smart.  What's wrong with this picture?


Did they say the type of rifle used?  We all know M4-type rifles range from $500-$4,000+ last time I looked.  I think it's conceivable he bought it all himself.  I did pretty well for myself in high school during the summers when I worked on a tree removal crew.  I could've easily bought a few rifles, optics, and ammo.

Granted, I don't know anything about the shooter, if he worked at all or not.

See above post for a little background. The DDM4 V7 lists for over 2 grand when I checked it last night. the S+W MP-15 listed for 725.00 when I bought one back in 2016.

The Daniel's Defense "rifle" doesn't even come with sights, meaning to my mind it's not even really a rifle, being unfinished right out of the box like that. To get just a plain old set of flip up iron sights for it will cost around 150 bucks.

Optics run higher than that.

He easily dropped 3K+ in three days time on just guns and accessories.

All with no visible means of support.

And he was shot by an off-duty CBP Agent who came in on the call.

Dead men tell no tales.


.
“The nature of psychological compulsion is such that those who act under constraint remain under the impression that they are acting on their own initiative. The victim of mind-manipulation does not know that he is a victim. To him the walls of his prison are invisible, and he believes himself to be free. That he is not free is apparent only to other people.”

-Aldous Huxley

-- Got mask? Just sayin'...




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#24
(05-26-2022, 03:39 AM)Schmoe1 Wrote: Well you definitely make a great point.  Apparently he killed his grandmother, so I wonder if he lived with her and was robbing her blind.  If not, who indeed provided the money?

last I heard, he hadn't killed her, but he did shoot her in the face, then stole her car to make his escape and go to the school when she called the police. last I heard, she was listed as critical at the hospital. That may have changed by now.

He did live with her, but only moved in in march, a few days before that massive cash outlay.

.
“The nature of psychological compulsion is such that those who act under constraint remain under the impression that they are acting on their own initiative. The victim of mind-manipulation does not know that he is a victim. To him the walls of his prison are invisible, and he believes himself to be free. That he is not free is apparent only to other people.”

-Aldous Huxley

-- Got mask? Just sayin'...




Reply
#25
So many questions about this whole situation. How did he have the funds to acquire the fire arms. Why is the gun shop he bought them from saying they never saw him before when he allegedly purchased them the week before.

Was he being chased by police when he crashed his truck by the school. How was a unlocked door that is usually locked open ? Why were some police allowed in to get their kids while all the others remained outside for 90 minutes while keeping the parents from entering. 

I don't know if any of this is true, just what I have read so far. Rumors or truth ?
The Truth is Out There, Somewhere
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#26
UPDATE:

If you weren't upset before, guess what? The video covers the timeline starting around the 1:10 mark and forward. 

I do not understand what the police were doing. At all. The only way it makes sense is if they were all cowards. Some of the LE on site went in the building to get their own kids out but would not confront the shooter in another classroom. They detained parents who saw the police were doing nothing and decided to go in themselves.  tinyok tinyok tinyok



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#27
(05-27-2022, 02:03 AM)ABNARTY Wrote: UPDATE:

If you weren't upset before, guess what? The video covers the timeline starting around the 1:10 mark and forward. 

I do not understand what the police were doing. At all. The only way it makes sense is if they were all cowards. Some of the LE on site went in the building to get their own kids out but would not confront the shooter in another classroom. They detained parents who saw the police were doing nothing and decided to go in themselves.  tinyok tinyok tinyok




I was watching it all as it unfolded. Started off as 2 dead, 13 kids sent to hospitals. I don't remember what time it was. All of a sudden, it was 20 something people dead. No ambulances. No injured in the hospital. All dead. 

It all seems a little off.
The Truth is Out There, Somewhere
Reply
#28
(05-27-2022, 02:37 AM)kdog Wrote:
(05-27-2022, 02:03 AM)ABNARTY Wrote: UPDATE:

If you weren't upset before, guess what? The video covers the timeline starting around the 1:10 mark and forward. 

I do not understand what the police were doing. At all. The only way it makes sense is if they were all cowards. Some of the LE on site went in the building to get their own kids out but would not confront the shooter in another classroom. They detained parents who saw the police were doing nothing and decided to go in themselves.  tinyok tinyok tinyok




I was watching it all as it unfolded. Started off as 2 dead, 13 kids sent to hospitals. I don't remember what time it was. All of a sudden, it was 20 something people dead. No ambulances. No injured in the hospital. All dead. 

It all seems a little off.

They know how to play the manipulation game well. In fact they are masters of taking the information and tweaking it to morph it into anything they want to make it. They have made it clear to us for years that they are in control.



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#29
Here is my perspective on school security from my personal experience.

I work at a local elementary and the doors require an electronic key fob. The front entrance and two parking area entrances use electronic locks that require the key fob. All other doors are locked from inside.

Once into the front vestibule you are in view of the main office with a locked door and the doors to the main hallway, also locked, both require a key fob. Once in the building there are fire doors that isolate each wing at their hallway entrance. Each classroom can be locked down by key and manually with a door stop plate. There is an extensive CCTV security system as well. I don't think anyone at the school monitors it, it may just record though their server.

All that security is great, except the teachers regularly leave side doors unlocked and windows open in classrooms. One of the front doors won't close and lock properly, so it is often unlocked. Also, the doors at the front are normally open during certain hours (indicated by a green light on the fob unit) with the inner hallway doors always unlocked now for some reason. The fire doors are never closed either, but are at the high school after school is out of session.

I know these things because part of my job is to perform a security check of the entire building on a daily basis. However, when I began doing that, it was with the idea of preventing vandalism and thievery. After awhile, I began to think about tactical issues like if I were stuck here or there, what could I do, etc. I know that building inside and out, I know it's strengths and weaknesses, how to hide, or to break in or break out as the case may be.

Now, esp. now, I look over my shoulder all the time. There has already been three incidences near the school this year, one of which I was unaware of happening during work (can't listen to or monitor news while working). There was a school lock down about 8 miles from my school just yesterday. It's a good strong rural community but more and more people are losing it, even out here.

The application of this school's current (and fairly decent) security measures are lax in my opinion. I don't think the teachers and staff gives much consideration to the security or does any routine checks. They may do a drill on occasion, I'm not sure, but based on what I've seen, it will be chaos if something really goes down.

As an example, the manual stop plates for the doors go into two holes in the cement floor in front of the inside of each room's doors to make it extremely had to break into the room when used. But there are three doors per room, and only one stop plate per room (a few have two) and many of the holes in the floors are packed with floor wax, crap and dirt to the point you can't get the stop plate to fit into the holes. That is the teacher's last line of defense and obviously not too many teachers ever tried to used the stop plate or have considered any of the defensive tactical aspects of their classroom.

All I can say is, if teachers and staff don't take this seriously, how can they rely on security measures that require their participation to work? It must be some kind of "it can't happen here" normalcy bias or "the security is good, not my problem" attitude.
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#30
(05-26-2022, 10:44 PM)Ninurta Wrote:
(05-26-2022, 03:39 AM)Schmoe1 Wrote: Well you definitely make a great point.  Apparently he killed his grandmother, so I wonder if he lived with her and was robbing her blind.  If not, who indeed provided the money?

last I heard, he hadn't killed her, but he did shoot her in the face, then stole her car to make his escape and go to the school when she called the police. last I heard, she was listed as critical at the hospital. That may have changed by now.

He did live with her, but only moved in in march, a few days before that massive cash outlay.

.

Well we have another school shooting where something stinks.  In this shooting, a lot of things stink.  Armed cops waiting outside while shots are fired at kids.  An unemployed fuck who dropped 3k+ on gear, and the gun shop doesn't recognize him, even though he purchased it days ago.  The timeline of the tweets from the school.  

The biggest thing I can't wrap my head around is all those cops doing nothing.  And arresting parents trying to get in there?  Makes me sick.  How any of the coward fucks can look themselves in the mirror is beyond me.
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#31
(05-27-2022, 05:21 AM)Michigan Swamp Buck Wrote: Here is my perspective on school security from my personal experience.

I work at a local elementary and the doors require an electronic key fob. The front entrance and two parking area entrances use electronic locks that require the key fob. All other doors are locked from inside.

Once into the front vestibule you are in view of the main office with a locked door and the doors to the main hallway, also locked, both require a key fob. Once in the building there are fire doors that isolate each wing at their hallway entrance. Each classroom can be locked down by key and manually with a door stop plate. There is an extensive CCTV security system as well. I don't think anyone at the school monitors it, it may just record though their server.

All that security is great, except the teachers regularly leave side doors unlocked and windows open in classrooms. One of the front doors won't close and lock properly, so it is often unlocked. Also, the doors at the front are normally open during certain hours (indicated by a green light on the fob unit) with the inner hallway doors always unlocked now for some reason. The fire doors are never closed either, but are at the high school after school is out of session.

I know these things because part of my job is to perform a security check of the entire building on a daily basis. However, when I began doing that, it was with the idea of preventing vandalism and thievery. After awhile, I began to think about tactical issues like if I were stuck here or there, what could I do, etc. I know that building inside and out, I know it's strengths and weaknesses, how to hide, or to break in or break out as the case may be.

Now, esp. now, I look over my shoulder all the time. There has already been three incidences near the school this year, one of which I was unaware of happening during work (can't listen to or monitor news while working). There was a school lock down about 8 miles from my school just yesterday. It's a good strong rural community but more and more people are losing it, even out here.

The application of this school's current (and fairly decent) security measures are lax in my opinion. I don't think the teachers and staff gives much consideration to the security or does any routine checks. They may do a drill on occasion, I'm not sure, but based on what I've seen, it will be chaos if something really goes down.

As an example, the manual stop plates for the doors go into two holes in the cement floor in front of the inside of each room's doors to make it extremely had to break into the room when used. But there are three doors per room, and only one stop plate per room (a few have two) and many of the holes in the floors are packed with floor wax, crap and dirt to the point you can't get the stop plate to fit into the holes. That is the teacher's last line of defense and obviously not too many teachers ever tried to used the stop plate or have considered any of the defensive tactical aspects of their classroom.

All I can say is, if teachers and staff don't take this seriously, how can they rely on security measures that require their participation to work? It must be some kind of "it can't happen here" normalcy bias or "the security is good, not my problem" attitude.

That sounds a lot like how my high school was.  What do you think about having an armed guard at every school, who monitors some cameras to catch any incoming threats?  I think it would at least buy time for law enforcement to arrive, granted they actually do anything.  Best case, the guard eliminates the threat by themselves.
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#32
(05-27-2022, 05:29 AM)Schmoe1 Wrote:
(05-27-2022, 05:21 AM)Michigan Swamp Buck Wrote: Here is my perspective on school security from my personal experience.

I work at a local elementary and the doors require an electronic key fob. The front entrance and two parking area entrances use electronic locks that require the key fob. All other doors are locked from inside.

Once into the front vestibule you are in view of the main office with a locked door and the doors to the main hallway, also locked, both require a key fob. Once in the building there are fire doors that isolate each wing at their hallway entrance. Each classroom can be locked down by key and manually with a door stop plate. There is an extensive CCTV security system as well. I don't think anyone at the school monitors it, it may just record though their server.

All that security is great, except the teachers regularly leave side doors unlocked and windows open in classrooms. One of the front doors won't close and lock properly, so it is often unlocked. Also, the doors at the front are normally open during certain hours (indicated by a green light on the fob unit) with the inner hallway doors always unlocked now for some reason. The fire doors are never closed either, but are at the high school after school is out of session.

I know these things because part of my job is to perform a security check of the entire building on a daily basis. However, when I began doing that, it was with the idea of preventing vandalism and thievery. After awhile, I began to think about tactical issues like if I were stuck here or there, what could I do, etc. I know that building inside and out, I know it's strengths and weaknesses, how to hide, or to break in or break out as the case may be.

Now, esp. now, I look over my shoulder all the time. There has already been three incidences near the school this year, one of which I was unaware of happening during work (can't listen to or monitor news while working). There was a school lock down about 8 miles from my school just yesterday. It's a good strong rural community but more and more people are losing it, even out here.

The application of this school's current (and fairly decent) security measures are lax in my opinion. I don't think the teachers and staff gives much consideration to the security or does any routine checks. They may do a drill on occasion, I'm not sure, but based on what I've seen, it will be chaos if something really goes down.

As an example, the manual stop plates for the doors go into two holes in the cement floor in front of the inside of each room's doors to make it extremely had to break into the room when used. But there are three doors per room, and only one stop plate per room (a few have two) and many of the holes in the floors are packed with floor wax, crap and dirt to the point you can't get the stop plate to fit into the holes. That is the teacher's last line of defense and obviously not too many teachers ever tried to used the stop plate or have considered any of the defensive tactical aspects of their classroom.

All I can say is, if teachers and staff don't take this seriously, how can they rely on security measures that require their participation to work? It must be some kind of "it can't happen here" normalcy bias or "the security is good, not my problem" attitude.

That sounds a lot like how my high school was.  What do you think about having an armed guard at every school, who monitors some cameras to catch any incoming threats?  I think it would at least buy time for law enforcement to arrive, granted they actually do anything.  Best case, the guard eliminates the threat by themselves.

If you're going to put one on the cameras, you'll need another for a roving patrol so that any miscreants can't be certain of his location at any particular point in time. And further, I'd say that camera/roving duty should be swapped out between the two every 2 hours or so, because watching those cameras can lead to boredom and complacency, which in turn could lead to missing something the watcher should have seen.

I was a security shift supervisor for a CitiBank installation for a couple years. We had one guard at the entrance, one on the cameras, and a roving guard. The glaring flaw in their setup was that they never allowed for swapping out the camera guy nor gave him any relief other than two ten minute breaks per shift. he even had to eat his lunch watching the cameras, and that was bad juju. That was policy, and in my opinion a really bad one.

They had all the tech in the world - 36 cameras, retinal scanners for entry, the whole shebang, but none of the people skills in their policies to run the human element of the security properly. There's more to securing a facility than gadgets and stuffed shirts making bad policy.


.
“The nature of psychological compulsion is such that those who act under constraint remain under the impression that they are acting on their own initiative. The victim of mind-manipulation does not know that he is a victim. To him the walls of his prison are invisible, and he believes himself to be free. That he is not free is apparent only to other people.”

-Aldous Huxley

-- Got mask? Just sayin'...




Reply
#33
Here's something I posted in the shoutbox.

https://www.wsaz.com/2022/05/26/person-d...ired-call/

This past Wednesday evening, a man armed with an AR-15 opened fire on a party crowd in Charelston, WV, and a woman with a pistol dropped him like a pole axed steer before he could do his intended damage.

You don't hear about the ones that got stopped in the MSM. You only hear about the body counts that the ones that DIDN'T get stopped rack up.

I think it happens a lot more than folks realize, but since it doesn't bleed enough to lead and doesn't generate a body count, it tends to go against the citizen disarmament agenda they are trying to promote so the MSM buries it.

And WV is a "Constitutional carry" state, so no government permission in the form of a CCW permit necessary to carry concealed.

It's odd how their policies there tend to stop mass shootings cold in their tracks, ain't it? It's just possible that congress critters should get a clue from that.

.
“The nature of psychological compulsion is such that those who act under constraint remain under the impression that they are acting on their own initiative. The victim of mind-manipulation does not know that he is a victim. To him the walls of his prison are invisible, and he believes himself to be free. That he is not free is apparent only to other people.”

-Aldous Huxley

-- Got mask? Just sayin'...




Reply
#34
Just as @Michigan Swamp Buck wrote, the school didn't adhere to the standardised manner these facilities are
required to, these days.



Quote:Uvalde shooting: Texas school gunman 'walked in unobstructed'

'The gunman who attacked a school in Texas on Tuesday was able to enter the building unobstructed, police say.
Texas Ranger Victor Escalon said no armed guard challenged the teenage attacker and it is unclear if the school door was even locked.
Mr Escalon defended the police response amid mounting criticism of an apparent delay in confronting the gunman.

Witnesses were quoted as saying police were hesitant to confront the killer inside Uvalde's Robb Elementary School.
The attacker shot dead 19 students and two teachers, and injured at least 17 more people.
The latest details from police sharply contradict what was said at a news briefing two days ago.

Mr Escalon said on Thursday that initial reports the gunman had shot a guard were incorrect, and there was in fact no guard inside the
school when the shooter arrived
. Mr Escalon said officers entered the school four minutes after the gunman went in at about 11:40.
But it was an hour before the gunman was killed in a shootout, at 12:45, after US Border Patrol tactical teams arrived.

"They [didn't] make entry immediately because of the gunfire they were receiving," Mr Escalon told reporters.
Videos have emerged of police being urged by desperate family members to storm the building immediately.

A father whose daughter died in the attack told the Associated Press news agency he had considered running into the school with bystanders out
of frustration at the police response. One mother told the Wall Street Journal that she was briefly handcuffed, accused of impeding a police investigation,
after demanding along with other parents that officers storm the building.

Angeli Rose Gomez said she saw one frantic father thrown to the ground by an officer, another father pepper-sprayed and a third who was later tased.
"The police were doing nothing," said Ms Gomez, who was eventually released before she said she jumped over the school fence and ran inside to rescue
her two children. "They [the police] were just standing outside the fence. They weren't going in there or running anywhere."

Mr Escalon - a Texas Ranger and spokesman for the Texas Department of Public Safety - said that during the time officers were outside the school they
were calling in reinforcements and "also evacuating students, teachers". "An hour later US Border Patrol tactical teams arrive, they make entry and shoot
and kill the suspect," he added.

This deviates from guidance that became standard police practice after the 1999 Columbine High School massacre, which states that the first officers on
the scene should do whatever they can, and as fast as they can, to stop an attack, without waiting for backup.

After crashing his truck into a ditch near the school, the gunman emerged and began firing an AR-style rifle at two people who were exiting a funeral home.
The suspect then jumped a fence and began firing "multiple, numerous rounds" at the school building, Mr Escalon said.
As he approached the entrance he "was not confronted by anybody", the ranger said.

According to Uvalde County Independent School District Officers protocol, campuses are required to have staff "who patrol door entrances, parking lots
and perimeters". Teachers are told to keep doors locked at all times. "We will find out as much as we can why it was unlocked," Mr Escalon said. "Or
maybe it was locked. But right now, it appears it was unlocked."

Texas congressman Joaquin Castro has written to the director of the FBI to ask that agents investigate the law enforcement response to the attack as
it was unfolding. Officials say they do not yet know how many bullets the teen fired during the rampage, but one law enforcement source told CBS News
the gunman was carrying over 600 rounds of ammunition.

That's more than double what the average US combat soldier carries, the source said, adding that it appears the gunman was preparing for a massive gun
battle with police. Investigators have found no indication the gunman had a history of mental illness or a criminal record.
He legally purchased two AR-style rifles in the week before the attack, after turning 18.

President Joe Biden and the US first lady will visit Uvalde on Sunday, the White House announced. Across the country, students staged class walk-outs on
Thursday to protest against gun violence in schools. A father has told the BBC how his two terrified children hid as the massacre unfolded inside Robb
Elementary.

"My son ran up to me and said he didn't think he was going to make it out - that he didn't think he was going to see me or his mother again," Jesse Jimenez
said. "My daughter was lost, she didn't know what was going on, she didn't know if it was a drill or if it was real."
On Thursday, the husband of one of the two teachers killed in the attack died from a heart attack.
Joe Garcia "passed away due to grief" two days after his wife of 24 years, Irma Garcia, family members said.
BBC:
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"They watch from behind complacent smiles whilst polishing their cutlery. Yet, with egg between the prongs"
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#35
A lot of people are comparing this to Sandy Hook. I haven't looked to see what Alex Jones has to say.

Okay, I am stirring the pot with that comment.

From what I have seen so far, the attempts to save face, and cover their asses, is creating more questions and creating suspicion and doubt.
This is a tiny town, in a poor area. I am sure they thought they were safe. A place where everyone knows everyone, is not going to see a threat in a familiar and known face. I don't think it odd that the guy was able to get into the school.

My question falls into the category of how he was able to acquire the weapons, and ammunition, and how he manged to get them to the school while being chased.

The police were locals. Never thought in a million years they would see something like this in their community. They were not trained, or prepared for this. My question here is why the same instinct to rush the building and, at least try, to save the children, did not overcome the police.

Saving children is a primordial instinct, especially if the children are your children. Children of your own community. There are a lot of questions, and a lot of lessons to be learned, after the fact. I just hope they don't waste time pointing fingers, and get straight to the job of identifying their mistakes and correcting them.
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#36
(05-26-2022, 10:23 PM)Ninurta Wrote:
(05-26-2022, 02:43 AM)Snarl Wrote: Where did he get the money to buy the weapons?

it smells funny all the way over here.

Funny enough ... that I went out and bought another lower yesterday. Wrecked a roll-pin and didn't finish putting it together though -chuckle- should have had more of those in the toolbox. They are such a bitch.
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If the Dembos aren't washed away during the mid-terms, my bet is they (and I mean Dems and RINOs) will be making their gun-grab before Biden leaves office ... if they've got the balls.

These crazies and their shoot-em-ups at the schoolhouses are the perfect catalyst for open warfare on the 2nd Amendment in the Bill of Rights.

1st worst idea ever: Not incorporating those enumerated rights into the Body of the Constitution ... so any breach breaks the country ... as it should be to any agreement
2nd worst idea ever: Not defining a penalty of death for _any_ infringement of enumerated rights (even the discussion of such ... fuck the 1st Amendment at that specific point ... if there is any exception, that should be it!!) to keep the country from breaking apart into individual states

I have to admit, I am a little giddy at the concept of a 2d Revolution in this lifetime.
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#37
I think that plan is backfiring.

People are thinking more about self protection than ever before. They know the police departments are overwhelmed, corrupt, or incompetent, and they know the government is a bigger threat to their ability to put food on the table or keep a roof over the heads of their children than ever before.

Nobody in their right mind would allow the de-arming of the citizenry at this time.

The only way people will willing give up their arms, is during a time of abundance and peace. We are in the middle of a shit storm. That would be like throwing your life preserver overboard to lighten the weight of the boat thinking that move would save you.

If they are looking for a way to get the people to willingly pound their weapons into plows, this is not it.
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#38
Reply to Schmoe1:

I think a security team is wise, wouldn't even have to be armed. Two guys, one on patrol and another monitoring the CCTV cameras. Both should have two-ways, maybe armed with a taser or pepper spray if it's a bad school district and some kind of body armor at least on hand if needed.

My point is really that all teachers and staff should be involved. With all those eyes on the alert and a land line telephone in each room like they have, plus a school wide public address system, a shooter would never get in or at least everyone in the building can be alerted more quickly.

They need a serious training course that includes situational awareness along with the lock down and evacuation procedures they currently have. There are really simple things too, like heavy curtains that can be closed over windows and doors to hide targets. Classroom arrangement of tables, cabinets and shelves for use in defensive cover. I know a couple of the male teachers have a baseball bat in their classroom, at the ready I suspect. I've often wondered who might be armed with something in their vehicle. Not allowed, but stored legally in your trunk, you may get away with the excuse you were headed to the shooting range after work.
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#39
(05-26-2022, 09:15 PM)EndtheMadnessNow Wrote: [Image: Snip.png]

Discussion of the Police State and how to address it was why I got the boot on TOS. Leaves me wondering in the long run.

(05-26-2022, 09:15 PM)EndtheMadnessNow Wrote: Remember that time during Watergate when Edward Lansdale planned to fake the second coming of a pro-US Christ using submarine-mounted holograms to distract/manipulate the catholic population of Cuba long enough to stage and justify an invasion?

Jacques Vallée: "which is well within our technology."

In the book "Civilian Warriors: the inside story of Blackwater and the unsung heroes of the War on Terror", (2013) by Erik Prince describes how the Columbine shooting and the law enforcement response to it prompted Blackwater to expand its programming into active shooter training.

23 years later, cops are still standing outside while children are senselessly (sacrificed) slaughtered. Does not make sense until one reviews ours past 23 years of such ever increasing madness.

I don't know how to lay this out in the best way.

I _know_ God is real.  "Belief" is a completely fucked up qualification.  Either you have met him ... or you have not. Belief is an abject failure when it comes to God.

I worked for Blackwater for 4 1/2 years (they paid damned good and that's my excuse). They taught me to kill without passion. And, for that, I am eternally grateful.

Cops suck.  There's no other definition ... and, I was one for 17 years ... so, I know what my very own eyes saw.  They are tools.  They (about 40%)(for the most part) never realize this.  They're also one of the most corrupt bureaucracies in the country (next to school boards and our very own defined government establishments).

If you ever take a cop's life ... don't worry about it.  They ARE your enemy ... whether you know it (or they know it) is NOT relevant.

As for the school shootings: Isn't it obvious yet, that the regular Joe shouldn't be trying to leverage the 'establishment' any longer these days?  Stoopid damned sheople.
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#40
I think the play here isn't the government taking your guns; it *wants* you to have them. Every new shooting juices guns sales, which juices campaign contributions; and it allows them to institute ever more draconian laws violating all of your civil liberties except gun ownership.

"But the bad guys will just get guns illegally!"

Yes, that is intentional, too.

They (congress/lobbyists) often cite this as the reason that the police need to be militarized...the 1997 North Hollywood shootout being the prime example.

US Army has hidden or downplayed loss of firearms for years

Guess what happened where the red line is...

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NRA to press on with Houston conference despite Texas school shooting

The assault weapons ban ended in 2004.

Republicans in Congress passed the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act (PLCAA) in 2005, shielding gun manufacturers from lawsuits.

Crime Bill Act of 1994 10-year limit on assault weapons expired. Joe Biden was a key author of that law.

Quote:CIA's Secret 'Midwest Depot' Arms Cache Really in ... Texas? (May 5, 2014)

A retired CIA analyst may have lifted the lid on one of the most secret facilities in America—the "Midwest Depot" where the agency has stockpiled untraceable weapons for decades. Allen Thomson has assembled evidence that suggests the facility that the CIA used to supply weapons to operations including the Bay of Pigs invasion and to insurgencies around the world is actually at Camp Stanley, an Army weapons storage facility just north of San Antonio, Texas, the New York Times finds.

"Such weapons are pretty durable and, after the cause du jour passed, where did they go? To be a little dramatic about it, how many of those AK-47s and RPG-7s we see Islamists waving around today passed through the Midwest Depot on their way to freedom fighters in past decades?" His research can be found on the website of the Federation of American Scientists. Unsurprisingly, the CIA and Pentagon declined to comment on the matter but whatever the camp's true purpose, documents reveal that there have been quite a few new warehouses built at the site in recent years, the Times notes.

Mae Brussell from her radio broadcast "Dialogue: Conspiracy", April 8, 1974:

"The CIA has a big depot in the Midwest United States where they have all kinds of military equipment and all kinds of unmarked weapons and over the years, they bought everything they could get their hands [on] all over the world that is untraceable. That's why when Lawrence Kwong from a mental hospital in San Francisco shoots Ben Munson at KGO-TV and then kills himself and has told the detective he was ‘programmed to do it,’ the gun is untraceable." (start @ 24:00)

https://youtu.be/1_uO_uSYPjQ?t=1440



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https://twitter.com/HillaryClinton/statu...4276428800


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https://twitter.com/RedKahina/status/153...6480119810


BTW, Outdoor Life magazine named Uvalde County one of the best white-tailed deer hunting areas in the USA.


Robb Elementary School, Uvalde TX
Location: 29.199, -99.78

Palm Terrace Elementary School, Daytona Florida
29.199, -81.076868

I'm sure it's nothing.

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"The underlying aim was not to win the war but to use the conflict to create a constant state of destabilized perception in order to manage and control." ― Vladislav Yuryevich Surkov

"The wisdom they claim we gain, is just all the wisdom we already had, but was oblivious to it, because we were too busy trying to change what we couldn't and refusing to change what we could, when we could."
― NightskyeB4Dawn


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