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Flu Like Illness & Dehydration
#1
This really catch my eye today..... tinybigeyes


We all know that there is clear seasonal time frame with influenza and other flu like symptoms, common cold etc..


Another known thing is lack of Sun / vitamin D.


But what about the effect of dry air to our lung mucosal barriers ? It think is it probably far more important than many us have been thinking, at least i did not think it so important before reading about it now.


It`s explained in this twitter below with details . To me it makes sense . And now , as many RN members are feeling the winter weather , it`s good to remind about indoor humidity , to not let it go down too much as the heating of house start go more up. Too dry indoor air can lead to flu like illness , body dont just work at best level when it`s dehydrated .



Kaur Parve Twitter
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#2
When I was a kid growing up, we used to heat the house with wood and coal. In the winter time, since the air is colder, it does not hold as much moisture, so heating that already depleted air REALLY made it dry. What we would do is put a big pot of water on top of the heating stove to heat it and evaporate it. I used to chuck a couple of sassafras roots into the pot, so it did double duty of humidifying the air and making sassafras tea at the same time - and you couldn't beat the sassafras scent that it filled the air with!

.
“The nature of psychological compulsion is such that those who act under constraint remain under the impression that they are acting on their own initiative. The victim of mind-manipulation does not know that he is a victim. To him the walls of his prison are invisible, and he believes himself to be free. That he is not free is apparent only to other people.”

-Aldous Huxley

-- Got mask? Just sayin'...




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#3
(11-27-2021, 08:11 PM)Ninurta Wrote: When I was a kid growing up, we used to heat the house with wood and coal. In the winter time, since the air is colder, it does not hold as much moisture, so heating that already depleted air REALLY made it dry. What we would do is put a big pot of water on top of the heating stove to heat it and evaporate it. I used to chuck a couple of sassafras roots into the pot, so it did double duty of humidifying the air and making sassafras tea at the same time - and you couldn't beat the sassafras scent that it filled the air with!

.

And that is a great cure for waking up with a dry mouth and/or a headache.  In winter when I wake up in the morning I take the pot of water off the stove, make myself a coffee, refill and put back on the stove to reheat the water.  If the  pot boils dry I know because I feel dry and have a headache.  Good tip to pass on Nin.  I have never used sassafras root.  

Does that go well with a strong coffee?

Bally:)
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#4
I kind of think one thing important as you said..... VITAMIN D
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#5
(11-28-2021, 07:40 AM)PLOTUS Wrote: I kind of think one thing important as you said..... VITAMIN D

Yep, it was so important that i buyed vitamin d lamp , this is the first winter i have it , it seems to energize me also .


Btw, there is some differences between the pill vitamin D3 and from what body makes from skin when get the right light.



Quote:In the presence of sunlight, skin cells produce vitamin D3 sulfate, a water-soluble form of the typically fat-soluble vitamin D. The sulfate form can travel freely throughout the bloodstream. But the vitamin D3 found in oral supplements is an unsulfated form  that requires low density lipoprotein (LDL) — the so-called “bad” cholesterol — for transport to receptor sites in the body.

Sulfate: A Common Nutrient Deficiency You’re Probably Ignoring


And cholesterol sulfate is another good substance

Sunlight and Vitamin D: They’re Not the Same Thing


Why Vitamin D3 Supplements May Not Replace Sunshine
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#6
(11-28-2021, 06:57 AM)Bally002 Wrote:
(11-27-2021, 08:11 PM)Ninurta Wrote: When I was a kid growing up, we used to heat the house with wood and coal. In the winter time, since the air is colder, it does not hold as much moisture, so heating that already depleted air REALLY made it dry. What we would do is put a big pot of water on top of the heating stove to heat it and evaporate it. I used to chuck a couple of sassafras roots into the pot, so it did double duty of humidifying the air and making sassafras tea at the same time - and you couldn't beat the sassafras scent that it filled the air with!

.

And that is a great cure for waking up with a dry mouth and/or a headache.  In winter when I wake up in the morning I take the pot of water off the stove, make myself a coffee, refill and put back on the stove to reheat the water.  If the  pot boils dry I know because I feel dry and have a headache.  Good tip to pass on Nin.  I have never used sassafras root.  

Does that go well with a strong coffee?

Bally:)

I doubt it would go well with coffee - it's a lot like root beer or sarsparilla, in tea form. It was used as a spring tonic here years ago to purify the blood and invigorate, but now they say it has something called "saffrole" in it that is allegedly toxic to the liver. All I can say is I drank gallons of it, and it never hurt me.

.
“The nature of psychological compulsion is such that those who act under constraint remain under the impression that they are acting on their own initiative. The victim of mind-manipulation does not know that he is a victim. To him the walls of his prison are invisible, and he believes himself to be free. That he is not free is apparent only to other people.”

-Aldous Huxley

-- Got mask? Just sayin'...




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#7
(11-27-2021, 08:11 PM)Ninurta Wrote: When I was a kid growing up, we used to heat the house with wood and coal. In the winter time, since the air is colder, it does not hold as much moisture, so heating that already depleted air REALLY made it dry. What we would do is put a big pot of water on top of the heating stove to heat it and evaporate it. I used to chuck a couple of sassafras roots into the pot, so it did double duty of humidifying the air and making sassafras tea at the same time - and you couldn't beat the sassafras scent that it filled the air with!

.


That`s good method, i dont know sassafras roots thought,  i mean never hear about it.



I use Evaporative Air Cooler  for getting more moisture in to air.....it`s made for summer heat but it`s actually good in winter to prevent dry air , and dont require any heating of water, only needs to fill the water tank sometimes .

Like this one but different brand

Evaporative Air Cooler
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