Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Hurricane Irma Could Hit New York on 9-11
#1
Here comes another potentially devastating hurricane that could wreck havoc on the U.S. coast, Hurricane Irma. Some models show it reaching a level 5 before making landfall sometime next week.  tinycrying And, don't you find it odd that it could strike on 9-11... in New York?   tinyhuh

I have to say again, Mother Nature does her thing naturally, but I have to wonder if the "weather gods" don't have a hand in this one, (and Harvey). I'm speaking about HAARP, for those who don't know.  (Research HAARP and weather control, if you don't know about it already.)

Just look at the dates of past devastating hurricanes that crippled the U.S.  

[Image: Hurricanes_on_Aug_29.jpg]

Is there some kind of secret society ritual for August 29th that I'm not aware of?   tinybighuh 

Here is the first of two videos tracking Irma, and they both show her hitting NY.  If she doesn't stay on the first path, she could be heading straight for the Gulf States again! tinycrying :






You'll have to watch the second video from the source page: Video Link




Reply
#2
One other thing I'd like to mention.  I've heard it said that all it would take to take out the United States would be to have several major disasters to where we couldn't recover from the loss.

I'm wondering if this is what the Deep State has planned?  They need to get rid of Trump, but they can't, so they are going to take us out with "natural" disasters.
And, what about the increase in the tremors at Yellow Stone? Is that something else they are doing? Hurricanes, droughts, earthquakes... all of those can be caused and controlled using HAARP technology.
Ms. G. has a recent thread on that, if anyone wants to look into it, and I have a very old thread on HAARP that goes deep into what all they can do. Just click on my name and look over my older threads.

Just a thought.  I guess I'm getting ahead of myself. We need to wait and see what happens with Irma before hitting another panic button, right? 

Here's to hoping Irma takes a turn and goes back out to sea!   minusculebeercheers




Reply
#3
Click on this link to follow IRMA's path:  Global Map Live




Reply
#4
I haven't heard anything about it hitting N.Y.

Mainly the Florida coast and whether or not it stays in the Atlantic or goes into the Gulf.
To early to tell just yet.

This is from NOAA.....looks like we'll know more come the weekend, whether it starts turning northward or keeps going west.
Personally, I don't like the way the prediction is looking at the moment.  tinycrying
Poor Floridans, they will catch it either way looks like.

[Image: 234935_5day_cone_no_line_and_wind.png]

a.k.a. 'snarky412'
 
        

Reply
#5
(09-05-2017, 02:32 AM)senona Wrote: I haven't heard anything about it hitting N.Y.

Mainly the Florida coast and whether or not it stays in the Atlantic or goes into the Gulf.
To early to tell just yet.

This is from NOAA.....looks like we'll know more come the weekend, whether it starts turning northward or keeps going west.
Personally, I don't like the way the prediction is looking at the moment.  tinycrying
Poor Floridans, they will catch it either way looks like.

I have friends and family in FL, you in LA along with another friend down there, and family and friends in NC.  So, wherever it goes, it's going to worry me for everyone's safety. tinycrying




Reply
#6
I remember after we moved from N.J. to Alabama in '77, we experienced our first hurricane and that was Frederick of '79.


The damn wind NEVER stopped howling.
Mom had us get under the stairwell at one point.

I know it changed the whole landscape around there after that.

Could see the Mobile Bay in some areas where before it was thick with old Oak trees. 
Which then led to more development in some areas.


To say our swimming pool was a glorified mess, would be an understatement.  tinysurprised



Anyhow, I pray for those that will be in Irma's path.
Hopefully it won't be us.

a.k.a. 'snarky412'
 
        

Reply
#7
Hurricane Irma is now a category 5 hurricane with sustained winds of 185 mph according to the National Hurricane Center. This is one of the strongest hurricanes in recorded history in the Atlantic. In fact, Irma is so strong that the hurricane is registering as earthquakes on seismometers (equipment that measures earthquakes) in Guadeloupe.

So why is this happening? According to Stephen Hicks (a seismologist at the University of Southampton), noise caused by the high winds and the movement of trees-transferring energy into the ground registers as low-pitch sounds that show up as small earthquakes. Some of the seismometers are also located close to the shoreline and can become contaminated (false earthquakes) by large waves generated by Irma. The frequency of the ‘earthquakes’ will increase as Irma nears land and grows in intensity.
[Image: FullSizeRender4.jpg]
[Image: FullSizeRender5.jpg]
Tweets from Stephen Hicks about Irma registering as earthquakes
It should be noted, Irma is not causing actual earthquakes. Earthquakes occur below the surface and there is no research showing a correlation between tropical cyclones and earthquakes. During intense tropical cyclones, it is common to see seismometers register earthquakes due to the winds associated with the tropical cyclone.

Irma Is So Intense It Is Registering As Earthquakes




Reply
#8
Look at Irma as NOAA flies into the eye of the storm at the 2:00 mark. minusculegoodjob 







Reply
#9
The path predicted for IRMA showed it most likely to go along the east coast of FL last time I checked. Now, it's heading more toward the west coast.
I don't think it will go into the Gulf before it makes landfall in FL, where it will begin to fall apart, but it sure looks like the powers that be are trying very hard to steer it that way!  It's all about destroying where our oil is, so they can jack up the price of gas, etc., while also working on their Agenda 21 program.   tinyok

Hurricane Irma churns toward Florida where cities brace for storm surges up to 15 feet




Reply
#10
In this video, one can see the feathery features, haze, and wave patterns commonly seen in a chem-trail* sprayed and electromagnetically zapped sky, appearing around the hurricanes and their paths. Lines of sprayed aerosols and wispy, feathery features easily recognizable as geoengineering material were spotted around the recent hurricanes.
Source
This video gets better and better as it goes.







Reply
#11
Once again, IRMA has outfoxed the weathermen. It is now predicted to hit Tampa, not Miami, leaving little time for the city to evacuate!

I made friends with someone online who lives in Tampa, but we lost contact when I left (for the most part) ATS. He was a regular poster on my thread(s) over there. I pray he and his family will get out and be safe.   tinycrying

Remember, you can keep up with this live view to see where the hurricanes are:  Watch Live Map

Quote:NAPLES, Fla. (AP) —
Hurricane Irma's leading edges whipped palm trees and kicked up the surf as the storm spun toward Florida with 125 mph winds Saturday on a projected new track that could put Tampa — not Miami — in the crosshairs.

Tampa has not taken a direct hit from a major hurricane in nearly a century.

The westward swing in the overnight forecast caught many people off guard along Florida's Gulf coast and triggered an abrupt shift in the storm preparations. A major round of evacuations was ordered in the Tampa area, and shelters there soon began filling up.
The window was closing fast for anyone wanting to escape before the arrival of the fearsome storm Sunday morning. Irma — at one time the most powerful hurricane ever recorded in the open Atlantic — left more than 20 people dead across the Caribbean.
"You need to leave — not tonight, not in an hour, right now," Gov. Rick Scott warned residents in Florida's evacuation zones, which encompassed a staggering 6.4 million people, or more than 1 in 4 people in the state.

For days, the forecast had made it look as if the Miami metropolitan area of 6 million people on Florida's Atlantic coast could get hit head-on with the catastrophic and long-dreaded Big One.
But that soon changed. Meteorologists predicted Irma's center would blow ashore Sunday morning in the perilously low-lying Florida Keys, then hit southwestern Florida and hug the state's western coast, plowing into the Tampa Bay area by Monday morning.
The Miami metro area could still get pounded with life-threatening hurricane winds.
Tampa has not been struck by a major hurricane since 1921, when its population was about 10,000, National Hurricane Center spokesman Dennis Feltgen said. Now the area has around 3 million people.

The new course threatens everything from Tampa Bay's bustling twin cities of Tampa and St. Petersburg to Naples' mansion- and yacht-lined canals, Sun City Center's retirement homes, and Sanibel Island's shell-filled beaches.
By late morning Saturday, however, few businesses in St. Petersburg and its barrier islands had put plywood or hurricane shutters on their windows, and some locals grumbled about the change in the forecast.

"For five days, we were told it was going to be on the east coast, and then 24 hours before it hits, we're now told it's coming up the west coast," said Jeff Beerbohm, a 52-year-old entrepreneur in St. Petersburg. "As usual, the weatherman, I don't know why they're paid."
Irma was chugging forward as a Category 3, with winds down considerably from their peak of 185 mph (300 kph) earlier in the week. But the hurricane was expected to strengthen again before hitting the Sunshine State.

Nearly the entire Florida coastline remained under hurricane watches and warnings, and leery residents watched a projected track that could still shift to spare, or savage, parts of the state.
Forecasters warned of storm surge as high as 15 feet.

"This is going to sneak up on people," said Jamie Rhome, head of the hurricane center's storm surge unit.
With the new forecast, Pinellas County, home to St. Petersburg, ordered 260,000 people to leave, while Georgia scaled back evacuation orders for some coastal residents. Motorists heading inland from the Tampa area were allowed to drive on the shoulders.


Read more.




Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)