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Pumped Dry
#1
Something to think about.

Where does water come from? Where does it go? What happens when you use more water than can be replaced?

Climate change is not what we should be afraid of. Our disregard for the basic elements of life, should be more of a concern.




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#2
I seem to remember not to long ago stories about Companies and rich dudes buying water rights and land with proven underground water deposits.... There are states where it is against the law to collect rain water...Eugenics 101 ? Seems like where ever you look the pony of survival is getting tired of carrying human kind thanks mostly to idiots in government. Wait until this winter and people start freezing to death because they can not afford to heat their homes. Things might get interesting ?
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#3
(08-11-2022, 11:38 PM)727Sky Wrote: I seem to remember not to long ago stories about Companies and rich dudes buying water rights and land with proven underground water deposits.... There are states where it is against the law to collect rain water...Eugenics 101 ? Seems like where ever you look the pony of survival is getting tired of carrying human kind thanks mostly to idiots in government. Wait until this winter and people start freezing to death because they can not afford to heat their homes. Things might get interesting ?

When I was a child, I thought as a child, and behaved as a child.

I remember reading a book when I was a child, that took place in a land where water had long been sparse, and it was worth more than gold. I thought at the time, that was the most ridiculous of plots, since being church mouse poor, the only thing that we had in abundance, was "water".

Now I know better, and I also know the affect that water can have on the planet. In its abundance and in its sparsity.

I always thought of Mars as almost fictional. A planet far, far, away. I never thought of it as perhaps a cautionary tale.
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#4
Looks like Mother Nature is trying to make up for the all the water we have wasted.
tinycool 



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#5
All the water on earth is still here, i don’t think we can destroy water.
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#6
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https://twitter.com/ClimateRealists/stat...9311556608 | https://www.newclimatemodel.com/


They stopped new reservoirs and now there's a water crisis.

They forced power stations to close and now there's an energy crisis.

They switched land to biofuels and now there's a food crisis.

Welcome to the green agenda.


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Keeping the country short of water is now government – and EU – policy
"The underlying aim was not to win the war but to use the conflict to create a constant state of destabilized perception in order to manage and control." ― Vladislav Yuryevich Surkov

JFK to 9/11: Everything Is a Rich Man's Trick

"The New World fell not to a sword but to a meme." – Daniel Quinn






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#7
(08-12-2022, 03:54 AM)Brotherman Wrote: All the water on earth is still here, i don’t think we can destroy water.

Safe drinking water is being destroy by the gallons. There are very few things that are manufactured without the use of water. That water is removed from the water cycle.

The only water that can be produced on this planet, already is on this planet. We don't manufacture water, and it does not come from outer space. Rain water is recycled water. Our water supply is not unlimited.
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#8
(08-12-2022, 04:24 AM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote:
(08-12-2022, 03:54 AM)Brotherman Wrote: All the water on earth is still here, i don’t think we can destroy water.

Safe drinking water is being destroy by the gallons. There are very few things that are manufactured without the use of water. That water is removed from the water cycle.

The only water that can be produced on this planet, already is on this planet. We don't manufacture water, and it does not come from outer space. Rain water is recycled water. Our water supply is not unlimited.

I didn’t mention pollution on purpose. All i am saying is that all the water that was here before is still here polluted or not. I don’t necessarily disagree with you was just postulating i suppose.
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#9
(08-12-2022, 04:34 AM)Brotherman Wrote:
(08-12-2022, 04:24 AM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote:
(08-12-2022, 03:54 AM)Brotherman Wrote: All the water on earth is still here, i don’t think we can destroy water.

Safe drinking water is being destroy by the gallons. There are very few things that are manufactured without the use of water. That water is removed from the water cycle.

The only water that can be produced on this planet, already is on this planet. We don't manufacture water, and it does not come from outer space. Rain water is recycled water. Our water supply is not unlimited.

I didn’t mention pollution on purpose. All i am saying is that all the water that was here before is still here polluted or not. I don’t necessarily disagree with you was just postulating i suppose.

Pollution is indeed a problem, but water used in building and manufacturing may be be here, but not in it's original form, and is unusable as water. 

You can't drink it, you can't use it for anything that requires water.

Try to get water out a brick, or any other manufactured product. If you could reclaim the water, you would have to use 100 times the water in the process.

But you don't have to agree with me. It is not required.

minusculebeercheers
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#10


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#11
You never miss your water until the well runs dry.

Wells are running dry. The most interesting part of this video for me, was when it was said it happened, because no one was paying attention, until things got so bad, they could no longer be ignored.

People relying on drinking water by truck delivery, looked like something that is commonly seen in third world countries. I always thought those statements referring to California as a third world country was just hyperbole, maybe they were closer to the truth than I wanted to believe.




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#12
Quote:Drought Punishes West Anew as US Cuts Colorado River Water

Aug. 16, 2022, 5:03 PM; Updated: Aug. 16, 2022, 6:36 PM
  • Arizona to see 21% cutback in Colorado River allocation
  • States need annual water savings equal to Lake Okeechobee
A second round of drastic water cuts from the Colorado River is set to hit Arizona, Nevada, and Mexico as climate change-driven drought deepens the water shortage in the Southwest, the Interior Department announced Tuesday.

The Bureau of Reclamation called for all seven Colorado River Basin states to conserve water over the next four years and said it will withhold 21% of Arizona’s annual allocation of Colorado River water in 2023 as the first-ever water shortage in the Colorado River Basin continues for another year, the agency said.
The response from Arizona, which is taking the brunt of the cuts and earlier proposed to join neighboring states and Mexico in reducing water use by 2 million acre-feet, was swift.

The states need to save so much water—4.2 million acre-feet— that the savings would fill Lake Okeechobee each year, the bureau said. Lakes Mead and Powell—reservoirs on the Colorado River that supply the Southwest with water and hydropower—are together at 28% of their capacity, the agency said.

The 2023 cuts, called “water savings contributions,” are based on existing agreements developed by Congress and are coming initially from Lake Mead, the agency said. They also include an 8% cut to the state of Nevada, and a 7% cut in Mexico’s share of the river water.

The drought isn’t yet severe enough for California to lose its share yet, the agency said.

The Colorado River is the source of water for 40 million people between Denver and Los Angeles.

Failure to Plan

The cuts and the bureau’s basin-wide call for conservation over the next four years come after the Colorado River Basin states themselves failed to devise their own plan to conserve water. The bureau asked the states in June to develop a long-term water conservation plan by mid-August, but negotiations have reached an impasse.
“States have not collectively identified and adopted specific actions of significant magnitude that wold stabilize the system,” Camille Touton, Bureau of Reclamation commissioner, told reporters Tuesday.

Touton declined to say whether the bureau will impose mandatory water conservation measures in all seven basin states each year through 2026.
“Today we’re starting the process, and more information will follow,” Touton said, adding that the agency is pushing the states to reach a “consensus solution” through collaboration.

Intensified by Climate Change

Human-caused climate change has intensified the West’s extreme 23-year drought, which is responsible for rising temperatures, megafires burning large swaths of forest, drying up streams, and making the Rocky Mountain snowpack’s ability to feed the Colorado River more uncertain.

“The system is approaching a tipping point,” Touton said, adding that protecting existing Colorado River infrastructure is one of the Biden administration’s highest priorities even as the drought could render the reservoirs unable to withstand the ravages of climate change.

The drought and the historically low levels of lakes Powell and Mead—threatening their ability to generate hydropower— have prompted the bureau to call for water conservation measures through 2026 in all seven states in the Colorado River Basin.

The bureau is forcing water allocation cuts to ensure Lake Powell doesn’t drop so low it can’t generate hydropower, Touton said.

Water Shortage

The bureau previously declared a water shortage on the Colorado River in May, withholding 480,000 acre feet of water in Lake Powell, a reservoir that collects water from Rocky Mountain states and sends it to California, Arizona and Nevada. Arizona’s cut in 2023 will be 592,000 acre-feet of water.

The bureau may withhold more water in Lake Powell in 2023 depending on drought conditions in the region. Officials will make that determination in April 2023.
Over the next four years, the Bureau of Reclamation said it is likely to reduce the water it releases from Lake Powell to keep the lake from dropping any further, and the agency will study whether Glen Canyon Dam on Lake Powell and Hoover Dam on Lake Mead can be modified to allow water to be released at lower lake levels.
“Every sector in every state has a responsibility to ensure that water is used with maximum efficiency. In order to avoid a catastrophic collapse of the Colorado River System and a future of uncertainty and conflict, water use in the Basin must be reduced,” Tanya Trujillo, assistant Interior secretary for water and science, said in a statement.

State Tensions Rising

The response suggested that tensions are quickly rising between the Upper Basin states of Arizona, California and Nevada, and the Upper Basin states of Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.

“It is unacceptable for Arizona to continue to carry a disproportionate burden of reductions for the benefit of others who have not contributed,” Arizona Department of Water Resources Director Tom Buschatzke and Central Arizona Project General Manager Ted Cook said in a joint statement.

The basin states haven’t produced a viable water conservation plan, nor has the Bureau of Reclamation, they said.

“Exactly nothing in terms of meaningful collective action” occurred among all seven states since June to achieve a voluntary solution to avoid federal cuts, John Entsminger, general manager of the Southern Nevada Water Authority, said in a statement.

But each of the basin states need to come together to conserve water, he said.

“The magnitude of the problem is so large that every single water user in every single sector must contribute solutions to this problem,” Entsminger said.
He added that California, Arizona, and Nevada carry the biggest responsibility for water conservation because most of the people in the basin live there.
Western Democrats fought to secure $4 billion in additional drought resiliency funding in the tax, climate, and health legislation (H.R. 5376) that President Joe Biden will sign into law Tuesday. That money could help ease some of the pain the Upper and Lower Basin states are facing.

The 2021 bipartisan infrastructure law (Public Law 117-58) also included $8.3 billion for Reclamation to upgrade water delivery systems, invest in water recycling, and address drought.

A new gestapo agency (paid for by the taxpayers) will be created to enforce water rations on the peasants.

Lake Mead usage:

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"The underlying aim was not to win the war but to use the conflict to create a constant state of destabilized perception in order to manage and control." ― Vladislav Yuryevich Surkov

JFK to 9/11: Everything Is a Rich Man's Trick

"The New World fell not to a sword but to a meme." – Daniel Quinn






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#13
I have an idea that will kill a number of birds with one stone, desalination.

With global warming raising the sea levels, pump that water out, distill it and sell the fresh water as well as the sea salt for culinary use or for use on northern roads during the winter. Just want to dispose of it? Put it back into the old salt mines like under Detroit, it works for radioactive waste.

Now use that desal water for the most water heavy applications like irrigation, sewage and industrial use. Reuse the waste water if possible, otherwise allow it to return to the ground and the air. If done properly, this could replenish rivers and aquifers as well as produce more rain clouds to help ease droughts and wild fires.

Given California has a large coast line and is a dry desert type state, given enough desalination plants they could inject the water into the system at the most populous coastal cities and get benefits right away. As sunny as it is in California, solar desalination plants sound feasible as well.

However, even though they want everyone to drive electric cars, conserve water and use alternative energy sources, they are going to find reasons it isn't going to work.
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#14
Then there is this:

Quote:Aug. 15, 2022 – It’s unsafe to drink rainwater due to the ongoing presence of “forever chemicals,” according to a new study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Researchers found major environmental contamination of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, which are human-made chemicals used in numerous products, such as food packaging and waterproof clothing. The chemicals can spread in the atmosphere and are now found across the globe, including in rainwater, snow, soil, and even human blood.

PFAS are called “forever chemicals” because they can last for thousands of years. Various health conditions have been linked to PFAS contamination, including cancer, infertility, pregnancy complications, learning and behavior problems in children, immune system issues, and higher cholesterol, the researchers wrote.
During the last 20 years, countries have decreased their recommended limits for PFAS in drinking water, surface water, and soil due to new insights about their toxic nature, the researchers wrote. As a result, the levels in the environment are now higher than the recommended guidelines.

https://www.webmd.com/cancer/news/20220815/rainwater-unsafe-to-drink-forever-chemicals-study

And then there is this:

Quote:I've Been Drinking Rainwater the Past 2 Years. Is It Time To Stop?

Recent studies find all rainwater may be unsafe to drink, according to the latest health advisories for levels of PFAS, also known as "forever chemicals."

https://www.cnet.com/science/ive-been-drinking-rainwater-the-past-2-years-is-it-time-to-stop/

Now it looks like they want you to believe everything is going to kill you.

The planet has been made hostile, so now we adapt or die.

I say drink booze.
minusculebeercheers
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#15
(08-12-2022, 03:54 AM)Brotherman Wrote: All the water on earth is still here, i don’t think we can destroy water.

Ding Ding Ding ... we have a WINNER!!
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#16
(08-17-2022, 11:09 PM)Snarl Wrote:
(08-12-2022, 03:54 AM)Brotherman Wrote: All the water on earth is still here, i don’t think we can destroy water.

Ding Ding Ding ... we have a WINNER!!

The question is can you drink it, and will you have it when you want it or need it?
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