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Merchandise and Food Shortages in a National Crisis
#41
(05-23-2022, 06:32 PM)Ninurta Wrote:
(05-23-2022, 08:52 AM)Bally002 Wrote: [quote pid='85610' dateline='1653234263']
@Bally002  I heard an enlightened Guru once said that before enlightenment comes the secret is to chop wood, fetch water! And the secret for when enlightenment has already come is to chop wood, fetch water ok! minusculebeercheers


Tick that box each day okay!


minusculebeercheers

@OmegaLogos

That explains a lot.

When I was a teenager, I chopped wood and fetched water. A lot. Hauled logs out of the forest by horse-power, or if the brush was too dense for a horse, then by Ninurta-power. Then we cut them into chunks and I split the chunks with a double-bitted axe. It warmed you 3 times that way - when you brought it out of the woods, when you split it, and finally when you burned it.

I fetched water 12 gallons at a time, in 1 gallon milk jugs tied into twos. I criss-crossed the binding ties of two pairs of jugs into an "X" so that I could carry 4 gallons in each hand, with 4 more over my shoulders, two draped across each shoulder. And I carried it like that for about a mile or so from the spring I got it from.

I was "enlightened" back then, from that...

... but then I got old, stopped doing it, and got all stupid again.

.
[/quote]

@Ninurta
To put things into perspective from my end and I do appreciate 'those' days as you outlined.  I had to go away from chopping wood by hand.  The axe and block splitter play havoc nowadays with my shoulders and wrists.  Hence after the fires pretty well wiped us out I invested in a good hydraulic log splitter, a couple of finer chainsaws and a small but tough 4 x 4 ute.  We drag the timber into a cleared area, I cut and load, 'true love' operates the splitter.  The ute is loaded and we deliver and unload for our clients.  So it's a bit of pocket money.  The hard woods here can be a pain for hand cutting with an axe or cross saw.  We tend to keep our hearth going 24/7 during these days so we load up inside the house as well to keep the cuts dry.

As for water, presently I have plenty, dams are full, creeks flowing and tanks overflowing.  My problem is pressure since the 'header' tank burnt down and power at times can be a problem.   For cleaning, mopping, washing etc we use water from a tap outside on a reserve tank and bucket that in,  I also use it for the kettle on the hearth.  Our inside drinking and bathing water comes from the main tank and while it on occasions has run dry it hasn't for a while now due to all the rain, which is good for the gardens and poultry outside.  No more fetching in that sense.  

So it's not like the old days as we have a few creature comforts and machinery to make it easier but each day there is a little of those tasks and we like it that way.  We have an AA meeting each night at home where we consume a rather large amount of bourbon and frothies and discuss the days work over a feed.  My only complaint is the chore I hate - replacing a gas bottle and restarting the gas system.  Fucker never starts up in the rain.  Many a singed eye brows and beard.  

Kind regards,

Bally :)
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#42
(05-23-2022, 01:04 PM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote:
(05-23-2022, 08:52 AM)Bally002 Wrote: [quote pid='85610' dateline='1653234263']
@Bally002  I heard an enlightened Guru once said that before enlightenment comes the secret is to chop wood, fetch water! And the secret for when enlightenment has already come is to chop wood, fetch water ok! minusculebeercheers


Tick that box each day okay!


minusculebeercheers

@OmegaLogos

And life goes on. Knowing the sun will rise in the morning and will set when the day is done, will not stop the birds from singing.

I love the sound of birds singing at night.

[/quote]
Nice comment.  Spring is the better time for birds at night here, the Pheasant Coucal with it's continuous 'woop woop'  mating call going all night, owls, wagtails, plovers and other life in the trees.  Goes throughout summer too but this year with never ending rain very little is heard.
The Butcher birds, Magpies, Satin Bower birds and parrots still meet us each morning on the back verandah (drying off) for a feed and later in the day.  Lately there's a lot and fights start and we laugh when we watch the top tier birds chase the others away and the minors swoop in for a quick pick.  It doesn't end there though as the crows take to the smaller birds in flight carrying a bit of food attempting to make them drop it and so it continues for about an hour.  Of course the chooks and goose patrol the ground and scavenge up the crumbs and the pecking order goes on in that dimension.
During the day the Butcher birds and Kookaburras follow us as we split wood, perch on the periphery, and go for the grubs and wood insects as each log is split open.  Some good sights at times.  The birds alert us to any snakes and lizards nearby when they change their tones and dive at the reptiles location.  
One sight I saw, which I think maybe unusual, was when a Peregrine Falcon hit the large white goose in the back yard.  White feathers everywhere but the old goose just got up, flapped and hissed.  The falcon flew up onto the roof guttering shaking it's head looking dazed.  I am not sure of a falcon's perspective and I know they are fast but attacking another bird perhaps three times it's size may me wonder how the 'F' it would carry the goose away.  The were several chickens about at the time which would have made easier targets.  Anyway the falcon then flew up into a tree, meanwhile the chickens huddled under the house but the old goose just continued on as if nothing had happened.
Another sight is the flocks of wood ducks on the property.  Have never seen so many.  They cover the yard and dams at times.  Might be the wet weather.  Lots of little ones hatching.  Making me think I'll restock the dams with fish and yabbies.  
Kind regards,
Bally :)
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#43
(05-23-2022, 10:39 PM)Bally002 Wrote: Nice comment.  Spring is the better time for birds at night here, the Pheasant Coucal with it's continuous 'woop woop'  mating call going all night, owls, wagtails, plovers and other life in the trees.  Goes throughout summer too but this year with never ending rain very little is heard.
The Butcher birds, Magpies, Satin Bower birds and parrots still meet us each morning on the back verandah (drying off) for a feed and later in the day.  Lately there's a lot and fights start and we laugh when we watch the top tier birds chase the others away and the minors swoop in for a quick pick.  It doesn't end there though as the crows take to the smaller birds in flight carrying a bit of food attempting to make them drop it and so it continues for about an hour.  Of course the chooks and goose patrol the ground and scavenge up the crumbs and the pecking order goes on in that dimension.
During the day the Butcher birds and Kookaburras follow us as we split wood, perch on the periphery, and go for the grubs and wood insects as each log is split open.  Some good sights at times.  The birds alert us to any snakes and lizards nearby when they change their tones and dive at the reptiles location.  
One sight I saw, which I think maybe unusual, was when a Peregrine Falcon hit the large white goose in the back yard.  White feathers everywhere but the old goose just got up, flapped and hissed.  The falcon flew up onto the roof guttering shaking it's head looking dazed.  I am not sure of a falcon's perspective and I know they are fast but attacking another bird perhaps three times it's size may me wonder how the 'F' it would carry the goose away.  The were several chickens about at the time which would have made easier targets.  Anyway the falcon then flew up into a tree, meanwhile the chickens huddled under the house but the old goose just continued on as if nothing had happened.
Another sight is the flocks of wood ducks on the property.  Have never seen so many.  They cover the yard and dams at times.  Might be the wet weather.  Lots of little ones hatching.  Making me think I'll restock the dams with fish and yabbies.  
Kind regards,
Bally :)

Not to derail MSB's thread, but your post reminded me of the time, about twenty years ago. I was on the back porch, talking to the water guy. I was pointing to where the well is, when all of the sudden this hawk swooped down and tried to pluck a squirrel from the side of a tree. The tree was right behind the well, so we got a grand view of the whole thing.

He was either young, had poor sight, gauged wrong, or was drunk. He caught the squirrel, but it got away, after he knocked himself out by hitting the tree. He was out for only a couple of seconds, and flew off, minus one squirrel, dazed, and with a headache.

I always smile when people talk about how quiet it as to be living in the woods. They have obviously never spent any time in the woods, because quiet it is not. The only time it is quiet is when danger is around.

When it rains the fifty different varieties of frogs hold a concert, and they battle for the title of "The Finest Frog Group In The Woods".

It is loud, Damn loud.
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#44
(05-23-2022, 11:49 PM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote:
(05-23-2022, 10:39 PM)Bally002 Wrote: Nice comment.  Spring is the better time for birds at night here, the Pheasant Coucal with it's continuous 'woop woop'  mating call going all night, owls, wagtails, plovers and other life in the trees.  Goes throughout summer too but this year with never ending rain very little is heard.
The Butcher birds, Magpies, Satin Bower birds and parrots still meet us each morning on the back verandah (drying off) for a feed and later in the day.  Lately there's a lot and fights start and we laugh when we watch the top tier birds chase the others away and the minors swoop in for a quick pick.  It doesn't end there though as the crows take to the smaller birds in flight carrying a bit of food attempting to make them drop it and so it continues for about an hour.  Of course the chooks and goose patrol the ground and scavenge up the crumbs and the pecking order goes on in that dimension.
During the day the Butcher birds and Kookaburras follow us as we split wood, perch on the periphery, and go for the grubs and wood insects as each log is split open.  Some good sights at times.  The birds alert us to any snakes and lizards nearby when they change their tones and dive at the reptiles location.  
One sight I saw, which I think maybe unusual, was when a Peregrine Falcon hit the large white goose in the back yard.  White feathers everywhere but the old goose just got up, flapped and hissed.  The falcon flew up onto the roof guttering shaking it's head looking dazed.  I am not sure of a falcon's perspective and I know they are fast but attacking another bird perhaps three times it's size may me wonder how the 'F' it would carry the goose away.  The were several chickens about at the time which would have made easier targets.  Anyway the falcon then flew up into a tree, meanwhile the chickens huddled under the house but the old goose just continued on as if nothing had happened.
Another sight is the flocks of wood ducks on the property.  Have never seen so many.  They cover the yard and dams at times.  Might be the wet weather.  Lots of little ones hatching.  Making me think I'll restock the dams with fish and yabbies.  
Kind regards,
Bally :)

Not to derail MSB's thread, but your post reminded me of the time, about twenty years ago. I was on the back porch, talking to the water guy. I was pointing to where the well is, when all of the sudden this hawk swooped down and tried to pluck a squirrel from the side of a tree. The tree was right behind the well, so we got a grand view of the whole thing.

He was either young, had poor sight, gauged wrong, or was drunk. He caught the squirrel, but it got away, after he knocked himself out by hitting the tree. He was out for only a couple of seconds, and flew off, minus one squirrel, dazed, and with a headache.

I always smile when people talk about how quiet it as to be living in the woods. They have obviously never spent any time in the woods, because quiet it is not. The only time it is quiet is when danger is around.

When it rains the fifty different varieties of frogs hold a concert, and they battle for the title of "The Finest Frog Group In The Woods".

It is loud, Damn loud.

I don't think you are derailing.  It's important in my thoughts that if your have the apex predators and substantial food sources provided for them, in the environment, then you are surrounded by a healthy habitat which tends to lead itself to survival and sustainability.  

I am not a nature freak and will quite happily cut out a big hardwood tree if it suits me but I don't waste it.  I can adjust if food gets short and will set traps (illegal here) and cull out the ducks if the larder got low.  I am partial to wildlife flavors especially rabbit.  (few and far between here).  Will eat yabbies, eel and fish from the dams and creek and if it came down to it would certainly take out a kangaroo, potaroo or wallaby if needs be. Partial to a bit of goanna and python.

There is some edible native vegetation  and of course my sad veg garden.  I can thank my long dead dad for teaching me these basic skills which you can fall back into if it got that way like the depression before WW2.  It's a pity I couldn't teach my children these needs as it is not permitted in the stricter sense.  Most wildlife is protected but I can get away with it out here.  They are all 'growed' up now but they know how to cut wood, haul water, grow plants and cook.  And surprise, they will travel a ways to return to the selection (farm) for a break and get back into a little work around the place.  

If the SHTF, well we'll see maybe, then I reckon, with the resources here we'll manage for a while and nature is a part of that.  The birds and bees are a good indication.

Again,

My thoughts and kind regards,

Bally :)
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#45
It has begun. 

The last few days of just running to the local convenience store , gas had jumped up to $ 4.59 and they have been out of gas for 3 days so far. 

Hardly any traffic on the roads. It's getting there.
The Truth is Out There, Somewhere
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#46
(05-24-2022, 12:37 AM)kdog Wrote: It has begun. 

The last few days of just running to the local convenience store , gas had jumped up to $ 4.59 and they have been out of gas for 3 days so far. 

Hardly any traffic on the roads. It's getting there.

Local gas is:
Regular $4.59 to  $4.65
Mid $4.85 to $5.09
Premium $5.19 to $5.39

I was shocked to find eggs in the local stores ranging from $4.35 to $8.75 a carton. I give away about twenty two dozen eggs a week. And quite a few of the people I know, and neighbors, have plenty of eggs, and they give theirs away as well. That may be why the stores sell theirs for so much.

I have noticed an increase not just in the price of goods, but much smaller packaging, and a change in the formulas in a lot of products. Many products have more water in them, and whatever they have done to the Pedigree dog food, it has caused my dogs to have loose stools. I have gone to making my own dog food.

But you are right. It has begun.
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#47
(05-24-2022, 01:15 AM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote:
(05-24-2022, 12:37 AM)kdog Wrote: It has begun. 

The last few days of just running to the local convenience store , gas had jumped up to $ 4.59 and they have been out of gas for 3 days so far. 

Hardly any traffic on the roads. It's getting there.

Local gas is:
Regular $4.59 to  $4.65
Mid $4.85 to $5.09
Premium $5.19 to $5.39

I was shocked to find eggs in the local stores ranging from $4.35 to $8.75 a carton. I give away about twenty two dozen eggs a week. And quite a few of the people I know, and neighbors, have plenty of eggs, and they give theirs away as well. That may be why the stores sell theirs for so much.

I have noticed an increase not just in the price of goods, but much smaller packaging, and a change in the formulas in a lot of products. Many products have more water in them, and whatever they have done to the Pedigree dog food, it has caused my dogs to have loose stools. I have gone to making my own dog food.

But you are right. It has begun.

I've noticed the price of noodles, pasta and rice has basically doubled.  Am I wrong in Australia.

Starting to pickle and dehydrate stuff.  That ain't illegal here yet.

I hope things settle down.

Kind regards,
Bally :)
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#48
(05-24-2022, 01:15 AM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote:
(05-24-2022, 12:37 AM)kdog Wrote: It has begun. 

The last few days of just running to the local convenience store , gas had jumped up to $ 4.59 and they have been out of gas for 3 days so far. 

Hardly any traffic on the roads. It's getting there.

Local gas is:
Regular $4.59 to  $4.65
Mid $4.85 to $5.09
Premium $5.19 to $5.39

I was shocked to find eggs in the local stores ranging from $4.35 to $8.75 a carton. I give away about twenty two dozen eggs a week. And quite a few of the people I know, and neighbors, have plenty of eggs, and they give theirs away as well. That may be why the stores sell theirs for so much.

I have noticed an increase not just in the price of goods, but much smaller packaging, and a change in the formulas in a lot of products. Many products have more water in them, and whatever they have done to the Pedigree dog food, it has caused my dogs to have loose stools. I have gone to making my own dog food.

But you are right. It has begun.

Just boil your eggs and pickle them.  Vinegar, a little salt and pepper afterwards is your brother/mother in this process.  Save your glass jars too.  Place the eggs in glass with vinegar.  Don't rely on plastics.  Place them away in a cool location and you'll know if you've done right as the lids require a wrench to open for us weak wristers.  

Thoughts as I love farm eggs,

Bally :)
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#49
(05-24-2022, 03:49 AM)Bally002 Wrote: Just boil your eggs and pickle them.  Vinegar, a little salt and pepper afterwards is your brother/mother in this process.  Save your glass jars too.  Place the eggs in glass with vinegar.  Don't relay on plastics.  Place them away in a cool location and you'll know if you've done right as the lids require a wrench to open for us weak wristers.  

Thoughts as I love farm eggs,

Bally :)

Great idea! I never thought about that!

The chickens belong to my brother. He is religious about his chickens. No table scraps. No GMOs. Everyone of them have a name, and they are spoiled little rascals. Mother, my brother, and my nephew do most of the work. I just give them away.

His chickens lay between 35 or 40 eggs a day. A good portion of them have double yolks.
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#50
(05-24-2022, 03:57 AM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote:
(05-24-2022, 03:49 AM)Bally002 Wrote: Just boil your eggs and pickle them.  Vinegar, a little salt and pepper afterwards is your brother/mother in this process.  Save your glass jars too.  Place the eggs in glass with vinegar.  Don't relay on plastics.  Place them away in a cool location and you'll know if you've done right as the lids require a wrench to open for us weak wristers.  

Thoughts as I love farm eggs,

Bally :)

Great idea! I never thought about that!

The chickens belong to my brother. He is religious about his chickens. No table scraps. No GMOs. Everyone of them have a name, and they are spoiled little rascals. Mother, my brother, and my nephew do most of the work. I just give them away.

His chickens lay between 35 or 40 eggs a day. A good portion of them have double yolks.

I simply let my chooks (chickens) roam.  The only time I pen them up is when I plant.

Boil the eggs hard.  10 minutes most.  Let them cool.  Peel the shell.  Have a glass jar (sterilized) open and ready. (No shell or pieces thereof).  Pour raw vinegar about one third to the jar.  Place cooled eggs into the concoction.  When topping up, then ensure your eggs are covered with fluid.  Before capping with lid, (tricky part here) then heat in microwave for 30 secs.  No longer,

Mit gloves,  remove (so the glass doesn't burn your hands.)  

Place sterilized lid on.

Doesn't matter how large your glass jar is or what spicy recipe you use.  As long as you put the glass container into a spot out of the sun and leave it to brew for about 2 weeks. 

Your hard boiled eggs will taste epic.  Great for salads when sliced.

Easy Peasy.  Save your glass jars.

Kind regards,

Bally :)
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#51
My brother pens his chickens at night, because they go to the coop to roost.

He opens the coop in the morning and they free roam, but they come back to the coop every night.

Rocky is there to protect them during the day, but we have a lot of sneaky, little critters that like to roam in the woods at night, and chicken is at the top of there menu.

He was had an encounter or two with a bold coyote, and a bold hawk, but they both went away empty handed.

He had one hen that didn't make it home one night. We have no idea where she went, but she came home a couple days later. She was sure happy to be back home. We were happy she came back, fit and sound.

I found a rooster, about a mile from my home, caught up in some brambles. I set him free. I hope he made it home. He wasn't one of ours. It was the weirdest thing hearing his distress call in the middle of nowhere. I was really surprised that he was just fine when I found him. 

He was a big beautiful boy. He would have been a prize for any of the critters that call those woods home.

I am going to try your recipe. I have to go into town tomorrow, I hope I can find some glass jars.
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#52
I can't be certain, but I believe that the Amish won't do too badly or much worse at least in all this. I see them in town shopping for things some times, but I never paid mind to what they were buying.

They need clothes, shoes, eyeglasses, health care, and many of the same things regular folks need, but they do provide much for themselves from farming, lumber mills, making furniture and wood working, black smith work, they have their own schools, etc.
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#53
(05-24-2022, 04:37 AM)Michigan Swamp Buck Wrote: I can't be certain, but I believe that the Amish won't do too badly or much worse at least in all this. I see them in town shopping for things some times, but I never paid mind to what they were buying.

They need clothes, shoes, eyeglasses, health care, and many of the same things regular folks need, but they do provide much for themselves from farming, lumber mills, making furniture and wood working, black smith work, they have their own schools, etc.

I admire this.  While they appear a little back woods in my perspective, they have their finger on the 'pulse'.  They will survive.

Rest of us, well. determines, how we deal with changes.

Bally :)
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#54
https://t.me/conspiranews/2566

In Canada, a train with 43 wagons of potassium nitrate derailed.
в ближайшем будущем во всем мире  потребление сильно упадет (включая сокращение продуктов питания)  ... Кто будет возражать -  будуть  закрывать рот силой...  Причем аргументация будет -   экологической... Разумная земля (природа, ноосфера) - важнее человека...

28 07 19|14 = 68
01 09 19|39 = 68
24 02 20|22 = 68
I need to figure out what does 68 means
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#55
(05-25-2022, 09:15 AM)SimeonJ Wrote: https://t.me/conspiranews/2566

In Canada, a train with 43 wagons of potassium nitrate derailed.

What a shame. It has so many uses - fertilizer, making gunpowder, removing tree stumps...

.
“The nature of psychological compulsion is such that those who act under constraint remain under the impression that they are acting on their own initiative. The victim of mind-manipulation does not know that he is a victim. To him the walls of his prison are invisible, and he believes himself to be free. That he is not free is apparent only to other people.”

-Aldous Huxley

-- Got mask? Just sayin'...




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#56
I'll finish reading through, so this may have already been said:

My biggest fear, or for that matter, the one thing I would be terrified if a shortage were to occur, is the Balvenie 21  tinywondering

All joking aside, that's a scary list of stuff we all take for granted.
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#57
(05-24-2022, 04:45 AM)Bally002 Wrote:
(05-24-2022, 04:37 AM)Michigan Swamp Buck Wrote: I can't be certain, but I believe that the Amish won't do too badly or much worse at least in all this. I see them in town shopping for things some times, but I never paid mind to what they were buying.

They need clothes, shoes, eyeglasses, health care, and many of the same things regular folks need, but they do provide much for themselves from farming, lumber mills, making furniture and wood working, black smith work, they have their own schools, etc.

I admire this.  While they appear a little back woods in my perspective, they have their finger on the 'pulse'.  They will survive.

I had a good conversation with an Amish fella two days ago.  I went to the archery store too buy a new bow and he was there looking for reloading supplies. The shop is anti-political (they hate everyone in politics ... know they're all corrupt).

I was surprised how in-tune this Amish fella was.  I listened to him talk to the owner for 20 minutes on the way things are politically.  His bottom line was that the Amish would probably survive in there was no dedicated backlash targeted against them for being capable of surviving any shit-storm the Biden/0bama administration has in store for the country.

Cheers mate!!
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#58
(05-25-2022, 11:24 PM)DuckforcoveR Wrote: the Balvenie 21

Bang for the buck remains with the 12YO.
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#59
(05-25-2022, 09:20 PM)Ninurta Wrote:
(05-25-2022, 09:15 AM)SimeonJ Wrote: https://t.me/conspiranews/2566

In Canada, a train with 43 wagons of potassium nitrate derailed.

What a shame. It has so many uses - fertilizer, making gunpowder, removing tree stumps...

.

Yeah, I like potassium perchlorate much better, the chlorates are all pretty good. Of course sodium nitrate is salt peter (tee-hee) used for meat preservation and as a libido reduction treatment in the military, prisons and mental institutions (an urban legend I'm afraid).
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#60


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