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Merchandise and Food Shortages in a National Crisis
#81
Okay @Bally002, The first batch was a hit. Everyone in my Brothers household loved the pickled eggs.

I like them just fine, but I am going to tweak the next batch. My neighbor likes them, but he wants to try my next batch, which I am doing with the apple cider vinegar next time. He liked them so much, I left the house with a quart of fresh homemade tomato soup, a bag full of mangoes, and a half gallon of moringa tea.

My Brother wants me to put some of my Scotch Bonnet peppers in a batch.

The scotch bonnets show no mercy, so I will have to experiment with those devils before I risk wasting too many eggs on that request.

I have several pickle solution recipes running through my mind. According to the internet, the pickled eggs last for four months.

I plan to put some aside to store. I know I can glass them to preserve them as well, but I am really not that crazy about the glassing idea.

Anyways. Thanks for the idea. We get so many eggs sometimes, that we can't even give them away. Pickling them is a wonderful and very tasty way to keep them on hand.

Thanks for informing me of this method for storage.
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#82
(05-30-2022, 01:38 AM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote: ...

My Brother wants me to put some of my Scotch Bonnet peppers in a batch.

The scotch bonnets show no mercy, so I will have to experiment with those devils before I risk wasting too many eggs on that request.

I have several pickle solution recipes running through my mind. According to the internet, the pickled eggs last for four months.

The only think I will eat pickled are quail eggs, and I eat them pickled in a solution that includes habaneros and jalapenos.

Quote:I plan to put some aside to store. I know I can glass them to preserve them as well, but I am really not that crazy about the glassing idea.

Glassed eggs should keep for 8 months to a year, so I really thought pickling them should make them keep longer than that.

.
Diogenes was eating bread and lentils for supper. He was seen by the philosopher Aristippus, who lived comfortably by flattering the king.

Said Aristippus, ‘If you would learn to be subservient to the king you would not have to live on lentils.’ Said Diogenes, ‘Learn to live on lentils and you will not have to be subservient to the king.’


Reply
#83
(05-30-2022, 01:38 AM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote: Okay @Bally002, The first batch was a hit. Everyone in my Brothers household loved the pickled eggs.

I like them just fine, but I am going to tweak the next batch. My neighbor likes them, but he wants to try my next batch, which I am doing with the apple cider vinegar next time. He liked them so much, I left the house with a quart of fresh homemade tomato soup, a bag full of mangoes, and a half gallon of moringa tea.

My Brother wants me to put some of my Scotch Bonnet peppers in a batch.

The scotch bonnets show no mercy, so I will have to experiment with those devils before I risk wasting too many eggs on that request.

I have several pickle solution recipes running through my mind. According to the internet, the pickled eggs last for four months.

I plan to put some aside to store. I know I can glass them to preserve them as well, but I am really not that crazy about the glassing idea.

Anyways. Thanks for the idea. We get so many eggs sometimes, that we can't even give them away. Pickling them is a wonderful and very tasty way to keep them on hand.

Thanks for informing me of this method for storage.

You're welcome.  As @Ninurta mentions there is a further way to extend the life of your eggs by simply chopping up a chili and adding that to the mixture.  Be aware that there will be a hot twang to the eggs when you eat them.  On the outside leastways.

I prefer vinegar eggs with a pickled onion.  Sides would be fish and thick fries.  (called potato chips here.).  Another underrated vegetable to pickle is celery.  Pickled and later used with cheese and/or sour cream is quite yummy.  Pepper is the ingredient for this one.

Kind regards,

Bally :)
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#84
https://inews.co.uk/news/environment/edi...er-1657372

Edible insects: Scientists plan to feed primary school children locusts and mealworms to make the UK greener
в ближайшем будущем во всем мире  потребление сильно упадет (включая сокращение продуктов питания)  ... Кто будет возражать -  будуть  закрывать рот силой...  Причем аргументация будет -   экологической... Разумная земля (природа, ноосфера) - важнее человека...

28 07 19|14 = 68
01 09 19|39 = 68
24 02 20|22 = 68
I need to figure out what does 68 means
Reply
#85
(05-30-2022, 09:06 AM)Bally002 Wrote: Another underrated vegetable to pickle is celery.  Pickled and later used with cheese and/or sour cream is quite yummy.  Pepper is the ingrediat for this one.

Kind regards,

Bally :)

I have pickled celery before. First time was an attempt to save some that was leftover after making macaroni salad. It worked so well, that we do it on a regular basis now. 
minusculebeercheers
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#86
(05-30-2022, 11:06 AM)SimeonJ Wrote: https://inews.co.uk/news/environment/edi...er-1657372

Edible insects: Scientists plan to feed primary school children locusts and mealworms to make the UK greener

I have mixed feelings about this.

On one hand, if it gets them through a SHTF scenario, then it may be easier on the children if it is something familiar.

If it is just to put more dollars in the pockets of our oppressors, then I say home school your children.
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#87
(05-30-2022, 11:38 AM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote:
(05-30-2022, 11:06 AM)SimeonJ Wrote: https://inews.co.uk/news/environment/edi...er-1657372

Edible insects: Scientists plan to feed primary school children locusts and mealworms to make the UK greener

I have mixed feelings about this.

On one hand, if it gets them through a SHTF scenario, then it may be easier on the children if it is something familiar.

If it is just to put more dollars in the pockets of our oppressors, then I say home school your children.

Cicadas are the go in season around here.  Thousands of them.  Best ones are those that have just emerged but the flying ones are as good.  Remove wings and legs and cook them anyway you prefer.  Taste the same as witchetty grubs but the grubs are few and far between here and you have to compete with black cockatoos.
 
Those big black birds certainly know where to find them.

I find the grubs when splitting wood.  Generally feed them to the birds or the birds see them before me and are already poking their beaks into the logs as they are split.

Stinging nettle and young fern tips can be used to concoct a nice brew if boiled but again if push came to shove I'd drink that to replace coffee and tea.  I have a habit of eating jellied sap from the wattle trees if I spy it leaking from the trunk but about a mouthful is all I can take.  Like very soft tasteless toffee in it's consistency when chewed.  But a snack all the same.  

Eels are everywhere.  Dams and creeks.  Bit of line and baited hook will catch them out of any water hole.  Messy things they are but again, if needs be, you'll get a feed.

In short there is plenty to eat  as @SimeonJ mentioned.

Can't be fussy when you're hungry.

Kind regards,

Bally:)
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#88
I have read somewhere that the insects requires 6 time less food to produce 1 kilo of protein compared to the beef.
That's why they are promote it as a food.
в ближайшем будущем во всем мире  потребление сильно упадет (включая сокращение продуктов питания)  ... Кто будет возражать -  будуть  закрывать рот силой...  Причем аргументация будет -   экологической... Разумная земля (природа, ноосфера) - важнее человека...

28 07 19|14 = 68
01 09 19|39 = 68
24 02 20|22 = 68
I need to figure out what does 68 means
Reply
#89
(05-30-2022, 02:12 AM)Ninurta Wrote:
(05-30-2022, 01:38 AM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote: ...

My Brother wants me to put some of my Scotch Bonnet peppers in a batch.

The scotch bonnets show no mercy, so I will have to experiment with those devils before I risk wasting too many eggs on that request.

I have several pickle solution recipes running through my mind. According to the internet, the pickled eggs last for four months.

The only think I will eat pickled are quail eggs, and I eat them pickled in a solution that includes habaneros and jalapenos.

Quote:I plan to put some aside to store. I know I can glass them to preserve them as well, but I am really not that crazy about the glassing idea.

Glassed eggs should keep for 8 months to a year, so I really thought pickling them should make them keep longer than that.

.
I agree with @Ninurta here that glass jars with a screw type metal lid are the best for keeping pickled eggs in.  I like to place peppers or as Ninurta mentioned, habaneros and jalapenos are fine for several months storage.

Glass jars can be sterilized in boiling water which is all the better for the long term storage in vinegar.  

Find a jar and try it.  But, make sure the concoction is warm (not hot) when you screw the lid on. (no air if possible).    Then of course place it in a cool location for 6 months. (Date it)  Open and try your eggs.  If done right people will beat a path to your door.  

Let me know in 6 months.

Kind regards,

Bally.
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#90
(05-30-2022, 12:44 PM)Bally002 Wrote:
(05-30-2022, 02:12 AM)Ninurta Wrote:
(05-30-2022, 01:38 AM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote: ...

My Brother wants me to put some of my Scotch Bonnet peppers in a batch.

The scotch bonnets show no mercy, so I will have to experiment with those devils before I risk wasting too many eggs on that request.

I have several pickle solution recipes running through my mind. According to the internet, the pickled eggs last for four months.

The only think I will eat pickled are quail eggs, and I eat them pickled in a solution that includes habaneros and jalapenos.

Quote:I plan to put some aside to store. I know I can glass them to preserve them as well, but I am really not that crazy about the glassing idea.

Glassed eggs should keep for 8 months to a year, so I really thought pickling them should make them keep longer than that.

.
I agree with @Ninurta here that glass jars with a screw type metal lid are the best for keeping pickled eggs in.  I like to place peppers or as Ninurta mentioned, habaneros and jalapenos are fine for several months storage.

Glass jars can be sterilized in boiling water which is all the better for the long term storage in vinegar.  

Find a jar and try it.  But, make sure the concoction is warm (not hot) when you screw the lid on. (no air if possible).    Then of course place it in a cool location for 6 months. (Date it)  Open and try your eggs.  If done right people will beat a path to your door.  

Let me know in 6 months.

Kind regards,

Bally.

I am planning on making several different batches.

I like the batch I made several days ago, but it has opened up my mind to a lot of different possibilities.

My brother wants me to try the Scotch Bonnet pepper, and like I said, the little devil shows no mercy if you make a mistake. I throw one in the pot when cooking my rice sometimes, but you have to make sure the monster is still whole and intact after the rice is cooked, or you will have an uneatable pot of rice.

It only takes a microscopic portion of the pepper to spice up the dish a bit more if you want it spicier. I want to see the difference from the apple cider vinegar, and the white vinegar in the batches, and I will play with a few more spices, and with beets.

My Brother and neighbor are already waiting to be my taste testers, and my nephews are already ready pulling from the jar. Between the boys and my taste testers, I don't know it I will be able to make six months. I am definitely going to have to find a good hiding spot.

Looking for some large glass jars. The largest I have now are quart jars. I can only get ten eggs in each jar. Jars and canning equipment is not as easy to come by as before.

I grew up in a canning household. I am sorry we stopped doing that. I used to can applesauce. I had four pots on the stove daily when I was just a pre-teen. I could not keep up with the orders when apples were in season. My grandmother used to have a orchard, so we had apples in every state you can imagine the use of an apple.
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#91
Sharing video of glassed eggs test after twelve months.

I am a bit afraid of glassed eggs in Florida, it is hot more frequently than not. I live in the woods, and power outages are not rare in the woods, so keeping them cool for a year may be a challenged, and I can't stand the thought of destroying a bucket full of eggs.





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#92
(05-30-2022, 12:30 PM)Bally002 Wrote: Cicadas are the go in season around here.  Thousands of them.  Best ones are those that have just emerged but the flying ones are as good.  Remove wings and legs and cook them anyway you prefer.  Taste the same as witchetty grubs but the grubs are few and far between here and you have to compete with black cockatoos.
 
Those big black birds certainly know where to find them.

I find the grubs when splitting wood.  Generally feed them to the birds or the birds see them before me and are already poking their beaks into the logs as they are split.

Stinging nettle and young fern tips can be used to concoct a nice brew if boiled but again if push came to shove I'd drink that to replace coffee and tea.  I have a habit of eating jellied sap from the wattle trees if I spy it leaking from the trunk but about a mouthful is all I can take.  Like very soft tasteless toffee in it's consistency when chewed.  But a snack all the same.  

Eels are everywhere.  Dams and creeks.  Bit of line and baited hook will catch them out of any water hole.  Messy things they are but again, if needs be, you'll get a feed.

In short there is plenty to eat  as @SimeonJ mentioned.

Can't be fussy when you're hungry.

Kind regards,

Bally:)

Nothing new under the sun.

The Bible speaks of folk living on locust and wild honey.
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#93
(05-30-2022, 12:36 PM)SimeonJ Wrote: I have read somewhere that the insects requires 6 time less food to produce 1 kilo of protein compared to the beef.
That's why they are promote it as a food.

Based on the mush left behind after I squashed that giant wolf spider by the front door last night, those might be pretty juicy.
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#94
(05-30-2022, 11:06 AM)SimeonJ Wrote: https://inews.co.uk/news/environment/edi...er-1657372

Edible insects: Scientists plan to feed primary school children locusts and mealworms to make the UK greener

I would immediately pull my kids out of school and start homeschooling them. I didn't bust my ass for the last 50 years just so the government could make my kids eat bugs.

.
Diogenes was eating bread and lentils for supper. He was seen by the philosopher Aristippus, who lived comfortably by flattering the king.

Said Aristippus, ‘If you would learn to be subservient to the king you would not have to live on lentils.’ Said Diogenes, ‘Learn to live on lentils and you will not have to be subservient to the king.’


Reply
#95
(05-30-2022, 11:28 AM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote:
(05-30-2022, 09:06 AM)Bally002 Wrote: Another underrated vegetable to pickle is celery.  Pickled and later used with cheese and/or sour cream is quite yummy.  Pepper is the ingrediat for this one.

Kind regards,

Bally :)

I have pickled celery before. First time was an attempt to save some that was leftover after making macaroni salad. It worked so well, that we do it on a regular basis now. 
minusculebeercheers

My Dear Old Dad used to pickle corn in great big 5 gallon crockery pots. It's the smell of that corn pickling that turned me off to most pickled things. I never could eat it, because it would have had to pass under my nose to get into my mouth.

.
Diogenes was eating bread and lentils for supper. He was seen by the philosopher Aristippus, who lived comfortably by flattering the king.

Said Aristippus, ‘If you would learn to be subservient to the king you would not have to live on lentils.’ Said Diogenes, ‘Learn to live on lentils and you will not have to be subservient to the king.’


Reply
#96
(05-30-2022, 12:30 PM)Bally002 Wrote: Cicadas are the go in season around here.  Thousands of them.  Best ones are those that have just emerged but the flying ones are as good.  Remove wings and legs and cook them anyway you prefer.  Taste the same as witchetty grubs but the grubs are few and far between here and you have to compete with black cockatoos.
 
Those big black birds certainly know where to find them.

I find the grubs when splitting wood.  Generally feed them to the birds or the birds see them before me and are already poking their beaks into the logs as they are split.

Stinging nettle and young fern tips can be used to concoct a nice brew if boiled but again if push came to shove I'd drink that to replace coffee and tea.  I have a habit of eating jellied sap from the wattle trees if I spy it leaking from the trunk but about a mouthful is all I can take.  Like very soft tasteless toffee in it's consistency when chewed.  But a snack all the same.  

Eels are everywhere.  Dams and creeks.  Bit of line and baited hook will catch them out of any water hole.  Messy things they are but again, if needs be, you'll get a feed.

In short there is plenty to eat  as @SimeonJ mentioned.

Can't be fussy when you're hungry.

Kind regards,

Bally:)

Late last summer I noticed that someone had dropped a crawdad trap off my bridge and into the creek, In about two days time, they had collected 2 gallons or more of crawdads per trap.

I've eaten crawdads out of the creeks here. They look and taste just like miniature lobsters. I heavily salt some water and then boil them in it, and they turn just as red as any lobster you've ever seen. They're so tiny, though, not more than 4 to 6 inches long, that all the meat you can get out of one is in the tail and the claws.

.
Diogenes was eating bread and lentils for supper. He was seen by the philosopher Aristippus, who lived comfortably by flattering the king.

Said Aristippus, ‘If you would learn to be subservient to the king you would not have to live on lentils.’ Said Diogenes, ‘Learn to live on lentils and you will not have to be subservient to the king.’


Reply
#97
(05-30-2022, 09:00 PM)Ninurta Wrote:
(05-30-2022, 11:06 AM)SimeonJ Wrote: https://inews.co.uk/news/environment/edi...er-1657372

Edible insects: Scientists plan to feed primary school children locusts and mealworms to make the UK greener

I would immediately pull my kids out of school and start homeschooling them. I didn't bust my ass for the last 50 years just so the government could make my kids eat bugs.

.

Unfortunately in most European countries, not only EU, you are not allowed to do this.
в ближайшем будущем во всем мире  потребление сильно упадет (включая сокращение продуктов питания)  ... Кто будет возражать -  будуть  закрывать рот силой...  Причем аргументация будет -   экологической... Разумная земля (природа, ноосфера) - важнее человека...

28 07 19|14 = 68
01 09 19|39 = 68
24 02 20|22 = 68
I need to figure out what does 68 means
Reply
#98
(05-30-2022, 12:36 PM)SimeonJ Wrote: I have read somewhere that the insects requires 6 time less food to produce 1 kilo of protein compared to the beef.
That's why they are promote it as a food.

I suppose that might be a solution for some folks, especially folks that live in cities that don't have any other resources. Around here, I've got enough protein on the hoof in the woods to last a lifetime, and it feeds itself so I don't have to worry about that.

A few nights ago, I saw a deer grazing at the base of my white pine tree, no more than 15 feet from the rail of my deck. I don't even have to leave the house - they come to me!

Squirrels all over the place here, I reckon because of all the black walnut, hickory nut, and beech nut trees around. This afternoon, I saw one strolling across my deck like it owned the place, not a care in the world. Yesterday there was a big brown wood rat sitting out there sunning itself like IT owned the deck.

And rabbits. I've got a hutch of wild rabbits living in my yard. Last year, the cat killed two small ones and brought them in as "gifts", but the rabbits payed no mind, and are still living there.

Snakes, lots of snakes. You can see brown water snakes every day down at the bridge, "fishing" for minnows I suppose.

So no, not me nor anyone in my house is going to be eating bugs.

.
Diogenes was eating bread and lentils for supper. He was seen by the philosopher Aristippus, who lived comfortably by flattering the king.

Said Aristippus, ‘If you would learn to be subservient to the king you would not have to live on lentils.’ Said Diogenes, ‘Learn to live on lentils and you will not have to be subservient to the king.’


Reply
#99
(05-30-2022, 12:44 PM)Bally002 Wrote: I agree with @Ninurta here that glass jars with a screw type metal lid are the best for keeping pickled eggs in.  I like to place peppers or as Ninurta mentioned, habaneros and jalapenos are fine for several months storage.

Glass jars can be sterilized in boiling water which is all the better for the long term storage in vinegar.  

Find a jar and try it.  But, make sure the concoction is warm (not hot) when you screw the lid on. (no air if possible).    Then of course place it in a cool location for 6 months. (Date it)  Open and try your eggs.  If done right people will beat a path to your door.  

Let me know in 6 months.

Kind regards,

Bally.

You can still get Mason Jars around here, and the lids and sealing rings for them, so there are still some folks here doing their own canning, probably older folks. The jars can be sterilized and reused, and the rings can, if they don't corrode up, but new lids every batch are a must.I think I've got a couple dozen unused jars out on the porch right now.

.
Diogenes was eating bread and lentils for supper. He was seen by the philosopher Aristippus, who lived comfortably by flattering the king.

Said Aristippus, ‘If you would learn to be subservient to the king you would not have to live on lentils.’ Said Diogenes, ‘Learn to live on lentils and you will not have to be subservient to the king.’


Reply
(05-30-2022, 02:59 PM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote: Sharing video of glassed eggs test after twelve months.

I am a bit afraid of glassed eggs in Florida, it is hot more frequently than not. I live in the woods, and power outages are not rare in the woods, so keeping them cool for a year may be a challenged, and I can't stand the thought of destroying a bucket full of eggs.






A hundred and fifty years ago, they used to use sodium silicate to "glass" eggs for preservation. You can still get the solution under the name "water glass", but it would be cost prohibitive to buy the solution ready made in quantity. It's also used as a glue, and is what they used to glue paper cartridges for black powder revolvers together with.

I'm sure you could make the sodium silicate solution yourself, but have not researched cost and availability of the components. I had never heard of using lime until YouTube happened.

.
Diogenes was eating bread and lentils for supper. He was seen by the philosopher Aristippus, who lived comfortably by flattering the king.

Said Aristippus, ‘If you would learn to be subservient to the king you would not have to live on lentils.’ Said Diogenes, ‘Learn to live on lentils and you will not have to be subservient to the king.’


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