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Green Mosquitoes. I am going mad.
#1
G'day guys,

Big storm passing over presently and tried to post this a while ago.  Was quite warm here.  39C. which is about 102F.  Humid,  Me and 'True Love' got into the splash pool this last afternoon.  Watching the storm approaching.

Caveat :- I have a reaction to insect bites.  Not a bad reaction but I can feel the buggers bite.  I lump up and itch but basically ignore it.  I have "Barmah Forrest Virus" in my system from Mosquitoes.  Hate them, fleas, midgy's, sandflies.

So anyway, the weirdest thing.  We (true love and I) had spent some time in the heat working.  Sweating later in the afternoon we hit our little splash pool to rinse and cool off.  So I had my Cougar Bourbon, some tobacco and commenced to roll a smoke.  I felt a bite on my right upper arm.  I'm rolling a smoke and looked at the blighter, more than once.  It was a mozzie but light green with parts that were transparent.   Instinctively I went 'whack' letting got of the rolly smoke with my left hand.  'Bugger' I thought.  'That was a strange mosquito' went through my mind.  'Nek Minnut' a bite on my upper left arm, same thing, green, nearly translucent mozzie.  I could see this one had picked up a bit of blood.  Smoke in the mouth I slapped it.  The thing crushed up against the skin and turned to a brown - green color.  Bit of a blot.  

I said to 'truey' "look at that."  She said, 'that looks like green tobacco.'   I says, 'Nah, Bullshit, it was a mozzie that bit me.'  And sure enough within a minute the bites lumped up and I was scratching both bite marks.  So we had a conversation about 'green see through mozzies."  And again, on cue,  I got bit again on my chest.  This time I grabbed the bugger and showed the missus between 2 fingers.  It was a mozzie.  A very light green and 'see through' in parts.  Tough bugger too.  Like it had an exoskeleton.  The legs were brittle.  I said to 'truey' , "Get yer camera (Phone).  Sadly by the time she had started exiting the splash pool the thing broke it's legs off and 'be blowed'  flew away.  This was one of those WTF moments. 

So, I thought I'd post this here first on RN3.  I'll be out tomorrow evening.  I have never, ever, seen a mozzie like this and I've been to the four corners of Australia.  To me, it's a new breed and I'm still lumped up and scratching.

Damnit!!!

Kind regards,

Bally:)
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#2
(01-15-2021, 10:47 AM)Bally002 Wrote: ... It was a mozzie but light green with parts that were transparent........  It was a mozzie.  A very light green and 'see through' in parts.  Tough bugger too.  Like it had an exoskeleton.  The legs were brittle....

Bally:)

Mosquitoes of Australia

[Image: main-qimg-865dde2a72bf152fdc57e16975557b4a]

Is a green mosquito dangerous?

You're a gonner mate.
We'll miss you.
G

minusculebeercheers
[Image: attachment.php?aid=8449]
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#3
(01-15-2021, 11:19 AM)gordi Wrote:
(01-15-2021, 10:47 AM)Bally002 Wrote: ... It was a mozzie but light green with parts that were transparent........  It was a mozzie.  A very light green and 'see through' in parts.  Tough bugger too.  Like it had an exoskeleton.  The legs were brittle....

Bally:)

Mosquitoes of Australia

[Image: main-qimg-865dde2a72bf152fdc57e16975557b4a]

Is a green mosquito dangerous?

You're a gonner mate.
We'll miss you.
G

minusculebeercheers

Cheers back at you mate.  Thanks for the well wishes.  Had a read of your links.  Didn't realize there were so many breeds of mozzies.

Pic is interesting.  Is that a Scotch Mosquito.  :)

Kind regards,

Bally:)
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#4
Take this for what it is worth. In survival school they said to always brush a Mosquito away instead of smashing the bugger. Smashing can drive the mouth parts deep into your skin and cause an infection.
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#5
(01-16-2021, 06:05 AM)727Sky Wrote: Take this for what it is worth. In survival school they said to always brush a Mosquito away instead of smashing the bugger. Smashing can drive the mouth parts deep into your skin and cause an infection.

Good advice.  I guess it was an instinct thing.   A couple of those 'Dammit'  moments.  Been bitten by 'Jump Jack' ants many times.  My response is the same.  Tend to strip off when I walk over a nest of those buggers.  Can't brush the buggers off.  The sting from this Jade mozzie was nearly the same.

Crusty Jade mozzies, who'd have thought.

Got me.  All's good.

Cheers for your reply.

Bally:)
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#6
@Bally002 
DAMN!!!  tinywhat
You got Killer Mosquito's There Too along with everything else that is trying to kill you!!!!!!  tinysurprised
Once A Rogue, Always A Rogue!
[Image: attachment.php?aid=936]
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#7
I found this interesting.


Quote:
Green Mosquitoes Could Control Killer Disease

Brandon Keim


[Image: mosquitobiting.jpg]

By adding life-shortening bacteria to disease-carrying mosquitoes, Australian researchers might have found a clever way to control Dengue fever, a developing world scourge now becoming common in the southern United States.

Thus infected, mosquitoes live long enough to reproduce, ensuring contagion within their own population — but their lives are too short for the Dengue-causing virus inside them to become fully mature and deadly to humans.

"We're not trying to eliminate the population, but to let a bacterial symbiont in, and then shift the population," said University of Queensland bacterial geneticist Scott O'Neill. "There will still be mosquitoes around, but only young ones. It's a biological control."

Dengue fever infects between 50 and 100 million people worldwide, causing severe flu-like symptoms and — in especially severe cases — a hemorrhagic fever that kills more than 20,000 people each year. Though treatable, the disease cannot be prevented — but not for lack of trying.
Many Dengue control plans, from pesticides to sterilized mosquitoes, have worked in a laboratory but fallen short in reality. Nevertheless, O'Neill's bacterial hack has drawn praise from grizzled Dengue control experts, and its promise comes at an opportune time.

Disease burden is greatest in the developing world, but climate change has driven Dengue's tropical mosquito vectors into previously-inhospitable regions, and incidence is rising in the southern United States and Puerto Rico.

"This isn't just a problem in Central America and Africa and Southeast Asia. It's a growing problem as well in the United States," said Joe Cummins, a University of Western Ontario geneticist who called O'Neill's technique "simple and elegant."

Years ago, O'Neill and his colleagues noticed that Wolbachia, a common bacterial parasite in insects, shortened the lives of fruit flies. If it did the same in Dengue-carrying mosquitoes, they reasoned, it would kill them before virus reached maturity. Dengue only affects humans during the last stages of its life cycle.

But repeated efforts to infect mosquitoes with Wolbachia failed until, as described in a paper published Thursday in Science, his team cultured the bacteria in dishes of mosquito cells for three years. The microbes adapted to their new host species' cellular environment.

O'Neill's Wolbachia strain now has a taste for mosquitoes. Once infected, the insects live for about a month — just half their normal lifespan, but long enough to reproduce.
Through a quirk of mosquito physiology, if an uninfected female mates with a Wolbachia-carrying male, she goes sterile. Meanwhile, infected females produce infected offspring, regardless of the male's disease status.

The mathematical inexorability of this phenomenon will make it difficult for mosquitoes to develop resistance, hopes O'Neill, and will guarantee Wolbachia's Dengue-crippling spread through entire mosquito populations. All he has to do is inject Wolbachia into a few starter bugs, breed them, and send them into the world.

"It'll spread the trait out there 100 percent, despite the fitness cost," he said. "We're in the sweet spot. All individuals will get the parasite. That's the key to this whole strategy."
The Dengue virus itself could also evolve into a more rapidly-maturing form, but O'Neill thinks this unlikely. Only a few mosquitoes now live long enough for Dengue to reach full virulence: selection already favors accelerated development.

"I think we're being close to up against some genetic constraint, where Dengue virus is going through mosquitoes as fast as it possibly can," said O'Neill.
Duane Gubler, director of the Asia-Pacific Institute of Tropical Medicine and Infectious Diseases, said the early results "look very promising." However, he cautioned that many earlier Dengue control approaches "worked beautifully in the laboratory, but failed miserably when taken to the field. The real test is if they can show that this works in field populations."

wired.com
[Image: attachment.php?aid=8192]




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#8
This is why I love Kentucky. I grew up in South Carolina, and those skeeters would swarm you. I do not miss that.
The Truth is Out There, Somewhere
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#9
(01-17-2021, 01:21 AM)guohua Wrote: @Bally002 
DAMN!!!  tinywhat
You got Killer Mosquito's There Too along with everything else that is trying to kill you!!!!!!  tinysurprised

Yeah...Nah....methinks...having never seen these tiny green bugs before, with the ability to break away and fly off, coupled with their armored resilience and the oily mixture left over.  These are flamin drone bugs sent to infect us.  Crikey!!!,...I'm in the realm of conspiracy.  The itch is metallic.   

Sigh and another sigh.  This is what RN does to me.  (Insert cheeky grin)

Kind regards and best wishes Bally :)
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#10
(01-17-2021, 02:24 AM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote: I found this interesting.


Quote:
Green Mosquitoes Could Control Killer Disease

Brandon Keim


[Image: mosquitobiting.jpg]

By adding life-shortening bacteria to disease-carrying mosquitoes, Australian researchers might have found a clever way to control Dengue fever, a developing world scourge now becoming common in the southern United States.

Thus infected, mosquitoes live long enough to reproduce, ensuring contagion within their own population — but their lives are too short for the Dengue-causing virus inside them to become fully mature and deadly to humans.

"We're not trying to eliminate the population, but to let a bacterial symbiont in, and then shift the population," said University of Queensland bacterial geneticist Scott O'Neill. "There will still be mosquitoes around, but only young ones. It's a biological control."

Dengue fever infects between 50 and 100 million people worldwide, causing severe flu-like symptoms and — in especially severe cases — a hemorrhagic fever that kills more than 20,000 people each year. Though treatable, the disease cannot be prevented — but not for lack of trying.
Many Dengue control plans, from pesticides to sterilized mosquitoes, have worked in a laboratory but fallen short in reality. Nevertheless, O'Neill's bacterial hack has drawn praise from grizzled Dengue control experts, and its promise comes at an opportune time.

Disease burden is greatest in the developing world, but climate change has driven Dengue's tropical mosquito vectors into previously-inhospitable regions, and incidence is rising in the southern United States and Puerto Rico.

"This isn't just a problem in Central America and Africa and Southeast Asia. It's a growing problem as well in the United States," said Joe Cummins, a University of Western Ontario geneticist who called O'Neill's technique "simple and elegant."

Years ago, O'Neill and his colleagues noticed that Wolbachia, a common bacterial parasite in insects, shortened the lives of fruit flies. If it did the same in Dengue-carrying mosquitoes, they reasoned, it would kill them before virus reached maturity. Dengue only affects humans during the last stages of its life cycle.

But repeated efforts to infect mosquitoes with Wolbachia failed until, as described in a paper published Thursday in Science, his team cultured the bacteria in dishes of mosquito cells for three years. The microbes adapted to their new host species' cellular environment.

O'Neill's Wolbachia strain now has a taste for mosquitoes. Once infected, the insects live for about a month — just half their normal lifespan, but long enough to reproduce.
Through a quirk of mosquito physiology, if an uninfected female mates with a Wolbachia-carrying male, she goes sterile. Meanwhile, infected females produce infected offspring, regardless of the male's disease status.

The mathematical inexorability of this phenomenon will make it difficult for mosquitoes to develop resistance, hopes O'Neill, and will guarantee Wolbachia's Dengue-crippling spread through entire mosquito populations. All he has to do is inject Wolbachia into a few starter bugs, breed them, and send them into the world.

"It'll spread the trait out there 100 percent, despite the fitness cost," he said. "We're in the sweet spot. All individuals will get the parasite. That's the key to this whole strategy."
The Dengue virus itself could also evolve into a more rapidly-maturing form, but O'Neill thinks this unlikely. Only a few mosquitoes now live long enough for Dengue to reach full virulence: selection already favors accelerated development.

"I think we're being close to up against some genetic constraint, where Dengue virus is going through mosquitoes as fast as it possibly can," said O'Neill.
Duane Gubler, director of the Asia-Pacific Institute of Tropical Medicine and Infectious Diseases, said the early results "look very promising." However, he cautioned that many earlier Dengue control approaches "worked beautifully in the laboratory, but failed miserably when taken to the field. The real test is if they can show that this works in field populations."

wired.com

I have been infected with "Barmah Forest' Virus. (Blood tests confirmed) Source is mosquitoes.  Not a pleasant thing.  Rather have Covid.  This virus may rise on occasions and hit me at any time.  Read up on it.  It's flu plus.  Learnt to work through it.  When the Doc told me,, it was a "WTF is that Sh1t? "   Funny thing was the Doc asked me if I want a psychologist to help me through the symptoms which in my case resembled depression.  Looking at the Doc with tilted head and twitching eye I said, "Whatcha talking about Doc?  I don't do that type of sh1t."  It was my demeanor.  Very flat but turned out to be symptomatic for me with the virus.

So I react to mosquitoes.  But in saying that.  These buggers were different.  Only side effects was a sting and intense itch but that's pretty normal for me however the sensations were pretty well immediate which is unusual.  That and the fact they blighters were green was different for me.

Appreciate your reply.  Bit more education for me.

Kind regards,

bally:)
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#11
(01-17-2021, 02:59 AM)kdog Wrote: This is why I love Kentucky. I grew up in South Carolina, and those skeeters would swarm you. I do not miss that.

Pretty much the same in the 'Top End'  Which is 'Northern Territory'.  Spent may years up there but when fishing for endless Barramundi and catching giant mud crabs you sometimes neglect the skin and forget the bites.

Tip toeing around Crocs was more intense.

Cheers for your words,

Bally:)
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#12
(01-17-2021, 01:30 PM)Bally002 Wrote: I have been infected with "Barmah Forest' Virus. (Blood tests confirmed) Source is mosquitoes.  Not a pleasant thing.  Rather have Covid.  This virus may rise on occasions and hit me at any time.  Read up on it.  It's flu plus.  Learnt to work through it.  When the Doc told me,, it was a "WTF is that Sh1t? "   Funny thing was the Doc asked me if I want a psychologist to help me through the symptoms which in my case resembled depression.  Looking at the Doc with tilted head and twitching eye I said, "Whatcha talking about Doc?  I don't do that type of sh1t."  It was my demeanor.  Very flat but turned out to be symptomatic for me with the virus.

So I react to mosquitoes.  But in saying that.  These buggers were different.  Only side effects was a sting and intense itch but that's pretty normal for me however the sensations were pretty well immediate which is unusual.  That and the fact they blighters were green was different for me.

Appreciate your reply.  Bit more education for me.

Kind regards,

bally:)

Quote:
Local officials in Florida have approved the release of 750 million mosquitoes that have been genetically modified to reduce local populations.

The aim is to reduce the number of mosquitoes that carry diseases like dengue or the Zika virus.
The green-lighting of a pilot project after years of debate drew a swift outcry from environmental groups, who warned of unintended consequences.

One group condemned the plan as a public "Jurassic Park experiment".
Activists warn of possible damage to ecosystems, and the potential creation of hybrid, insecticide-resistant mosquitoes.

But the company involved says there will be no adverse risk to humans or the environment, and points to a slate of government-backed studies.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-53856776

Our government dollars at work. Another opportunity to use us as guinea pigs.

We got some of those guys dumped on us, and they too seem to crumble rather than splatter like the regular ones do.

To be honest I am very suspicious of the little buggers. But I am suspicious of anything that my government has its hands into.
[Image: attachment.php?aid=8192]




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