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Mosquitoes Are Not So Dumb
#1
Brick 
I have heard people say, "He is as dumb as a mosquito." Well it turns out mosquitoes are not as dumb as we think they are. Considering what they are able to accomplish with their tiny brains, I would say they are quite intelligent. Since they have the ability to learn from their experiences shows they are smarter than some of us.  tinylaughing

Quote:By Jason Bittel
August 5, 2019 at 5:32 p.m. EDT

Whether you’re playing soccer at the park, hiking in the woods or taking a walk along the beach, everyone knows the tiny buzz next to your ear means that a mosquito is probably near. But have you ever wondered how an insect no bigger than a pea is able to track you down?

Mosquitoes don’t just use one sense to look for dinner. They have evolved a sort of Swiss Army knife of tools that tells them when fresh blood is close by.
“The first thing is that they smell us,” said Clément Vinauger, a scientist who studies mosquitoes at Virginia Tech.

When humans and other animals breathe, they exhale a gas called carbon dioxide, and mosquitoes have sensors that can detect this scent, like a pie cooling on a windowsill.

Mosquitoes also have eyes that can see shades of black and white, as well as movement. Still more sensors allow the insects to zero in on heat.

“The thing is, we didn’t know how they combined all of this information in their brain so that it made sense to them,” Vinauger told KidsPost.

That is, until Vinauger and his team started performing experiments on live mosquitoes.
With a setup that is part virtual reality and part flight simulator, the scientists let mosquitoes fly inside a chamber that offered them different sights and smells and then recorded how they reacted. They also created tiny plastic mosquito helmets that provided images of the insect’s brains, giving insight into how they think.

The result? Vinauger said that when a mosquito gets a whiff of carbon dioxide, the smelling part of its brain begins to send messages to the visual part telling it to be on the lookout for food.

On the other hand, if the mosquito doesn’t first smell something yummy, it doesn’t waste time looking for a meal. The two senses go hand in hand, in other words.

Amazingly, mosquitoes can learn from their experiences.

In another study, Vinauger found that mosquitoes can smell the difference between someone who is sleeping and someone who is awake and trying to swat them. And when he offered a choice between the two smells 24 hours later, the bloodsuckers were smart enough to choose the easier, sleeping target.

Now most people are probably not going to read this and fall in love with mosquitoes. But at the very least, perhaps we should give this insect a little more respect than we do.
After all, when mosquitoes bite us, it’s nothing personal. Mosquitoes require protein so they can create eggs, which is why only the females drink blood. (Males eat plant sap and nectar.) And every time that momma mosquito goes on the hunt, she risks her life for the sake of the next generation.
Think about that the next time you feel the urge to swat.
Now these are some smart guys. Making the helmets is one amazing feat. Putting them on the mosquitoes is quite impressive. 

[Image: AZEAQ7-PIN5-CBBMB66-BZILTDEFQ.jpg]

Quote:Researchers used an insect flight simulator (pictured here) along with CRISPR gene editing and RNAi techniques to determine that dopamine is a key mediator of aversive learning in mosquitoes. Courtesy Kiley Riffell (Courtesy Kiley Riffell)
[Image: attachment.php?aid=8192]




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#2
I've noticed they choose clever hiding places after coming under attack.

I think a lot more creatures in this world are more intelligent that we believe.

Cheers
[Image: 14sigsepia.jpg]

Location: The lost world, Elsewhen
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#3
Cool thread! Nice distraction from all the... all...

I don't need this info, but i surely did not at all need the info i had in my mind before this!

Wife: Hello dear, how was your day at work?

Husband: I made tiny plastic mosquito helmets.

Wife: Those brownies in the fridge were meant for our special weekend and you seemingly stole them!

Husband: ???
[Image: attachment.php?aid=8023]
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#4
(10-14-2020, 12:55 PM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote: I have heard people say, "He is as dumb as a mosquito." Well it turns out mosquitoes are not as dumb as we think they are. Considering what they are able to accomplish with their tiny brains, I would say they are quite intelligent. Since they have the ability to learn from their experiences shows they are smarter than some of us.  tinylaughing

Quote:By Jason Bittel
August 5, 2019 at 5:32 p.m. EDT

Whether you’re playing soccer at the park, hiking in the woods or taking a walk along the beach, everyone knows the tiny buzz next to your ear means that a mosquito is probably near. But have you ever wondered how an insect no bigger than a pea is able to track you down?

Mosquitoes don’t just use one sense to look for dinner. They have evolved a sort of Swiss Army knife of tools that tells them when fresh blood is close by.
“The first thing is that they smell us,” said Clément Vinauger, a scientist who studies mosquitoes at Virginia Tech.

When humans and other animals breathe, they exhale a gas called carbon dioxide, and mosquitoes have sensors that can detect this scent, like a pie cooling on a windowsill.

Mosquitoes also have eyes that can see shades of black and white, as well as movement. Still more sensors allow the insects to zero in on heat.

“The thing is, we didn’t know how they combined all of this information in their brain so that it made sense to them,” Vinauger told KidsPost.

That is, until Vinauger and his team started performing experiments on live mosquitoes.
With a setup that is part virtual reality and part flight simulator, the scientists let mosquitoes fly inside a chamber that offered them different sights and smells and then recorded how they reacted. They also created tiny plastic mosquito helmets that provided images of the insect’s brains, giving insight into how they think.

The result? Vinauger said that when a mosquito gets a whiff of carbon dioxide, the smelling part of its brain begins to send messages to the visual part telling it to be on the lookout for food.

On the other hand, if the mosquito doesn’t first smell something yummy, it doesn’t waste time looking for a meal. The two senses go hand in hand, in other words.

Amazingly, mosquitoes can learn from their experiences.

In another study, Vinauger found that mosquitoes can smell the difference between someone who is sleeping and someone who is awake and trying to swat them. And when he offered a choice between the two smells 24 hours later, the bloodsuckers were smart enough to choose the easier, sleeping target.

Now most people are probably not going to read this and fall in love with mosquitoes. But at the very least, perhaps we should give this insect a little more respect than we do.
After all, when mosquitoes bite us, it’s nothing personal. Mosquitoes require protein so they can create eggs, which is why only the females drink blood. (Males eat plant sap and nectar.) And every time that momma mosquito goes on the hunt, she risks her life for the sake of the next generation.
Think about that the next time you feel the urge to swat.
Now these are some smart guys. Making the helmets is one amazing feat. Putting them on the mosquitoes is quite impressive. 

[Image: AZEAQ7-PIN5-CBBMB66-BZILTDEFQ.jpg]

Quote:Researchers used an insect flight simulator (pictured here) along with CRISPR gene editing and RNAi techniques to determine that dopamine is a key mediator of aversive learning in mosquitoes. Courtesy Kiley Riffell (Courtesy Kiley Riffell)
If mosquitoes have a form of intelligent then perhaps the same rule applies to them as applies when any intelligent life form is observed.
Behavior is changed when an intelligent life form is observed.
WAR IS PEACE, FREEDOM IS SLAVERY, IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH, THE EU IS FATHER AND MOTHER / FEAR NOT DEATH, BUT FEAR THE WAY YOU WILL DIE
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#5
(10-14-2020, 01:30 PM)F2d5thCav Wrote: I've noticed they choose clever hiding places after coming under attack.

I think a lot more creatures in this world are more intelligent that we believe.

Cheers

Yeah, but the,  
Quote:....... CRISPR gene editing and RNAi techniques to determine that dopamine is a key mediator of aversive learning in mosquitoes. 
brings to mind a thousand plus plots for sci-fi movies. 

I will admit CRISPR concerns me, and in the wrong hands terrifies me. 

What other animals are they messing with, and teaching? Planet of the Apes may not as far fetched as we once thought.
[Image: attachment.php?aid=8192]




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#6
@NightskyeB4Dawn 

Planet of the Chimps would be a more apt description IMO. tinysure

Cheers
[Image: 14sigsepia.jpg]

Location: The lost world, Elsewhen
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#7
(10-14-2020, 06:49 PM)F2d5thCav Wrote: @NightskyeB4Dawn 

Planet of the Chimps would be a more apt description IMO. tinysure

Cheers

Tomatoe, tomato.   tinylaughing
[Image: attachment.php?aid=8192]




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