Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Hundreds of thousands of migratory birds have been found dead in New Mexico
#1
First I saw about the orca today, now this about the birds!


[Image: 200914161925-01-new-mexico-birds-died-mi...ge-169.jpg]



Quote:Biologists at New Mexico State University are trying to find out why hundreds of thousands of migratory birds have been found dead across the state.

The mystery started August 20 with the discovery of a large number of dead birds at the US Army White Sands Missile Range and White Sands National Monument, according to Martha Desmond, a professor at the university's department of fish, wildlife and conservation ecology.
What was first believed to be an isolated incident turned out to be a much more serious problem when hundreds more dead birds were found in regions across the state. including Doña Ana County, Jemez Pueblo, Roswell and Socorro.

The count is up in the six figure range now. They think it may be because of the west coast fires and smoke causing them to alter their migratory paths but even that still leaves many questions.


LINK

Really hoping that it is because of the fires, but with all going on in the world now who really knows for sure?
I'm reminded of the bird deaths in Beebe, Arkansas and other places several years ago.
"As an American it's your responsibility to have your own strategic duck stockpile. You can't expect the government to do it for you." - the dork I call one of my mom's other kids
Reply
#2
(09-15-2020, 04:21 AM)GeauxHomeLittleD Wrote: First I saw about the orca today, now this about the birds!


[Image: 200914161925-01-new-mexico-birds-died-mi...ge-169.jpg]



Quote:Biologists at New Mexico State University are trying to find out why hundreds of thousands of migratory birds have been found dead across the state.

The mystery started August 20 with the discovery of a large number of dead birds at the US Army White Sands Missile Range and White Sands National Monument, according to Martha Desmond, a professor at the university's department of fish, wildlife and conservation ecology.
What was first believed to be an isolated incident turned out to be a much more serious problem when hundreds more dead birds were found in regions across the state. including Doña Ana County, Jemez Pueblo, Roswell and Socorro.

The count is up in the six figure range now. They think it may be because of the west coast fires and smoke causing them to alter their migratory paths but even that still leaves many questions.


LINK

Really hoping that it is because of the fires, but with all going on in the world now who really knows for sure?
I'm reminded of the bird deaths in Beebe, Arkansas and other places several years ago.

Burds arw all lungs. Think, canary in a xial mind. It stands to reason considering the air quality. The chain is broken.
internet Agent Provocateur
Reply
#3
(09-15-2020, 04:21 AM)GeauxHomeLittleD Wrote: First I saw about the orca today, now this about the birds!


[Image: 200914161925-01-new-mexico-birds-died-mi...ge-169.jpg]



Quote:Biologists at New Mexico State University are trying to find out why hundreds of thousands of migratory birds have been found dead across the state.

The mystery started August 20 with the discovery of a large number of dead birds at the US Army White Sands Missile Range and White Sands National Monument, according to Martha Desmond, a professor at the university's department of fish, wildlife and conservation ecology.
What was first believed to be an isolated incident turned out to be a much more serious problem when hundreds more dead birds were found in regions across the state. including Doña Ana County, Jemez Pueblo, Roswell and Socorro.

The count is up in the six figure range now. They think it may be because of the west coast fires and smoke causing them to alter their migratory paths but even that still leaves many questions.


LINK

Really hoping that it is because of the fires, but with all going on in the world now who really knows for sure?
I'm reminded of the bird deaths in Beebe, Arkansas and other places several years ago.

Birds are all lungs. Think canary in a coal mine.
It stands to reason considering the air quality. The chain is broken.
Without birds the bugs run rampant and the crops get destroyed by pestilence and famine ensues and ....ugh!
internet Agent Provocateur
Reply
#4
@Antisthenes 

We need the bugs though. They are an extremely important link in the food chain. 
I'm concerned about the genetically modified mosquitoes and the insect loss they may cause. Many animals depend on mosquitoes as a large part of their diets. Bats, birds, frogs, fish...
"As an American it's your responsibility to have your own strategic duck stockpile. You can't expect the government to do it for you." - the dork I call one of my mom's other kids
Reply
#5
Swear to God , as my wife typed this thread and asks me about it, I go search, and something is weird. 

https://www.swpc.noaa.gov/products/goes-magnetometer

Don't know how to screen shot, but I sent it to my love to post. Something weird happen with the magnetosphere .
The Truth is Out There, Somewhere
Reply
#6
Something @kdog found that might also be a contributing factor.


[Image: GOES-Magnetometer-NOAA-NWS-Space-Weather...aa-gov.png]


The magnetosphere has been doing some sketchy stuff lately which might also be affecting migratory patterns.

LINK 
"As an American it's your responsibility to have your own strategic duck stockpile. You can't expect the government to do it for you." - the dork I call one of my mom's other kids
Reply
#7
(09-15-2020, 04:28 AM)Antisthenes Wrote:
(09-15-2020, 04:21 AM)GeauxHomeLittleD Wrote: First I saw about the orca today, now this about the birds!


[Image: 200914161925-01-new-mexico-birds-died-mi...ge-169.jpg]



Quote:Biologists at New Mexico State University are trying to find out why hundreds of thousands of migratory birds have been found dead across the state.

The mystery started August 20 with the discovery of a large number of dead birds at the US Army White Sands Missile Range and White Sands National Monument, according to Martha Desmond, a professor at the university's department of fish, wildlife and conservation ecology.
What was first believed to be an isolated incident turned out to be a much more serious problem when hundreds more dead birds were found in regions across the state. including Doña Ana County, Jemez Pueblo, Roswell and Socorro.

The count is up in the six figure range now. They think it may be because of the west coast fires and smoke causing them to alter their migratory paths but even that still leaves many questions.


LINK

Really hoping that it is because of the fires, but with all going on in the world now who really knows for sure?
I'm reminded of the bird deaths in Beebe, Arkansas and other places several years ago.

Burds are all lungs. Think canary in a coal mind.
     It stands to reason considering the air quality. The chain is broken.
     Without birds the bugs run rampant and the crops get destroyed by pestilence and famine ensues and ....ugh!

They also rely on the Earth's magnetosphere for navigation.
The Truth is Out There, Somewhere
Reply
#8
2020 bingo, who had the poles flip in September?
The Truth is Out There, Somewhere
Reply
#9
(09-15-2020, 04:37 AM)GeauxHomeLittleD Wrote: @Antisthenes 

We need the bugs though. They are an extremely important link in the food chain. 
I'm concerned about the genetically modified mosquitoes and the insect loss they may cause. Many animals depend on mosquitoes as a large part of their diets. Bats, birds, frogs, fish...



I agree totally But if too many birds die then ecobalance is disrupted and without the bugs natural predators being present, their population goes unchecked and crops get destroyed. )-:
internet Agent Provocateur
Reply
#10
The dove's flight behavior was quite wonky this year.  I talked to another guy on the sidewalk just yesterday ... and he had observed the same.

And ... remember how bad the skeeters were all year long?  I'm seeing (and getting bit) by some kind of bug that looks like a skeeter, but has black wings.
'Cause if they catch you in the backseat tryin'ta pick her locks
They're gonna send you home to momma in a cardboard box
You better run!!
Reply
#11
(09-15-2020, 04:32 PM)Snarl Wrote: The dove's flight behavior was quite wonky this year.  I talked to another guy on the sidewalk just yesterday ... and he had observed the same.

And ... remember how bad the skeeters were all year long?  I'm seeing (and getting bit) by some kind of bug that looks like a skeeter, but has black wings.

I have been seeing reports of highly unusual animal and insect behavior all over the world recently. Whether this is being caused by magnetosphere anomalies, 5G, experiments they are doing with the large Hadron collider or something that we haven't even considered yet remains to be seen.
"As an American it's your responsibility to have your own strategic duck stockpile. You can't expect the government to do it for you." - the dork I call one of my mom's other kids
Reply
#12
It’s so awful, those poor little birds! These wildfires have all kinds of devastating consequences, affecting all kinds of species. I bet it’s affecting honeybees also. So much of the U.S. is now blanketed in the smoke from the wildfires. 

In Wisconsin, we had hazy skies and an orange/red sunset. The weather radar showed some of the wildfire smoke coming into the state. Our air quality is still pretty good though, much better than a lot of states. I feel awful for everyone in harm’s way for these fires.
[Image: attachment.php?aid=8180]
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)