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Winter potatoes
#1
Howdy all you green thumbs!
  I would like to try a Fall crop of potatoes this year. I think I will have a much better chance during our super mild winter than battling the intense heat and insects we deal with (Tx)
   So.. I've never done these and would love any advice you guys might have.  Is it too late for me to get a bag of organic potatoes and let them sit until mid or end of September and then plant?  I just don't know how long they need to 'rest' or do I even need to do that? Can I go ahead and plant them straightaway once we get under 100°+? 
 I've heard russets don't do very well here but yukons and reds seem to be a pretty good bet so I'm gonna try those I guess. 
Any advice/comments appreciated!
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#2
(08-31-2020, 04:52 PM)Starcrossd Wrote: Howdy all you green thumbs!
  I would like to try a Fall crop of potatoes this year. I think I will have a much better chance during our super mild winter than battling the intense heat and insects we deal with (Tx)
   So.. I've never done these and would love any advice you guys might have.  Is it too late for me to get a bag of organic potatoes and let them sit until mid or end of September and then plant?  I just don't know how long they need to 'rest' or do I even need to do that? Can I go ahead and plant them straightaway once we get under 100°+? 
 I've heard russets don't do very well here but yukons and reds seem to be a pretty good bet so I'm gonna try those I guess. 
Any advice/comments appreciated!
Not sure if I’m much help as this is the first year I’m trying fall potatoes. We had some left over from our spring planting that had already begun to sprout. I planted mostly reds. 

We also bought organic ones, cut them and planted them to see what may happen with them. We made some wire cages and put straw and a little dirt in there and layered them. We had good luck doing it this way during our spring planting. Our ground here is too rocky and hard so this worked a lot better.

Good luck with your potatoes.
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#3
(08-31-2020, 06:28 PM)VioletDove Wrote:
(08-31-2020, 04:52 PM)Starcrossd Wrote: Howdy all you green thumbs!
  I would like to try a Fall crop of potatoes this year. I think I will have a much better chance during our super mild winter than battling the intense heat and insects we deal with (Tx)
   So.. I've never done these and would love any advice you guys might have.  Is it too late for me to get a bag of organic potatoes and let them sit until mid or end of September and then plant?  I just don't know how long they need to 'rest' or do I even need to do that? Can I go ahead and plant them straightaway once we get under 100°+? 
 I've heard russets don't do very well here but yukons and reds seem to be a pretty good bet so I'm gonna try those I guess. 
Any advice/comments appreciated!
Not sure if I’m much help as this is the first year I’m trying fall potatoes. We had some left over from our spring planting that had already begun to sprout. I planted mostly reds. 

We also bought organic ones, cut them and planted them to see what may happen with them. We made some wire cages and put straw and a little dirt in there and layered them. We had good luck doing it this way during our spring planting. Our ground here is too rocky and hard so this worked a lot better.

Good luck with your potatoes.

I have grown potatoes in the garden for twenty five years.  I usually plant them in the spring, because potatoes get expensive in July and august or they are laden with antisprouting chemicals.  I usually reach into the hill and grab some fresh off the plant, then in late September, the rest are harvested.  If I didn't rob the plants I would get a couple of bushels in the fall, but I wind up with emergency seed potatoes for the next year and also about twenty pounds of smaller spuds in the fall.  New potatoes in summer is what I look for.  I but a couple of bushels in the fall and again in January and stock them in the basement usually.  I always have at least twenty five pounds of potatoes in stock, it is a staple in our diet.  You just have to rotate the potatoes and keep them in a cool place.  New crops are hitting the store, but they do not store long, the skin is flaky instead of set.  Another month and the skins will be set.

Around here, potatoes go cheap, we just bought six five pound bags for a buck forty nine a bag...new crop.  The deer begging at the patio door eat way more than we do, two third of the potatoes we buy go to the deer in the fall and summer.
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#4
Quote:two third of the potatoes we buy go to the deer in the fall and summer.

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Blessed are those who well receive the ambassadors of the natural world.

Cheers
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Location: The lost world, Elsewhen
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#5
All I can tell you is that I remember my parents planting potatoes in the fall. Don't know the details of what they did, so... I googled it.

https://www.homestead-acres.com/planting...-the-fall/
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#6
@Starcrossd 

I really don't know the answer to your question, Sorry.
BUT, I would like to say Hi!!!  :minusculehi:
Damn Nice To Meet YOU!
I do hope you are enjoying our little home here.  tinybigeyes
Once A Rogue, Always A Rogue!
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#7
Smile 
Thank you all for the great info!!  I didn't have much luck googling, so thanks so much for the link also!  I will employ all of the tips and tricks!
 Congrats everyone on the bounty and bless you for sharing with the animals. I love that. 
 Hello guohua!! Thank you for the warm welcome! Nice to meet you as well. I know most of the peeps here from ATS but I am pretty much brand new here. Thanks again everyone!
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#8
@Starcrossd 
You can ask @BIAD  for a Costume AVATAR, just PM him.
BIAD does have a Tool Shed or Shack where That Gorgeous Creature in a Red Dress does this for free.  minusculethumbsup2
Once A Rogue, Always A Rogue!
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