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We're fake news
#61
(07-03-2020, 02:59 AM)veteranhumanbeing Wrote: News cycle too fast...bung bag of the 24 hr. dive bar/blossom shop open all night variety. 
Monday-Any Seattle elected official
Tuesday- Over educated Statue trashing chicken breasted white men
Wednesday-The Chinese Communist Party for inflicting Covid19 upon the world 
Thursday-The Chinese Communist Party for creating a new gestapo surveillance force in Hong Kong
Friday-(its a tie) Bill DeBlasio's Paintbrush vs Nancy Pelosi's Dentures

And the outcome of such a manner of reporting supposedly factual news...?
These are just in the US and sourced from here.



Quote:'This article was originally published on April 6, 2020, and has been frequently updated since.
It was last updated on June 30. We’ve also cut dates and other details, which you can find in
the related links.

It’s getting hard to keep track of the bad news about the news right now. But we have to.
Here’s our attempt to collect the layoffs, furloughs, and closures caused by the coronavirus’ critical
blow to the economy and journalism in the United States. Please send tips. We’ll try to keep up.

In most cases, these entries link to previously reported stories. In some cases, where there are no
links, we’re using relying on tips to help show the full impact of this pandemic.

One more note: We haven’t figured out a way to track the loss of work for freelancers, but please read
more about how the pandemic has hurt their livelihoods here...'

It wasn't the flu that caused the MSM to fail, it was the major networks and their own brand of fake news.
But like most things in life, it's the little guy who get hurt first.
tinysure

Newspapers, weeklies and alt-weeklies
The Stranger in Seattle temporarily suspended print and laid off 18 staffers.
“The Stranger has never had to do mass layoffs before, nor have we ever not put out our print edition,
with the exception of the one week we skipped in 2017 when we reconceptualised the print edition as
a biweekly.” (Also, read Joshua Benton’s collection of alt news in Nieman Lab. It’s extensive.)

The Portland (Oregon) Mercury announced it was temporarily cutting print and had temporarily laid off 10 staffers.
DigBoston suspended print publication. It resumed them in June.
Sacramento (California) News & Review, Chico (California) News & Review and Reno (Nevada) News & Review
suspended print and laid off staff.
Salaries were cut at the Phoenix New Times, Denver’s Westword, Dallas Observer, Houston Press and Miami
New Times.

The Tampa Bay Times, which Poynter owns, laid off 11 journalists, noting the cuts were expected since February.
On March 30, the Times reported it was eliminating five days of print and furloughing some non-newsroom staff.
Monterey County Weekly in California announced it had laid off seven employees.
Three other staffers had salaries reduced, the CEO eliminated his salary and the publisher took a pay cut.
Texas’ San Antonio Current laid off 10 employees.
Riverfront Times in St. Louis laid off seven.

Shepherd Express in Milwaukee suspended its print edition.
The Pulse in Chattanooga, Tennessee, suspended publication.
CityBeat in Cincinnati, Ohio, had furloughs and pay cuts.
MetroTimes in Detroit laid off eight staffers. 
Creative Loafing in Tampa laid off seven employees.

Cleveland Scene in Ohio laid off five staffers.
Orlando Weekly laid off 13 people. 
And Oklahoma Gazette in Oklahoma City paused print publication.
Isthmus, a weekly in Madison, Wisconsin, announced it had to “go dark for an undetermined amount of time.”
The Fauquier Times in Warrenton, Virginia announced layoffs, reduced hours and furloughs.

And the Mountain View Voice in Mountain View, California suspended print temporarily.
Austin Chronicle in Texas went to an every-other-week print schedule.
Mountain Xpress in Asheville, North Carolina, laid off seven and had pay cuts.
The Rutland Herald and Barre-Montpelier Times Argus in Vermont laid off 20 employees and temporarily cut print
down from five days to three.

The Durango (Colorado) Herald laid off five people from its news and advertising departments.
Trib Total Media in Pennsylvania combined two print editions and laid off staff.
Providence Business Journal suspended its print edition.
In Vermont, Seven Days laid off seven employees.
The Times-Picayune/nola.com/The Advocate in New Orleans announced a temporary furlough of 10% of its
workforce.

Valley News, which covers the Upper Valley region in Vermont and New Hampshire, announced layoffs, a cut
in hours and pay.
Three Vermont weeklies, the Milton Independent, Essex Reporter and Colchester Sun, had temporarily cut print.
The Warwick Beacon in Rhode Island cut one publication day to become a weekly and had eight layoffs, including
the publisher.

Northampton, Massachusetts’ Daily Hampshire Gazette had layoffs, the suspension of Hampshire Life and the
last print edition of the Valley Advocate until the end of April.
The 13-year-old Waterbury (Vermont) Record reported it printed its last edition.
RI Suburban Newspapers laid off employees, reduced the hours of others and cut publication days for the
Narragansett Times.

Easy Reader News in Hermosa Beach, California laid off its entire staff, “returns to volunteer roots.”
Sound Publishing “which owns 43 titles across the state including the Everett Daily Herald and the Peninsula Daily
News,” had layoffs and furloughs.
Hours were cut for “Tennessee-based Adams Publishing Group, which owns nine Washington papers, including dailies
The Skagit Valley Herald and The Ellensburg Daily Record,” Khashimova Long reported.
Inlander in Spokane, Washington has layoffs.

Gannett had furloughs and other cost-cutting measures, including 25% pay reductions for executives.
In June, Gannett announced that reporters and visual journalists at its local papers and USA Today would be exempt from
furloughs.

The Times Leader in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, announced it’s cutting print on Saturday, Monday and Tuesday.
The Henrico Citizen in Henrico County, Virginia, announced it was stopping its twice-monthly print edition for April “and
possibly beyond.”
The Daily Herald in Illinois cut pay.

And the Palo Alto Daily Post in California switched to a four-day-a-week printing schedule.
Lee Enterprises had furloughs and cost-cutting measures, including a 20% pay cut for executives.
The Capital Times in Madison, Wisconsin, announced furloughs and pay cuts.
East Oregonian reported its parent company laid off 47.

The San Francisco Examiner and SF Weekly announced cuts in hours and pay to staff.
Honolulu Civil Beat reported the Honolulu Star-Advertiser furloughed and cut hours for some staff.
The Star-Advertiser also cut its Saturday print edition. 
22nd Century Media, which published community newspapers in the Chicago suburbs, went out of business.
Atlanta Magazine laid off six staffers.
Left Hand Valley Courier in Niwot, Colorado dropped print and is going online.

Pamplin Media Group, which owns the Portland Tribune and other community newspapers, had about 40 layoffs,
20 from newsrooms. It also cut employee hours by 60%.
Alden Global Capital’s MediaNews Group had layoffs and furloughs. Newsrooms include The Denver Post, the
Boston Herald and several in California. San Jose Mercury News Guild tweeted “the entire sports staff of The
Mercury News and East Bay Times are being furloughed.”
There were also furloughs and layoffs at the 11 newspapers that make up Southern California News Group.

The Philadelphia Public Record announced it was going on hiatus on April 2. 
On April 4, the Appeal-Democrat in Marysville, California told readers it was moving to a five-day-a-week print schedule. 
The Appeal-Democrat told Poynter it laid off three positions (one was open) and hours were reduced by 20%.
The Jessup (Georgia) Press-Sentinel had cuts in hours and pay.
The Dallas Morning News had pay cuts.

The Rural Messenger in Haven, Kansas, told Poynter five staffers have been furloughed and it’s temporarily dropped print.
The Paducah Sun in Kentucky told readers that it’s dropping its Saturday print edition “for the foreseeable future.”
The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washington announced it’s dropping its Saturday print edition “for the first time in
more than a century.”

Forum News Service reported layoffs and the end of Monday and Friday print in its “more than two-dozen newspapers
in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin.”
Shaw Media told subscribers that it’s cutting some print. Shaw also had layoffs and furloughs, Poynter learned.
In Iowa, The Oskaloosa Herald and The Daily Iowegian stopped Thursday publication.
The Provo (Utah) Daily Herald stopped printing its Sunday edition.
McClatchy furloughed 4.4% of staff at its 30 papers around the country.

Tribune Publishing announced permanent pay cuts of between 2% and 10% and executives will take pay cuts.
Tribune newsrooms include the Chicago Tribune, New York Daily News, The Baltimore Sun and The Virginian-Pilot.
It also had furloughs.
The Daily Clintonian in western Indiana stopped publishing and closed.
Landmark Community Newspapers, which owns publications in 12 states, had a cut in hours.

Aspen (Colorado) Daily News furloughed reporters.
Boulder Weekly furloughed some staff and cut freelancers.
The Anniston (Alabama) Star had one layoff, one early retirement and that one employee stepped down.
The Los Angeles Times had furloughs and pay cuts.
Advance Local newsrooms announced pay cuts and furloughs. Advance Local has newsrooms in nine markets.

LA Times that parent company California Times closed three community newspapers and laid off 14 staff members.
“Final editions of the Glendale News-Press and the Burbank Leader are planned for Saturday.
The La Cañada Valley Sun sets April 23, with its final issue.”
The Gloucester Daily Times announced it was cutting Tuesday and Saturday print.

On April 23, Eden Prairie News and Lakeshore Weekly News in Minnesota announced it will stop publishing.
On April 24, North Jefferson News in Gardendale, Alabama, announced it was merging with sister paper The Cullman Times.
Washington Times instituted 10% pay cuts and most freelance contracts were suspended, Poynter learned.

M Roberts Media, with six newspapers in Texas, cut Monday print editions and instituted temporary pay cuts for employees
making $30,000 or more, Poynter learned.
The Times Leader in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania laid off three from the newsroom, Poynter learned, plus positions in pre-press,
circulation and advertising. It also cut down to four days a week of print.
Jewish Week told Poynter that as a direct result of the coronavirus, it laid off two full-time employees and one part-time employee.

The (La Grande, Oregon) Observer reported layoffs from parent company EO Media Group.  “EO Media Group, the parent
company of The Observer, Baker City Herald and 11 other newspapers across Oregon, announced on Wednesday it is laying
off 47 employees.”
Ogden Newspapers furloughed employees company-wide, Poynter has learned.

Sound Publishing in Washington state laid off 70 people in its Washington and Alaska newsrooms.
Sound Publishing owns 49 newsrooms, and the layoffs make up 20% of its workforce. Sound also suspended four print
publications in Kitsap County and reduced staff.
The Nashua (New Hampshire) Telegraph ended all but Sunday print.
The New Hampshire Union Leader furloughed 24 employees.

The New York Post had layoffs and furloughs.
The Edmond Sun in Oklahoma told readers “effective May 6, The Edmond Sun will merge with our sister newspaper,
The Norman Transcript.
CNHI, which has newspapers in more than 20 states, had layoffs, pay cuts and furloughs.
Weekly Alibi in Albuquerque, New Mexico had layoffs, Poynter learned.

The Elkhart Truth in Indiana had furloughs and a reduction in hours, Poynter learned.
Southern Community Newspapers Inc. had layoffs and pay cuts.
The Daily News in Galveston, Texas, cut down to five days of print.
The Facts in Clute, Texas, cut down to five days of print.

The Bolivar Commercial in Cleveland, Mississippi, closed at the end of April.
The Zionsville (Indiana) Times-Sentinel merged with The Lebanon Reporter and cut print from five days to three.
Both are owned by CNHI.
The Pella (Iowa) Chronicle and The Oskaloosa (Iowa) Herald will merge. Both are owned by CNHI.
The Journal Express in Iowa will merge with The Oskaloosa Herald. Both are owned by CNHI.
The Janesville (Wisconsin) Gazette will stop printing on Saturday and Sunday.

The Hastings Star Gazette, a weekly in Minnesota owned by Forum Communications Company, closed.
The Bulletin of Woodbury and Cottage Grove, a weekly in Minnesota owned by Forum Communications
Company, closed.
Lake County News Chronicle in Two Harbors Minnesota, will publish its last issue on May 22
 It is owned by Forum Communications Company.
The Daily Iowegan will merge with the Ottumwa Courier. Both are owned by CNHI.

The Zionsville Times-Sentinel in Zionsville, Indiana merged with the Lebanon Reporter.
It is owned by CNHI.
The Morehead News in Morehead, Kentucky merged with the Daily Independent in Ashland.
It is owned by CNHI.
The Grayson Journal Times in Grayson, Kentucky merged with the Daily Independent in Ashland.
It is owned by CNHI.
The Greenup County News-Times in Greenup, Kentucky merged with the Daily Independent in Ashland.
It is owned by CNHI.
The Rushville Republican in Rushville, Indiana merged with the Greensburg Daily News in Greensburg.
It is owned by CNHI.
The Batesville Herald Tribune in Batesville, Indiana merged with the Greensburg Daily News in Greensburg.
It is owned by CNHI.
The Niagara (New York) Gazette cut down to five print days a week.
It is owned by CNHI.

The Forum (Fargo, North Dakota and Moorehead, Minnesota) will cut to two print days a week and use the
mail to deliver the newspaper, eliminating carrier jobs and most of circulation. It is owned by Forum Communications.
NUVO, a 30-year-old alt-magazine in Indianapolis, closed. It later announced it would reopen as online-only.

The Duluth News Tribune will cut down to two print days a week. It will be sent via mail.
Circulation and delivery jobs will be cut. It is owned by Forum Communications.
The Merkel (Texas) Mail closed. It started in 1890 and was locally owned.

Seven McClatchy newspapers will move out of their newsrooms and work remotely for the rest of the year.
They are the Miami Herald, the Charlotte (North Carolina) Observer, the McClatchy D.C. office, The State in Columbia,
South Carolina, The Modesto (California) Bee, the Merced (California) Sun-Star and the San Luis Obispo (California) Tribune.

The De Smet News in De Smet, South Dakota closed, and The Lake Preston Times in Lake Preston, South Dakota closed.
But community volunteers took over and combined them to create the Kingsbury Journal.
The Glasgow Daily Times in Glasgow, Kentucky told readers it was going online only and closing its building.
A newsroom staffer tweeted that staff had all been terminated. It is owned by CNHI.
Hendricks County Flyer in Indiana closed. It is owned by CNHI.
Mineral Wells Index in Mineral Wells, Texas closed. It is owned by CNHI.
The Kokomo (Indiana) Tribune will cut down to five days of print a week. It is owned by CNHI.

The Seattle Times will have a cut in hours and pay.
Gannett closed the Edinburg Review and the Valley Town Crier in McAllen, Texas.
Wayne County Outlook in Kentucky converted to digital only. However, nothing has been published on the site since May 28.
An editor tells Poynter staff is in the process of converting to digital. It is owned by CNHI.
C-ville Weekly in Charlottesville, Virginia laid off one third of its staff.

The Honolulu Star-Advertiser announced it would cut 29 positions. After an agreement with the guild, it cut 12.
The New Sharon (Iowa) Sun will close on June 18. It is owned by Mid-America Publishing.
The Keota (Iowa) Eagle will close June 17. It is merging with The News-Review. Both are owned by Mid-America Publishing.
The Independent-Enterprise in Payette, Idaho will close on June 24. It is owned by Wick Communications.
The Argonaut, a weekly in California, laid off staff.

San Diego City Beat, an alt-weekly, has paused publication.
The Minneapolis Star Tribune has had four days of furloughs in both quarter two and quarter three for newsroom and non-newsroom
employees, excluding production plant employees and fleet drivers, the Star Tribune told Poynter.
Bay Area News Group, which includes The Mercury News in San Jose and the East Bay Times in Contra Costa and Alameda counties,
had layoffs. It is owned by Alden’s Media News Group.
The Chicago Reader will now print every two weeks instead of weekly.

M Roberts Media cut several positions in a restructuring, including the editor of the Longview (Texas) News-Journal and the editor
of the Victoria (Texas) Advocate.
The New York Times cut 68 jobs, mostly in advertising.
.....................................................................................................................

Television
TEGNA announced furloughs and pay cuts company-wide. According to Poynter’s Al Tompkins, “TEGNA is the first of the big
TV owners to announce such cuts.”
Executives at E.W. Scripps Co. are taking voluntary salary reductions.
Univision had layoffs, furloughs and pay cuts. 
NBCUniversal is cutting executive pay by 20%.
CBS announced several rounds of layoffs – first 50 from CBS News, then an additional 400 at ViacomCBS.
The Golf Channel will have lay offs.

KPBS in San Diego had layoffs and a reduction in hours.
Radio
Meruelo Media had furloughs. Meruelo has stations in five markets.
Forever Media had layoffs . Forever has stations in 11 markets.

Townsquare Media Group had pay cuts and layoffs.  Townsquare has stations and sites in 67 markets.
iHeartMedia had furloughs and pay cuts.  iHeart has stations in 153 markets.
JVC Broadcasting furloughed some employees. JVC has stations in New York and Florida.

American General Media had layoffs, . American General Media has stations in seven markets.
Beasley Media had layoffs, pay cuts and furloughs. Beasley has stations in 15 markets.
Entercom had layoffs, pay cuts and furloughs. Entercom has stations in 46 markets.
Radio One/Urban One had layoffs and furloughs. The company owns stations in 15 markets.

Cumulus had temporary furloughs and pay cuts. Cumulus owns 424 stations in 87 markets.
Alpha Media had layoffs, furloughs and reduced hours. Alpha Media has stations in 21 states.
NPR had pay cuts for executives and cut pay and benefits.
Minnesota Public Radio had 14 people accept voluntary buyouts. It also had voluntary furloughs.

St. Louis Public Radio had layoffs and pay cuts, Poynter has learned. The layoffs include three full-time positions
and two part-time positions.
Hubbard Radio stations had layoffs in St. Louis, Chicago, Seattle, Minneapolis and Phoenix.
American Public Media announced buyouts and furloughs, including at MPR News in Minnesota.
Fourteen people took voluntary buyouts and the same number took voluntary furloughs.
Minnesota Public Radio and American Public Media laid off 28 people.

WBUR in Boston will lay off 29 people.
Chicago Public Media, the parent company of WBEZ in Chicago, laid off 12 people.
Houston Public Media eliminated eight positions and, at least for now, cut 15 part-time staffers.

Digital media
BuzzFeed cut employee pay, cut AM to DM, its morning news show.
Eight people lost their jobs, and had furloughs of some staff. BuzzFeed News staff also took pay cuts and will
implement a workshare plan to prevent further furloughs.

VTDigger, a nonprofit digital news site in Vermont, announced its first three layoffs since launching 10 years ago.
Vice cut some pay and stopped 401K matching and promotions.
The Outline laid off its staff.

Bustle Digital Group laid off two dozen staffers and implemented pay cuts, according to Sara Jerde in AdWeek.
G/O Media, which includes sites such as Jezebel, Deadspin, The Root and The Onion, laid off 14 employees.
Group Nine laid off 7% of staff. Group Nine publications include The Dodo, Thrillist and NowThis.
The Hill was implementing pay cuts.

Altice’s i24 and Cheddar had layoffs. On April 24, J. Clara Chan reported for The Wrap that Cheddar shut down its
Los Angeles studio.
Vox furloughed more than 100 people for three months.
Protocol had layoffs.
The Skimm cut 20% of editorial staff.
Curbed Atlanta, a Vox Media newsroom, will stop publishing for three months. Its editor was furloughed.
Quartz will lay off 80 employees.

Vice will lay off 55 people in the U.S. and 100 outside the U.S.
Playboy laid off its editorial staff.
Microsoft laid off 50 journalists in the U.S.
The Athletic laid off 46 people.

“Numerous editorial staffers” at SB Nation took buyouts.
The Weather Company had dozens of layoffs. Its publications include Weather.com and Weather Underground.
Atlas Obscura laid off 15, including five in editorial, the company confirmed to Poynter.
.....................................................................................................................

Magazines, city magazines
Washingtonian magazine laid off fellows and had 10% pay cuts.
Time Out group suspended print editions of 40 city magazines.
San Diego Magazine laid off nearly its whole staff.
D Magazine in Dallas reported layoffs and salary cuts.

Maven Media Brands, which operates Sports Illustrated, had layoffs and pay cuts.
CQ Roll Call laid off 30 staffers.
Conde Nast had pay cuts, furloughs and potential layoffs at Condé Nast. It publishes magazines including Vogue,
Vanity Fair and the New Yorker. Layoffs did follow.

Valence Media had layoffs. It owns trade magazines, including The Hollywood Reporter and Billboard.
Fortune Magazine had layoffs and pay cuts.
Meredith, which owns magazines including People and Entertainment Weekly and 17 local TV stations, had pay cuts.
San Diego Home and Garden closed. It was 41-years-old.
The Atlantic laid off 68.

Outside Magazine had furloughs and pay cuts.
California Sunday Magazine will go online only.
Pittsburgh Magazine laid off most of its staff.
Cruise Travel magazine closed.

.....................................................................................................................

Meanwhile, in the UK...


Quote:More than 2,000 newspaper jobs hit as hundreds of publications across UK face Covid-19 cuts.

'More than 2,000 staff across the UK’s national and regional press have temporarily lost their jobs as a
result of the coronavirus outbreak, Press Gazette research has found.

Across the country, news publishers have been furloughing staff, cutting wages and suspending print titles
to cope with collapsing advertising and print sale revenues brought on by the pandemic.
In total, according to Press Gazette research, more than 500 publications –mainly local and regional
newspapers –have made, or face, cuts due to coronavirus. Each of the publications is mapped below.

[Image: attachment.php?aid=8038]

For now, the majority of the more than 2,000 staff put on paid leave are non-editorial workers.
By and large, news reporters have avoided furlough, as demand for news about the virus has resulted in
record traffic online.

But Douglas McCabe, media analyst at Enders, has predicted that 5,000 print journalists in the UK could
lost their jobs without state subsidies. To arrive at our figure, Press Gazette took furlough numbers where
reported and, where only a percentage was given, calculated a number based on the number of employees
at the company given in its latest full-year accounts...'
Archived Source:

National press
Reach (Mirror, Express and Star)
Accounts for year to end of December 2019
– Employees: 4,658
– Turnover: £702.5m
– Pre-tax profit: £150.6m
Reach is the UK’s largest news publisher. It owns the Mirror, Express, and Star national daily and Sunday titles
and their associated websites. On 6 April 2020, Reach announced it would furlough one fifth of its staff, paying
them 90 per cent of their salaries.

About 940 of Reach’s staff have been furloughed, according to the National Union of Journalists.
A number of the journalists affected work in sport. Staff who remain are having their wages cut by ten per cent,
rising to 20 per cent for senior managers and senior editorial staff, as well as the board.

News UK (Sun and Times)
– Employees: (1,125 editorial)
News UK publishes the Sun and Times titles. On 17 April it asked staff to volunteer for unpaid leave or reduce
their working hours, with a corresponding cut in pay. Staff were also told to take a third of their remaining annual
leave, plus two days, before the end of June 2020.
The group said it was not planning to apply for the Government’s coronavirus job retention scheme, so will not
furlough staff.

DMGT (Mail, Metro and i)
Accounts for year to end of September 2019
– Employees: 6,101 (2,292 in media)
– Turnover: £1.4bn
– Pre-tax profit: £145m
The owner of the Daily Mail, Mail on Sunday, Mail Online and Metro titles has not furloughed staff, but has instead
offered them shares in the company to compensate them for taking a pay cut during the pandemic.

Staff who earn more than £40,000 a year at DMG Media –DMGT’s publishing arm –are being asked to take a pay
cut of between 1 per cent, for the lowest earners, and 26 per cent, for the highest earners.
Those who agree will be offered a monthly grant of shares in DMG Media parent company DMGT to the same value
as their pay sacrifice.
Free newspaper the Metro is understood to have cut its circulation.

City AM
– Employees: 55
As a free newspaper, City AM has been one of the hardest hit by the downturn in advertising caused by the coronavirus
pandemic. Its distribution model was reliant on commuters picking up copies of the paper at transport hubs, but most
people are now staying at home.

At the end of March Press Gazette reported that it was putting a majority of staff on furlough. It has also suspended its
print and digital editions, however its rolling news website continues to operate daily.
Press Gazette understands about 40 staff have been furloughed.

Evening Standard
Accounts for year to end of September 2018
– Employees: 357
– Turnover: £65.4m
– Pre-tax loss: £11.6m
The Evening Standard has been forced to change its distribution model from handouts at stations in the capital to home
deliveries for the first time ever and has cut its print run from 800,000 to 500,000 copies a day.

A proportion of full-time staff at the paper have been placed on furlough from April, while those who remain will face a 20
per cent cut in their salaries, but only if they earn more than £37,500 a year.
Weekly supplement ES Magazine has been suspended for two months.

Independent Digital news and Media 
Accounts for year to end of September 2019
– Employees: 196
– Turnover: £27m
– Pre-tax profit: £2.3m
The Independent told employees on 24 April that a “very limited number of staff” would be put on furlough and that wages
for all remaining staff would be cut by 20 per cent, except those earning below £37,500 a year. [$46839.00]

Telegraph Media Group
Accounts for year to end of December 2018
– Employees: 1,149 (611 editorial)
– Turnover: 271.4m
– Pre-tax profit: £0.9m
Telegraph Media Group, publisher of the Telegraph, Sunday Telegraph has furloughed 90 non-editorial staff until the end of
May, while those who remain will face a 20 per cent pay cut, including executives, and work a four-day week from 1 May.
Editorial staff are as yet unaffected by these measures.

Guardian Media Group
Accounts for year to end of March 2019
– Employees: 1,437 (860 editorial)
– Turnover: £224.5m
– Pre-tax profit: £30.8m
The Guardian Media Group, publisher of the Guardian, Observer and theguardian.com, has furloughed 100 non-editorial
staff and suspended pay rises for six months, as of 15 April 2020.
Managers face a 20 per cent pay cut and board and (owner) Scott Trust members a 30 per cent cut for six months.

The group said it expects revenue to be down by £20m in the first half of the 2020/21 financial year, which started in April.
The measures will save it several million pounds, but it still expects a large budget shortfall.

Financial Times
Accounts for year to end of December 2018
– Employees: 1,297
– Turnover: £323.6m
– Pre-tax profit: £8.2m
The Financial Times was one of the first newsbrands to get staff to work from home rather than the office.
The FT reported on 15 April that 20 non-editorial staff had been furloughed. Of those continuing to work, 80 managers
and editors are taking a ten per cent wage cut for the rest of 2020, with board pay down by 20 per cent.
FT chief executive John Ridding till take a 30 per cent pay cut. The annual bonus scheme has also been suspended
and pension contributions halved temporarily.

PA Media Group
Accounts for year to end of December 2018
– Employees: 859
– Turnover: £70.2m
– Pre-tax profit: £3.3m
PA Media Group confirmed on 31 March that a quarter of its staff (about 215 people) “whose work has effectively ceased”
would be furloughed from 1 April. Those furloughed include 39 sports journalists and five racing journalists for the news wire.
News journalists were not affected, however.
On 8 April it emerged that the group was in introducing a graded wage cut in further Covid-19 measures.

Regional press
Reach
Reach owns a number of regional newspapers, including dailies the Manchester Evening News, Birmingham Mail and
Liverpool Echo. It also has a network of “Live” regional news websites.
Reach has suspended five regional free titles in action to mitigate the impact of Covid-19. The titles all publish their last
editions in early April.
The affected titles are: Manchester Weekly News, Sutton Coldfield Observer, Lichfield Mercury, Midweek Visiter, and
Blackmore Vale Magazine.

Archant
Accounts for year to end of December 2018
– Employees: 1,277
– Turnover: £87.3m
– Pre-tax loss: £7.6m
Archant told staff in April that it was putting a “small number” of them on furlough. Press Gazette understands this is about
ten per cent of staff. The publisher said furloughed staff would be those whose work had “disappeared” or had been
“radically reduced” by the Covid-19 crisis.
Archant publishes a number of regional weekly and daily titles, including the Eastern Daily Press.

JPI Media
JPI Media has yet to file its first accounts with Companies House.
JPI Media, which owns the Yorkshire Post and Scotsman titles, has put 350 employees on furlough and has cut the salaries
of those who continue to work for it by up to 15 per cent, Press Gazette reported on 1 April.
It is understood that about 60 of those affected are journalists, including in sport and photography.
Furloughs are likely to last for at least three weeks. The publisher also suspended 11 free newspaper titles and one free
magazine from 30 March amid concerns over home deliveries.

Newsquest Media Group
Accounts for year to end of December 2018
– Employees: 2,413 (650 editorial)
– Turnover: £197.3m
– Pre-tax profit: £108m
Press Gazette reported on 24 March that Newsquest was placing a “significant number” of its staff on furlough, while all
those who remain will face a wage cut. It is understood about ten per cent of Newsquest’s 650 editorial staff have been
put on furlough, with advertising staff mainly affected.
Newsquest publishes a number of weekly and daily newspapers, including the Herald in Scotland and Carlisle News
and Star.

Iliffe Media Group
Accounts for year to end of March 2019
– Employees: 319
– Turnover: £22.7m
– Pre-tax loss: £10.6m
Iliffe Media Group has furloughed about a quarter of its staff (roughly 80 people), including 30 journalists whose workload
has decreased, such as those covering sport.
South London Press
The 150-year-old bi-weekly South London Press has furloughed half of its dozen staff and is asking readers for donations
to help with its running costs as advertising has “plummeted” during the Covid-19 lockdown.

B2B
Metropolis Group
Accounts for year to end of December 2018
Employees: 452 (146 editorial)
Turnover: £52.65m
Pre-tax profit: £4m
Media and events business Metropolis group, which owns 40 B2B brands under Emap and three consumer-focused titles,
is to furlough between a quarter and a third of all its employees in the coming weeks. This could be as many as 150 staff,
according to Press Gazette calculations.
CEO Robert Marr told staff the news on 20 April 2020, saying sales were “markedly down” during pandemic.
The group had already furloughed some staff as a result of the coronavirus.
.....................................................................................................................

With respect to all those who have and will lose their jobs, for this kind of media -I say, die you smear merchants, die.
tinyok


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#62
(07-03-2020, 02:59 AM)veteranhumanbeing Wrote:
(06-30-2020, 11:05 AM)drussell41 Wrote:
(06-30-2020, 06:40 AM)Schmoe1 Wrote: Reading these responses here inspired me, we should have a weekly roast thread.  Asshole of the week or something.

tinylaughing tinylaughing tinylaughing
News cycle too fast...bung bag of the 24 hr. dive bar/blossom shop open all night variety. 
Monday-Any Seattle elected official
Tuesday- Over educated Statue trashing chicken breasted white men
Wednesday-The Chinese Communist Party for inflicting Covid19 upon the world 
Thursday-The Chinese Communist Party for creating a new gestapo surveillance force in Hong Kong
Friday-(its a tie) Bill DeBlasio's Paintbrush vs Nancy Pelosi's Dentures

It strange that every one calls something they dont like ( even I do ) the "Gestapo", but the NKVD was far worse than the Gestapo ever was. But then the NKVD belonged to Stalin, and as we all know Stalin was a good guy.
WAR IS PEACE, FREEDOM IS SLAVERY, IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH, THE EU IS FATHER AND MOTHER
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#63
(07-07-2020, 09:35 AM)BIAD Wrote:
(07-03-2020, 02:59 AM)veteranhumanbeing Wrote: News cycle too fast...bung bag of the 24 hr. dive bar/blossom shop open all night variety. 
Monday-Any Seattle elected official
Tuesday- Over educated Statue trashing chicken breasted white men
Wednesday-The Chinese Communist Party for inflicting Covid19 upon the world 
Thursday-The Chinese Communist Party for creating a new gestapo surveillance force in Hong Kong
Friday-(its a tie) Bill DeBlasio's Paintbrush vs Nancy Pelosi's Dentures

And the outcome of such a manner of reporting supposedly factual news...?
These are just in the US and sourced from here.



Quote:'This article was originally published on April 6, 2020, and has been frequently updated since.
It was last updated on June 30. We’ve also cut dates and other details, which you can find in
the related links.

It’s getting hard to keep track of the bad news about the news right now. But we have to.
Here’s our attempt to collect the layoffs, furloughs, and closures caused by the coronavirus’ critical
blow to the economy and journalism in the United States. Please send tips. We’ll try to keep up.

In most cases, these entries link to previously reported stories. In some cases, where there are no
links, we’re using relying on tips to help show the full impact of this pandemic.
One more note: We haven’t figured out a way to track the loss of work for freelancers, but please read
more about how the pandemic has hurt their livelihoods here...'

It wasn't the flu that caused the MSM to fail, it was the major networks and their own brand of fake news.
But like most things in life, it's the little guy who get hurt first.
tinysure


With respect to all those who have and will lose their jobs, for this kind of media -I say, die you smear merchants, die.
tinyok
Outstanding information. They cull/eat their own without knowing what they do (it saves us the trouble).
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