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The Doc's back garden
#1
Big Grin 
They say an Englishman's home is his castle....Well dont know about that one.  Can you imagine all that dusting and cleaning of the moat? No thanks.  So will just tell you a little bit about my garden. Bought the house 3 years ago. And it was barren wasteland. Couldn't be doing with it like that.  The 1 day of summer we get, I like to sit out you see. Took a lot of digging over and removing bricks. But a lot nicer now.  Won't be winning any awards but I like it minusculebiggrin
[Image: 20200625-182536.jpg]"You're beautiful "  Floribunda Rose. Apparently rose of the year 2013



[Image: 20200625-182547.jpg]The £15 bird bath from Amazon. Gets plenty of visitors 


[Image: 20200625-182608.jpg]Venus Lady of the garden


[Image: 20200625-182625.jpg]Unsure of this Rose. I know it only cost a pound 2 years ago


[Image: 20200625-182649.jpg]Purple Thingy's (Can't remember what it is lol)


[Image: 20200625-182705.jpg]My favourite (Until you slash your leg on the thorns) "Great expectations" Another Floribunda Rose


[Image: 20200625-182713.jpg]Black bamboo (For when the Panda arrives)


[Image: 20200625-182739.jpg]Gaillardia F1 red.


[Image: 20200625-182744.jpg]Erisymum "Apricot twist"

[Image: 20200625-182752.jpg]Rhubarb. Great with Gin




[Image: 20200625-182800.jpg]"The Fairy" Patio rose 


[Image: 20200625-182804.jpg]"Perfect Match" Compact Floribunda


[Image: 20200625-182817.jpg]This area was just rubble. Made a bench and rockery with loads of shit in there 


[Image: 20200625-182839.jpg]Raspberries. Again great with gin



[Image: 20200625-182855.jpg]Blackcurrant Bush. Another Gin fruit 

[Image: 20200625-182925.jpg]This smells so nice. Recent purchase "Pink perpetue" Climbing rose

So there we have it. Just bought stuff I liked and planted. Covers up all the remains and bodies well I think tinyangry
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#2
Very nice.

Our back must have been a garbage dump.  Everywhere we dig, we have to remove construction residue, old metal, broken glass.

Cheers
[Image: 14sigsepia.jpg]

Location: The lost world, Elsewhen
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#3
Beautiful work!   minusculeclap 

My mother had a huge flower garden. She would go out every day and spend time pulling weeds, pruning the roses, watering, and anything else that needed to be done. It was the envy of all our neighbors.

We always had a live bouquet of flowers sitting on the kitchen table and in our living room all spring, summer, and fall.
I can almost smell the sweet aroma now.

I tried to raise flowers and a garden here, but our soil said NOPE, not gonna happen!
We need more top soil to grow anything other than trees.

Now, I'm too old and have too many aches and pains to work on such a project, but I do love looking at other's gardens.
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#4
(06-25-2020, 07:30 PM)F2d5thCav Wrote: Very nice.

Our back must have been a garbage dump.  Everywhere we dig, we have to remove construction residue, old metal, broken glass.

Cheers

Thanks.  Yes think everyone on the construction site must have hid the rubbish under our land  minusculebonker
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#5
(06-25-2020, 07:44 PM)TheDoctor46 Wrote:
(06-25-2020, 07:30 PM)F2d5thCav Wrote: Very nice.

Our back must have been a garbage dump.  Everywhere we dig, we have to remove construction residue, old metal, broken glass.

Cheers

Thanks.  Yes think everyone on the construction site must have hid the rubbish under our land  minusculebonker

Heh heh.  The same crew must have worked our place as well. 😁

Cheers
[Image: 14sigsepia.jpg]

Location: The lost world, Elsewhen
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#6
(06-25-2020, 07:33 PM)Mystic Wanderer Wrote: Beautiful work!   minusculeclap 

My mother had a huge flower garden. She would go out every day and spend time pulling weeds, pruning the roses, watering, and anything else that needed to be done. It was the envy of all our neighbors.

We always had a live bouquet of flowers sitting on the kitchen table and in our living room all spring, summer, and fall.
I can almost smell the sweet aroma now.

I tried to raise flowers and a garden here, but our soil said NOPE, not gonna happen!
We need more top soil to grow anything other than trees.

Now, I'm too old and have too many aches and pains to work on such a project, but I do love looking at other's gardens.
Thank you  minusculebeercheers.  Yes I had to bring in loads and loads of topsoil. The stuff that was here was more like stones with clay  tinysure . Its harbwork sometimes keeping on top of things with work etc. But when it's in bloom it's great to sit out  and enjoy.  Wow your mums garden sounded really nice. Cant beat cut fresh flowers  minusculebiggrin
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#7
(06-25-2020, 07:48 PM)F2d5thCav Wrote:
(06-25-2020, 07:44 PM)TheDoctor46 Wrote:
(06-25-2020, 07:30 PM)F2d5thCav Wrote: Very nice.

Our back must have been a garbage dump.  Everywhere we dig, we have to remove construction residue, old metal, broken glass.

Cheers

Thanks.  Yes think everyone on the construction site must have hid the rubbish under our land  minusculebonker

Heh heh.  The same crew must have worked our place as well. ?

Cheers

I'm sure I could have built another house with all the bricks I've dug out lol
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#8
Beautiful Doc!  Lots and Lots of work, I know.. 

Now, I need to take some pics and show my plants. ... Pear tree full of pears, plum trees, blackberries everywhere ( they've taken over most of 6 acres)  pecan tree, persimmons, sage, rosemary, four o'clock flowers, rose bushes etc.;

And, the bamboo, wisteria has taken over.  Send that panda here, it'll be happy beside my house in the bamboo forest we can't get rid of.   tinyhuh  I used to have muscadines (like grapes) the bamboo has killed it.   minusculecrybaby
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#9
(06-25-2020, 07:56 PM)DaphneApollo Wrote: Beautiful Doc!  Lots and Lots of work, I know.. 

Now, I need to take some pics and show my plants. ... Pear tree full of pears, plum trees, blackberries everywhere ( they've taken over most of 6 acres)  pecan tree, persimmons, sage, rosemary, four o'clock flowers, rose bushes etc.;

And, the bamboo, wisteria has taken over.  Send that panda here, it'll be happy beside my house in the bamboo forest we can't get rid of.   tinyhuh  I used to have muscadines (like grapes) the bamboo has killed it.   minusculecrybaby

Hi Daphne  minusculebiggrin. Wow your garden sounds great and huge! Yes I know wisteria can grow like wildfire but it is beautiful when it's in bloom. Hehe yes you could do with a panda or 2  minusculebiggrin
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#10
Here Doc -and by the way, your gardening thumb is excellent, I am seeking some advice.

On a Wednesday morning BIAD visits the mother-in-law and on the wall of her garden, she sports
a beautiful Wisteria. There are many retired old men nearby who've shook their heads when I asked
how I could take a cutting and told me it's impossible to rear one of these from a cutting.

Location: North-east England.

Any advice in how to get around this?

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#11
(06-25-2020, 09:15 PM)BIAD Wrote: Here Doc -and by the way, your gardening thumb is excellent, I am seeking some advice.

On a Wednesday morning BIAD visits the mother-in-law and on the wall of her garden, she sports
a beautiful Wisteria. There are many retired old men nearby who've shook their heads when I asked
how I could take a cutting and told me it's impossible to rear one of these from a cutting.

Location: North-east England.

Any advice in how to get around this?

[Image: attachment.php?aid=7913]

Cheers pal for that. Well I'm no expert but first thing what sprang to mind is taking a cutting then using rooting powder (cheap to buy at garden centers). Found this link on how to cut from the existing wisteria and hopefully start your ownhttps://www.gardenseeker.co.uk/shrubs/wi...ayers.html

I've always meant to do this with rose bushes but not got round to it yet. I'm in North West England the tropical bit near Bolton!!!!
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#12
(06-25-2020, 09:34 PM)TheDoctor46 Wrote: Cheers pal for that. Well I'm no expert but first thing what sprang to mind is taking a cutting then using rooting powder (cheap to buy at garden centers). Found this link on how to cut from the existing wisteria and hopefully start your ownhttps://www.gardenseeker.co.uk/shrubs/wi...ayers.html

I've always meant to do this with rose bushes but not got round to it yet. I'm in North West England the tropical bit near Bolton!!!!

The thing is, I tuck a cutting of three of the tendrils wisterias fire out at this time of the year and simply
put in a cut-down milk carton with some water. They were alive for over a week and so -with rooting powder,
chanced them in some soil and crossed my fingers.

Nope... wouldn't have it. They died a day later. It's just I don;t know how to promote roots whilst keeping
them in water -where they seem to be okay. It's a puzzle!
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#13
(06-25-2020, 09:39 PM)BIAD Wrote:
(06-25-2020, 09:34 PM)TheDoctor46 Wrote: Cheers pal for that. Well I'm no expert but first thing what sprang to mind is taking a cutting then using rooting powder (cheap to buy at garden centers). Found this link on how to cut from the existing wisteria and hopefully start your ownhttps://www.gardenseeker.co.uk/shrubs/wi...ayers.html

I've always meant to do this with rose bushes but not got round to it yet. I'm in North West England the tropical bit near Bolton!!!!

The thing is, I tuck a cutting of three of the tendrils wisterias fire out at this time of the year and simply
put in a cut-down milk carton with some water. They were alive for over a week and so -with rooting powder,
chanced them in some soil and crossed my fingers.

Nope... wouldn't have it. They died a day later. It's just I don;t know how to promote roots whilst keeping
them in water -where they seem to be okay. It's a puzzle!

I feel your pain. I've had many plants die out of nowhere.  It seems to be about humidity and keeping them watered. Found thishttps://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamen...ttings.htm
Sounds like now is the perfect time to do this as well
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#14
(06-25-2020, 09:46 PM)TheDoctor46 Wrote: I feel your pain. I've had many plants die out of nowhere.  It seems to be about humidity and keeping them watered. Found thishttps://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamen...ttings.htm
Sounds like now is the perfect time to do this as well


minusculethumbsup  Cheers, I'll find a way, I will not be deterred!!!
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#15
You've done wonders there Doc.  

Great story and pics,

look after that statue!

Kind regards,

Bally:)
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#16
(06-26-2020, 02:32 AM)Bally002 Wrote: You've done wonders there Doc.  

Great story and pics,

look after that statue!

Kind regards,

Bally:)

Thanks Bally and certainly will  minusculebiggrin
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#17
Nice, but where's the new bar?? LOL

We're lucky to live in a rural village and have a good sized garden at the front and back.
My youngest has recently decided that we needed a Pond and a Bug Hotel!

So, we sorted it out using a big old dish-shaped concrete planter for the pond and a stack of old wood and stuff, topped with the turf we lifted to "dig-in" the pond, for the bug hotel!
We've got lawns front & back. The front one bordered with flower beds and rockery. The back garden also homes our little veggie / fruit plot. Not got too much going on this year, a few peas / strawberries.... oh, and tomato plants in the conservatory!

My current (and first) wife Chrissie is more green-fingered than me, but I do quite enjoy iy in small doses!

Thanks for sharing!!

G
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#18
Your flowers are so pretty! I have to put most of mine in planters because my soil has too many rocks. If I try to plant anything in the ground it dies. 

I’ve tried building up my soil, especially in the vegetable garden, but I’m thinking it’s time to get a truckload of topsoil.
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#19
(06-26-2020, 10:55 PM)VioletDove Wrote: Your flowers are so pretty! I have to put most of mine in planters because my soil has too many rocks. If I try to plant anything in the ground it dies. 

I’ve tried building up my soil, especially in the vegetable garden, but I’m thinking it’s time to get a truckload of topsoil.

Thank you for that  minusculebiggrin.  Yes my front garden is like that. Very stoney with bits of glass in for some reason!. Some stuff does ok and other stuff just withers away a bit like me when it's too hot!!. Keep saying I will dig all soil out and change it. But it's a fair old job lol. Btw welcome to Rogue Nation minusculebeercheers
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#20
Hi Doc,

Thought I would share with you a view of some of the treasures we've unearthed from our soil tinybiggrin

[Image: 20200627-091010.jpg]

Cheers
[Image: 14sigsepia.jpg]

Location: The lost world, Elsewhen
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