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Strangely-Worded News Articles.
#1
I've been noticing this for some time and felt that maybe it's just my contempt of the current lazy Journalism.
But there's been articles that seem to mock the reader or maybe even humour them with the use of a certain
wording exploit.

I'm kicking myself that I never collected the others that put me onto this, but the articles are out there and I will
search for them. They seemed to increased lately where (and I'm just making these two-up)... a guy crashes his
crop-spraying plane somewhere and the pilot is called Pete Fallen or a dog goes missing and its owner's surname
is 'Fleeing'! I know it sounds silly, but the tales are there.

I saw this one via a Tim Pool video and was surprised again that nobody has picked up on the strange facets
of this particular story. I hope other RN members can add to this thread with other accounts where names,
locations and similar anomalies indicate that the story holds an 'odd' slant to it.

Here's the outline of the incident :
Sydney, Australia. A drug-fuelled transgender male attacked customers at a local store with an axe.
The prison sentence was recently increased due to the victims demanding so.
(See here for the full article. The Guardian)

Fine, another crazy does something terrible. But look at the names of those involved.

"...Amati, who had recently transitioned to a woman, attacked Ben Rimmer and Sharon Hacker inside a 7-Eleven at
Enmore in January 2017 and then chased down nearby pedestrian Shane Redwood...'

'Hacker, Redwood' and 'Rimmer' (Merriam-Webster's definition: 'an implement for cutting, trimming, or ornamenting
the rim of something')... isn't this strange? In a different setting, wouldn't this story be found as suspicious?

The nearest I could get to Evie Amati was 'Amati' referred to a family of Italian violin makers, active in Cremona in the
16th and 17th centuries. But going out on a limb, the criminal's full name (without one of the 'e's) is an anagram of
'amative', a word meaning impassioned, fervent or romantic.

Maybe it's just me picking up on something that really isn't there, but I'm sure that among the many threads on our
Rogue Nation site, there are similar accounts where names and locations oddly coincide with the meaning of the
story.

Forgive me for my silliness, but I'll post them if more appear.
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#2
(08-24-2019, 10:26 AM)BIAD Wrote: I've been noticing this for some time and felt that maybe it's just my contempt of the current lazy Journalism.
But there's been articles that seem to mock the reader or maybe even humour them with the use of a certain
wording exploit.

I'm kicking myself that I never collected the others that put me onto this, but the articles are out there and I will
search for them. They seemed to increased lately where (and I'm just making these two-up)... a guy crashes his
crop-spraying plane somewhere and the pilot is called Pete Fallen or a dog goes missing and its owner's surname
is 'Fleeing'! I know it sounds silly, but the tales are there.

I saw this one via a Tim Pool video and was surprised again that nobody has picked up on the strange facets
of this particular story. I hope other RN members can add to this thread with other accounts where names,
locations and similar anomalies indicate that the story holds an 'odd' slant to it.

Here's the outline of the incident :
Sydney, Australia. A drug-fuelled transgender male attacked customers at a local store with an axe.
The prison sentence was recently increased due to the victims demanding so.
(See here for the full article. The Guardian)

Fine, another crazy does something terrible. But look at the names of those involved.

"...Amati, who had recently transitioned to a woman, attacked Ben Rimmer and Sharon Hacker inside a 7-Eleven at
Enmore in January 2017 and then chased down nearby pedestrian Shane Redwood...'

'Hacker, Redwood' and 'Rimmer' (Merriam-Webster's definition: 'an implement for cutting, trimming, or ornamenting
the rim of something')... isn't this strange? In a different setting, wouldn't this story be found as suspicious?

The nearest I could get to Evie Amati was 'Amati' referred to a family of Italian violin makers, active in Cremona in the
16th and 17th centuries. But going out on a limb, the criminal's full name (without one of the 'e's) is an anagram of
'amative', a word meaning impassioned, fervent or romantic.

Maybe it's just me picking up on something that really isn't there, but I'm sure that among the many threads on our
Rogue Nation site, there are similar accounts where names and locations oddly coincide with the meaning of the
story.

Forgive me for my silliness, but I'll post them if more appear.

minusculegoodjob  I think you are Right!
Once A Rogue, Always A Rogue!
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#3
You aren't silly. Someone else pointed out odd names like this in a video, but I listen to so many of them it would be hard for me to remember which one.

Yes, I have come across weird names too, but after a slight eyebrow raised, it vanished from my conspiracy mindset as I further went down into the rabbit hole of the article.

Good topic to dig into.  I'll bring any names I come across in the future to this thread, for sure.
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#4
(08-24-2019, 08:08 PM)Mystic Wanderer Wrote: You aren't silly. Someone else pointed out odd names like this in a video, but I listen to so many of them it would be hard for me to remember which one.

Yes, I have come across weird names too, but after a slight eyebrow raised, it vanished from my conspiracy mindset as I further went down into the rabbit hole of the article.

Good topic to dig into.  I'll bring any names I come across in the future to this thread, for sure.

Thank you... it's like the Jeffrey Epstein and the Robert Epstein stuff coming together. Dr. Robert Epstein has been
accusing Google of its bias for years, but only lately as it really surfaced.

But in regards of the odd surname in articles, I do believe there's something to it.
minusculethumbsup
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#5
I was watching a David Attenborough documentary YESTERDAY about Bio-Luminescence in DEEP SEA CREATURES...
The Chief Scientist on the Deep Seas Research Boat they used was called.... (Prof.) Haddock!

I shit you not.

G
tinybighuh Being Rogue is WEIRD, But I LIKE IT!tinyfunny 
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#6
(08-24-2019, 09:14 PM)gordi Wrote: I was watching a David Attenborough documentary YESTERDAY about Bio-Luminescence in DEEP SEA CREATURES...
The Chief Scientist on the Deep Seas Research Boat they used was called.... (Prof.) Haddock!

I shit you not.

G

Exactly!!! tinylaughing
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#7
Ninurta flagged up another one of these anomalies in a Yahoo post provided by Mystic Wanderer in the 'Shout Box'.

'...Five people were taken to Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare for treatment.
Interim Police Chief Steve Outlaw said at a news conference "you can't help but wonder" whether the anniversary
of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks was a factor in the attack, but police found no evidence of any connections...'
LINK:
............................................

Weirdly after posting the above offering, I went to peruse the latest news for today Thursday 10th Sept 2019
and noticed this headline on the BBC website on UK news.

'Rape convictions at lowest level since records began.'

Wondering why this article portrayed in the manner the headline suggests, I clicked onto a ink in the article titled
'Why are rape prosecutions falling?' and discovered another one of these strange names.
It's from April of this year.

'...Police and prosecutors are asking complainants in rape cases to agree to hand their phones over or face the
prospect of prosecutions being dropped - something victims' commissioner Baroness Helen Newlove has said is
"unlikely to do anything to help reverse the fall in prosecutions for rape and sexual violence"...'

Strange!
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