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I have killed two of these this year
#1
If one of these bites you by everything I have heard you will be in severe pain for a few days if not dead. I do a catch and release for most things but not this..

[/url] I think Arizona has some of these too...
Scolopendra centipede. One of the most toxic creepy crawlies in this neck of the woods. 
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#2
Be careful 727Sky. 

We have poisonous centipedes here too, but they don't look like that.
That is an ugly bugger right there.

I have noticed that many things poisonous have the color red/orange on them somewhere. Is this nature's way of making them stand out so we can see them? 
Of course, there are many things that don't have bright colors too, like certain snakes and scorpions, etc.

I often wonder what The Creator was thinking when He/She made these creatures? Especially yellow jackets! What purpose do they serve except to scare the poop out of people and make them sick, or possibly die?
Nature's way of thinning the population?

Okay, I'm rambling. I'll stop now.
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#3
@727Sky 
Yes we have them here, in the higher elevations, really big ones under tree stumps and leaves.
In the desert you find them near a wash and under rocks.
Rick normally kills them with Great Pleasure.
Once A Rogue, Always A Rogue!
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#4
(04-29-2019, 03:03 PM)Mystic Wanderer Wrote: Be careful 727Sky. 

We have poisonous centipedes here too, but they don't look like that.
That is an ugly bugger right there.

I have noticed that many things poisonous have the color red/orange on them somewhere. Is this nature's way of making them stand out so we can see them? 
Of course, there are many things that don't have bright colors too, like certain snakes and scorpions, etc.

I often wonder what The Creator was thinking when He/She made these creatures? Especially yellow jackets! What purpose do they serve except to scare the poop out of people and make them sick, or possibly die?
Nature's way of thinning the population?

Okay, I'm rambling.  I'll stop now.

You know, when Grace and I were moving back here from Kansas City, I told her we were moving to a rain forest. On the way, when we were in Eastern Kentucky (and it was in July), the deep blue-green of the trees, the canopy cover on the mountains, and the mist rising through the trees nearly convinced her.

That first winter argued against it.

However, in either the first or second month in this house, I ran into one of the centipedes. I normally keep my clothes in a chair near the bed so I can jump up and jump into them with little or no notice. I was going in to work at 7 am at the time, so it was early morning when I got up. Started to put my clothes on, and one of the little bastards fell out of my clothes onto the floor. It died a horrendous death, but I could feel centipedes crawling all over my body the rest of that day.

It wasn't a big one, only about 3 or 4 inches long or so and looked just like the one in the photo (but smaller), but what creeped me out was that it was in the house, and got hid in my clothes, and had to climb a chair leg to do that. It was like the little bugger was aiming for me. Made my skin crawl all day. I started banging my boots out like I did back in the day after that. Creepy crawlies (spiders, centipedes, scorpions, snakes, etc.) in the jungle just LOVE to hide out in your boots, and wait for you to put them on unawares.

I pound them boots on the floor and then shake them out to this very day. Probably will the rest of my life. That first year I killed 21 spiders by shaking those boots out.

All kinds of spiders here. We have a big "Huntsman spider" that is about 6 inches or so across the legs. I call them "saber-tooth spiders" because their fangs are near a quarter inch long. My sister calls them "tarantulas", but they aren't - they not nearly as stocky as tarantulas are. I've killed about 5 of them in this house. Now, one might think those are pretty creepy, but let me tell you a story...

I went out to the laundry room one day, and there in the floor was one of those big-assed huntsman spiders. The thing is, it was laid over on it's back, with it's legs all curled up and meeting just above it's belly. Upon closer inspection, I saw that it's feet were TIED TOGETHER with spider silk. The big bastard had been hog-tied by some OTHER spider!

Nowadays, the big ass Huntsman spiders don't creep me out nearly as much as whatever spider did that to that one!

Then there are the "jumping spiders" or "dancing spiders". I don't know what they are really called, but they're mean little bastards. they attack without provocation. They're not like the little tiny black jumping spiders that are really called "Jumping spiders" - they run across the ground dancing - they kind of roll like a wobbly top when they run... and they like as not will be running straight for you. They're anywhere from an inch and a half to 3 inches across the legs. I've had them jump as high as my knees and straight AT me, maybe 2 or 3 feet forward towards me, and they only missed because I could jump or scoot backwards just as fast. They, too, die horrible, horrible deaths whenever I see one. Had one crawl up the back of my chair one evening. Grace at first thought it was the cat climbing my chair, but when she realized what it was she shrieked and pointed, and just that quick I was 5 feet away and facing the chair, with that blasted spider perched on the top of the back of it, wondering how in the hell I did that... and that was the last thought it had.

Got black widows around here, and at work, too. We killed 9 in the space of a 15 minute break one day up there, as the rain ran them out of their hidey-holes. I killed one one day that was dangling from the roof on a thread of silk, aiming for a young lady that stood there unawares. I saw it, walked up to her and tapped her on the shoulder, and said "'scuse me miss - could you step 3 feet thataway?" when she did, I grabbed it's silk string, lowered it to the ground, and lowered the boom on it. A crowd of folks around there generally took the opinion that I was crazy, playing with black widows like that, but hell, no one got bit by it, and all was well, right?

Then there are the millipedes here. Great big ones. They aren't dangerous, but they're still pretty creepy. Got too many legs, y'know? I was walking back home from my sister's house a couple hundred yards up the road one summer day, and saw something in the road which I thought was a baby snake... until I got up to it. It was one of those millipedes, the biggest one I ever saw here, that had been crossing the road when a car decided it's fate. It was about 8 or 10 inches long, but the car won that fight anyhow. I took pictures of it, because I was pretty sure that if I didn't, I'd convince myself that I was just hallucinating it a couple years down the road.

Not everything here is dangerous, though. Sure, we've got copperheads, rattle snakes, and water moccasins, but everyone around here claims every snake they see is a "copperhead". The vast majority are not. We had an infestation at work, where snakes were getting in all over the building, and every one they saw was a "copperhead". A guy caught one under my trash can one day when I was off work. It bit him as he was catching it, but he never swelled or nothing. it was just a regular snake. Another one came in through a crack in the concrete floor, but got away when a guy tried to kill it, causing me and another manager to have to spend a whole day de-snaking the place. That one wasn't really a copperhead, either. A guy killed one in the ladies bathroom and threw it out. He swore it was a copperhead, but I made him show me where it was, and it was just a corn snake. I killed one in the lobby that folks swore was a copperhead, but it was just a corn snake, too. I had to kill it to set them back at ease.

For some odd reason, the state has declared it illegal to kill rattlesnakes in this county. They can kiss my ass - I'll kill every one I can find. I reckon if I don't mention it to the state, then it must have never happened. I.E. - it ain't illegal if ya don't get caught.

Years ago, I had a friend that I spent a lot of time in the brush and  tall grass with. He's dead now, died years ago, but something he always said stuck in my mind, and will likely be there till the end of my days. He was fond of saying "in the end, the wild will win". The older I get, and the more this place changes back to wilderness and creepy critters, the more I am convinced he was right.

P.S. - Yellowjackets. Yellowjackets are a variety of hornet, and all hornets are just assholes with wings.

P.P.S. - I reckon we come by creepy crawlies honest around here. 315 million years ago, when this whole area was a coal swamp 5 degrees off the equator, there was a centipede that lived here called "Arthropleura". It was 8 feet long. Thank God there aren't any of those left...

There AREN'T any of those left, right? RIGHT?

.
" I don't mind killin' a man in a fair fight... or if I think he's gonna start a fair fight... or if there's money involved... or a woman... "

 - Jayne Cobb, Hero of Canton
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#5
After Ninurta's accounts, I'll get my coat and forget about my mouse story.
tinysure tinywondering
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#6
I was going to tell the horrors of ticks and the diseases they carry here, lyme disease, and TBE (Tick-borne encephalitis) Both of them can and have killed. TBE is found in the south in the coastal areas but is spreading inland, But im with BIAD, [b]Ninurta wins[/b]
WAR IS PEACE, FREEDOM IS SLAVERY, IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH, THE EU IS FATHER AND MOTHER
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#7
(04-30-2019, 05:07 PM)BIAD Wrote: After Ninurta's accounts, I'll get my coat and forget about my mouse story.
tinysure tinywondering

Well, I've got a couple mouse stories, too, if there's any more beer in the keg... nah, I reckon I'll save those for another day, and probably get permission to tell them first if I ever do.

This is like any other jungle, albeit a seasonal one. It has it's own peculiar denizens for the natives to get used to, and we do, just like natives all over the rest of the world.

At least all our leeches here live in water. In Sky's neck of the woods, they've got leeches that live in the damp leaves of the forest, and you don't have to go swimming to get a few stuck to ya!
" I don't mind killin' a man in a fair fight... or if I think he's gonna start a fair fight... or if there's money involved... or a woman... "

 - Jayne Cobb, Hero of Canton
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#8
(04-30-2019, 06:06 PM)Wallfire Wrote: I was going to tell the horrors of ticks and the diseases they carry here, lyme disease, and TBE (Tick-borne encephalitis) Both of them can and have killed. TBE is found in the south in the coastal areas but is spreading inland, But im with BIAD, [b]Ninurta wins[/b]

The main tick-borne diseases here are Lyme's disease and Spotted Fever. I've got a friend who is still undergoing treatments for Lyme's Disease, months after the tick was pulled off. They aren't REAL prevalent - I've only pulled 4 or 5 off of me that had a good bite over the course of a lifetime. It ain't like it was in the jungles down south. I saw ticks there hanging off the bushes so thick they looked like clusters of grapes some times.

In years when ticks are bad, these days I go buy a couple of those flea-and-tick collars for dogs, and tie them off around my knees like garters when I go out into the wild. They've worked for me so far, after I stumbled across the idea one year during a flea infestation.

About a week ago, a bear hung out around my house for several days. You could smell it inside the house when it wandered through the yard on the north side of the house, where the heat pump is. I reckon that the heat pump picked up the scent outside and pumped it through the vents into the house. It made the cat all kinds of spastic and frantic.

One of the women at work told me the other day that she was going in to work early, and drove past my house, and there was a whole herd of deer in my yard grazing. A few years ago, when I was working early, I used to get up and go sit outside to drink coffee and smoke to get my day started, and I'd watch the deer in my yard. I reckon they got used to it, and figured out that I wasn't going to shoot them so close to the house, because after a while they just stopped paying any attention to me at all. There is a grove of paw-paw trees in the upper edge of my yard on the north side of the house, and they like to play there. Paw-paws are an Appalachian variant of the papaya, the only sort of papaya that grows this far north. Deer won't eat them, but I reckon bears will - but hell, bears will eat ANYTHING!

I've also got a couple of American Chestnut trees overhanging the house. they are rare now, since the blight hit them a hundred years ago and nearly wiped out the entire species. Those chestnuts do draw the deer in, though. They are a pain in the ass to shell out, though, because of the burrs on the shells. Sting like fire when the burrs nick you.

Magnolias are blooming now as well. The entire time I was growing up, just one county away, I never, EVER saw a magnolia. I never saw one until I moved to a more southern clime. Now, they are everywhere here.  I reckon there must be something to the global warming thing, although I can't force myself to believe it's "man made" global warming. Still, it is getting warmer. When I was a boy, an old man here told me how the rivers froze over every winter when HE was a boy, solid enough to take horse teams and sleds out onto them and cut ice blocks for the ice houses they had back then. Now I'M the old man, and I see species here that were limited to warmer regions when I was the boy. They've migrated north, it seems, with the warmer weather. I've only seen the rivers freeze over here a couple of times, where it used to be a regular yearly occurrence. Winter before last, we had a 3 week spell when the temperatures never got above 25 degrees Fahrenheit, and the rivers froze over then... but that is unusual these days.

Warmer temperatures mean more bugs and creepy crawlies in the summer months...

... because, in the end, the wild will win.

.
" I don't mind killin' a man in a fair fight... or if I think he's gonna start a fair fight... or if there's money involved... or a woman... "

 - Jayne Cobb, Hero of Canton
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#9
(04-30-2019, 08:47 AM)Ninurta Wrote:
(04-29-2019, 03:03 PM)Mystic Wanderer Wrote: Be careful 727Sky. 

We have poisonous centipedes here too, but they don't look like that.
That is an ugly bugger right there.

I have noticed that many things poisonous have the color red/orange on them somewhere. Is this nature's way of making them stand out so we can see them? 
Of course, there are many things that don't have bright colors too, like certain snakes and scorpions, etc.

I often wonder what The Creator was thinking when He/She made these creatures? Especially yellow jackets! What purpose do they serve except to scare the poop out of people and make them sick, or possibly die?
Nature's way of thinning the population?

Okay, I'm rambling.  I'll stop now.

You know, when Grace and I were moving back here from Kansas City, I told her we were moving to a rain forest. On the way, when we were in Eastern Kentucky (and it was in July), the deep blue-green of the trees, the canopy cover on the mountains, and the mist rising through the trees nearly convinced her.

That first winter argued against it.

However, in either the first or second month in this house, I ran into one of the centipedes. I normally keep my clothes in a chair near the bed so I can jump up and jump into them with little or no notice. I was going in to work at 7 am at the time, so it was early morning when I got up. Started to put my clothes on, and one of the little bastards fell out of my clothes onto the floor. It died a horrendous death, but I could feel centipedes crawling all over my body the rest of that day.

It wasn't a big one, only about 3 or 4 inches long or so and looked just like the one in the photo (but smaller), but what creeped me out was that it was in the house, and got hid in my clothes, and had to climb a chair leg to do that. It was like the little bugger was aiming for me. Made my skin crawl all day. I started banging my boots out like I did back in the day after that. Creepy crawlies (spiders, centipedes, scorpions, snakes, etc.) in the jungle just LOVE to hide out in your boots, and wait for you to put them on unawares.

I pound them boots on the floor and then shake them out to this very day. Probably will the rest of my life. That first year I killed 21 spiders by shaking those boots out.

All kinds of spiders here. We have a big "Huntsman spider" that is about 6 inches or so across the legs. I call them "saber-tooth spiders" because their fangs are near a quarter inch long. My sister calls them "tarantulas", but they aren't - they not nearly as stocky as tarantulas are. I've killed about 5 of them in this house. Now, one might think those are pretty creepy, but let me tell you a story...

I went out to the laundry room one day, and there in the floor was one of those big-assed huntsman spiders. The thing is, it was laid over on it's back, with it's legs all curled up and meeting just above it's belly. Upon closer inspection, I saw that it's feet were TIED TOGETHER with spider silk. The big bastard had been hog-tied by some OTHER spider!

Nowadays, the big ass Huntsman spiders don't creep me out nearly as much as whatever spider did that to that one!

Then there are the "jumping spiders" or "dancing spiders". I don't know what they are really called, but they're mean little bastards. they attack without provocation. They're not like the little tiny black jumping spiders that are really called "Jumping spiders" - they run across the ground dancing - they kind of roll like a wobbly top when they run... and they like as not will be running straight for you. They're anywhere from an inch and a half to 3 inches across the legs. I've had them jump as high as my knees and straight AT me, maybe 2 or 3 feet forward towards me, and they only missed because I could jump or scoot backwards just as fast. They, too, die horrible, horrible deaths whenever I see one. Had one crawl up the back of my chair one evening. Grace at first thought it was the cat climbing my chair, but when she realized what it was she shrieked and pointed, and just that quick I was 5 feet away and facing the chair, with that blasted spider perched on the top of the back of it, wondering how in the hell I did that... and that was the last thought it had.

Got black widows around here, and at work, too. We killed 9 in the space of a 15 minute break one day up there, as the rain ran them out of their hidey-holes. I killed one one day that was dangling from the roof on a thread of silk, aiming for a young lady that stood there unawares. I saw it, walked up to her and tapped her on the shoulder, and said "'scuse me miss - could you step 3 feet thataway?" when she did, I grabbed it's silk string, lowered it to the ground, and lowered the boom on it. A crowd of folks around there generally took the opinion that I was crazy, playing with black widows like that, but hell, no one got bit by it, and all was well, right?

Then there are the millipedes here. Great big ones. They aren't dangerous, but they're still pretty creepy. Got too many legs, y'know? I was walking back home from my sister's house a couple hundred yards up the road one summer day, and saw something in the road which I thought was a baby snake... until I got up to it. It was one of those millipedes, the biggest one I ever saw here, that had been crossing the road when a car decided it's fate. It was about 8 or 10 inches long, but the car won that fight anyhow. I took pictures of it, because I was pretty sure that if I didn't, I'd convince myself that I was just hallucinating it a couple years down the road.

Not everything here is dangerous, though. Sure, we've got copperheads, rattle snakes, and water moccasins, but everyone around here claims every snake they see is a "copperhead". The vast majority are not. We had an infestation at work, where snakes were getting in all over the building, and every one they saw was a "copperhead". A guy caught one under my trash can one day when I was off work. It bit him as he was catching it, but he never swelled or nothing. it was just a regular snake. Another one came in through a crack in the concrete floor, but got away when a guy tried to kill it, causing me and another manager to have to spend a whole day de-snaking the place. That one wasn't really a copperhead, either. A guy killed one in the ladies bathroom and threw it out. He swore it was a copperhead, but I made him show me where it was, and it was just a corn snake. I killed one in the lobby that folks swore was a copperhead, but it was just a corn snake, too. I had to kill it to set them back at ease.

For some odd reason, the state has declared it illegal to kill rattlesnakes in this county. They can kiss my ass - I'll kill every one I can find. I reckon if I don't mention it to the state, then it must have never happened. I.E. - it ain't illegal if ya don't get caught.

Years ago, I had a friend that I spent a lot of time in the brush and  tall grass with. He's dead now, died years ago, but something he always said stuck in my mind, and will likely be there till the end of my days. He was fond of saying "in the end, the wild will win". The older I get, and the more this place changes back to wilderness and creepy critters, the more I am convinced he was right.

P.S. - Yellowjackets. Yellowjackets are a variety of hornet, and all hornets are just assholes with wings.

P.P.S. - I reckon we come by creepy crawlies honest around here. 315 million years ago, when this whole area was a coal swamp 5 degrees off the equator, there was a centipede that lived here called "Arthropleura". It was 8 feet long. Thank God there aren't any of those left...

There AREN'T any of those left, right? RIGHT?

.

Explanation: Its a shame that there probably aren't any more left in the wild after 315 million years.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthropleura






Personal Disclosure: Because both you and I know mate, that something that big can be WRANGLED, ROPED, BROKEN IN, TAMED and RIDDEN like the yuge worms in the Dune movies/books/etc.











But back on topic ... I live in Australia where the smallest red back spider can kill you [along with everything else in the bush .. yaddah yaddah, yes its big bad ol' Australia for yahs] at least the centipede in the OP is big enough to be seen clearly as long as you shake any dropped clothes and make sure to tap out your boots before putting them on. I'm only a suburbanite but my parents who are country folk originally did teach me such safety precautions generally and especially when out camping in the wilds.

As for killing bugs ...





I have had my fair share of doing that and I am not unaccustomed to it.

Shame that I am not a Jain.

minusculebeercheers
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#10
(04-30-2019, 08:47 AM)Ninurta Wrote:
(04-29-2019, 03:03 PM)Mystic Wanderer Wrote: Be careful 727Sky. 

We have poisonous centipedes here too, but they don't look like that.
That is an ugly bugger right there.

I have noticed that many things poisonous have the color red/orange on them somewhere. Is this nature's way of making them stand out so we can see them? 
Of course, there are many things that don't have bright colors too, like certain snakes and scorpions, etc.

I often wonder what The Creator was thinking when He/She made these creatures? Especially yellow jackets! What purpose do they serve except to scare the poop out of people and make them sick, or possibly die?
Nature's way of thinning the population?

Okay, I'm rambling.  I'll stop now.

You know, when Grace and I were moving back here from Kansas City, I told her we were moving to a rain forest. On the way, when we were in Eastern Kentucky (and it was in July), the deep blue-green of the trees, the canopy cover on the mountains, and the mist rising through the trees nearly convinced her.

That first winter argued against it.

However, in either the first or second month in this house, I ran into one of the centipedes. I normally keep my clothes in a chair near the bed so I can jump up and jump into them with little or no notice. I was going in to work at 7 am at the time, so it was early morning when I got up. Started to put my clothes on, and one of the little bastards fell out of my clothes onto the floor. It died a horrendous death, but I could feel centipedes crawling all over my body the rest of that day.

It wasn't a big one, only about 3 or 4 inches long or so and looked just like the one in the photo (but smaller), but what creeped me out was that it was in the house, and got hid in my clothes, and had to climb a chair leg to do that. It was like the little bugger was aiming for me. Made my skin crawl all day. I started banging my boots out like I did back in the day after that. Creepy crawlies (spiders, centipedes, scorpions, snakes, etc.) in the jungle just LOVE to hide out in your boots, and wait for you to put them on unawares.

I pound them boots on the floor and then shake them out to this very day. Probably will the rest of my life. That first year I killed 21 spiders by shaking those boots out.

All kinds of spiders here. We have a big "Huntsman spider" that is about 6 inches or so across the legs. I call them "saber-tooth spiders" because their fangs are near a quarter inch long. My sister calls them "tarantulas", but they aren't - they not nearly as stocky as tarantulas are. I've killed about 5 of them in this house. Now, one might think those are pretty creepy, but let me tell you a story...

I went out to the laundry room one day, and there in the floor was one of those big-assed huntsman spiders. The thing is, it was laid over on it's back, with it's legs all curled up and meeting just above it's belly. Upon closer inspection, I saw that it's feet were TIED TOGETHER with spider silk. The big bastard had been hog-tied by some OTHER spider!

Nowadays, the big ass Huntsman spiders don't creep me out nearly as much as whatever spider did that to that one!

Then there are the "jumping spiders" or "dancing spiders". I don't know what they are really called, but they're mean little bastards. they attack without provocation. They're not like the little tiny black jumping spiders that are really called "Jumping spiders" - they run across the ground dancing - they kind of roll like a wobbly top when they run... and they like as not will be running straight for you. They're anywhere from an inch and a half to 3 inches across the legs. I've had them jump as high as my knees and straight AT me, maybe 2 or 3 feet forward towards me, and they only missed because I could jump or scoot backwards just as fast. They, too, die horrible, horrible deaths whenever I see one. Had one crawl up the back of my chair one evening. Grace at first thought it was the cat climbing my chair, but when she realized what it was she shrieked and pointed, and just that quick I was 5 feet away and facing the chair, with that blasted spider perched on the top of the back of it, wondering how in the hell I did that... and that was the last thought it had.

Got black widows around here, and at work, too. We killed 9 in the space of a 15 minute break one day up there, as the rain ran them out of their hidey-holes. I killed one one day that was dangling from the roof on a thread of silk, aiming for a young lady that stood there unawares. I saw it, walked up to her and tapped her on the shoulder, and said "'scuse me miss - could you step 3 feet thataway?" when she did, I grabbed it's silk string, lowered it to the ground, and lowered the boom on it. A crowd of folks around there generally took the opinion that I was crazy, playing with black widows like that, but hell, no one got bit by it, and all was well, right?

Then there are the millipedes here. Great big ones. They aren't dangerous, but they're still pretty creepy. Got too many legs, y'know? I was walking back home from my sister's house a couple hundred yards up the road one summer day, and saw something in the road which I thought was a baby snake... until I got up to it. It was one of those millipedes, the biggest one I ever saw here, that had been crossing the road when a car decided it's fate. It was about 8 or 10 inches long, but the car won that fight anyhow. I took pictures of it, because I was pretty sure that if I didn't, I'd convince myself that I was just hallucinating it a couple years down the road.

Not everything here is dangerous, though. Sure, we've got copperheads, rattle snakes, and water moccasins, but everyone around here claims every snake they see is a "copperhead". The vast majority are not. We had an infestation at work, where snakes were getting in all over the building, and every one they saw was a "copperhead". A guy caught one under my trash can one day when I was off work. It bit him as he was catching it, but he never swelled or nothing. it was just a regular snake. Another one came in through a crack in the concrete floor, but got away when a guy tried to kill it, causing me and another manager to have to spend a whole day de-snaking the place. That one wasn't really a copperhead, either. A guy killed one in the ladies bathroom and threw it out. He swore it was a copperhead, but I made him show me where it was, and it was just a corn snake. I killed one in the lobby that folks swore was a copperhead, but it was just a corn snake, too. I had to kill it to set them back at ease.

For some odd reason, the state has declared it illegal to kill rattlesnakes in this county. They can kiss my ass - I'll kill every one I can find. I reckon if I don't mention it to the state, then it must have never happened. I.E. - it ain't illegal if ya don't get caught.

Years ago, I had a friend that I spent a lot of time in the brush and  tall grass with. He's dead now, died years ago, but something he always said stuck in my mind, and will likely be there till the end of my days. He was fond of saying "in the end, the wild will win". The older I get, and the more this place changes back to wilderness and creepy critters, the more I am convinced he was right.

P.S. - Yellowjackets. Yellowjackets are a variety of hornet, and all hornets are just assholes with wings.

P.P.S. - I reckon we come by creepy crawlies honest around here. 315 million years ago, when this whole area was a coal swamp 5 degrees off the equator, there was a centipede that lived here called "Arthropleura". It was 8 feet long. Thank God there aren't any of those left...

There AREN'T any of those left, right? RIGHT?

.
Both of the ones I have killed were in the house and on a tile floor. One was around 9 inches and the other a little over 6. Not all that unexpected as I kinda live in a jungle surrounding... Two snakes in the house but I did a catch and release on them.. sounds daring, no? hahah not really.... just another year in paradise..
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#11
If I remember right in "The Wrath of Khan" ( Star Trek, not the London one ) they had they had bugs that crawl into your ear and take control of your brain.
Then again maybe the London one has these as well  minusculebiggrin
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