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Earth is eating its own oceans
#1
Quote:The Earth is eating its own oceans
minusculewtf  Is This About!!!??? I'm waiting for Al Gore to make a Statement that Climate Change is Causing EarthQuakes and Volcanoes and that it is our Fault The Oceans are Slipping beneath the Tectonic Plates!!

Quote:As Earth's tectonic plates dive beneath one another, they drag three times as much water into the planet's interior as previously thought.

Those are the results of a new paper published today (Nov. 14) in the journal Nature. Using the natural seismic rumblings of the earthquake-prone subduction zone at the Marianastrench, where the Pacific plate is sliding beneath the Philippine plate, researchers were able to estimate how much water gets incorporated into the rocks that dive deep below the surface. [In Photos: Ocean Hidden Beneath Earth's Surface]
Ok,, let me get this straight in my head,,,,,as the plates slip below the other plate it drags or absorbs ocean water with it.  tinybighuh
Is there Room? Is there as space there for water to seep through? Is there a suction type action?
No.
Their answer it this.


Quote:Water is stored in the crystalline structure of minerals, Shillington wrote. The liquid gets incorporated into the Earth's crust both when brand-new, piping-hot oceanic plates form and when the same plates bend and crack as they grind under their neighbors. This latter process, called subduction, is the only way water penetrates deep into the crust and mantle, but little is known about how much water moves during the process, study leader Chen Cai of Washington University in St. Louis and his colleagues wrote in their new paper.

"Before we did this study, every researcher knew that water must be carried down by the subducting slab," Cai told Live Science. "But they just didn't know how much water."

The researchers used data picked up by a network of seismic sensors positioned around the central Marianas Trench in the western Pacific Ocean.
The deepest part of the trench is nearly 7 miles (11 kilometers) below sea level. The sensors detect earthquakes and the echoes of earthquakes ringing through Earth's crust like a bell.

Cai and his team tracked how fast those temblors traveled: A slowdown in velocity, he said, would indicate water-filled fractures in rocks and "hydrated" minerals that lock up water within their crystals.
 Ok, So just how much water do you think goes under our feet? smalleyeroll 
Quote:The researchers observed such slowdowns deep into the crust, some 18 miles (30 km) below the surface, Cai said.
Using the measured velocities, along with the known temperatures and pressures found there, the team calculated that the subduction zones pull 3 billion teragrams of water into the crust every million years (a teragram is a billion kilograms).
Three Billion WHAT!?  tinywhat
Is Al Gore going to start announcing we are Draining our Oceans????
Oh, a they are talking about kilograms, that's not so bad is it? minusculethinking

Quote:Seawater is heavy; a cube of this water 1 meter (3.3 feet) long on each side would weigh 1,024 kilograms (2,250 lbs.).
But still, the amount pulled down by subduction zones is mind-boggling.
It's also three times as much water as subduction zones were previously estimated to take in, Cai said.
Holy-Shit Batman,,,, minusculespooked That is a Lot Of Water!!!!!!
Where is it all going? Does it come back? 

Quote:And that raises some questions: The water that goes down must come up, usually in the contents of volcanic eruptions.

The new estimate of how much water is going down is larger than estimates of how much is being emitted by volcanos, meaning scientists are missing something in their estimates, the researchers said.
There is no missing water in the oceans, Cai said.
That means the amount of water dragged down into the crust and the amount spouted back out should be about equal.

The fact that they aren't suggests that there's something about how water moves through the interior of Earth that scientists don't yet understand.
Source
OK, there is No Missing Water in our Oceans,,,,, That means Old Al Gore Can Just Go Set Down and Play With Himself.
Unless of-course he wants to say that the missing water is replaced by our melting Ice Caps.  smalltappingfoot

So, what do you think?
Once A Rogue, Always A Rogue!
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#2
There's a complex and scientific name for it.

Nature.
tinybiggrin
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#3
The level of the oceans isn't changing because all of the Billions of Billions of Kilograms of water is being replaced with an exactly equal amount of plastic waste.
Do your bit for the ocean - use non-recyclable plastic and dump it in a river or beach today!
tinybighuh Being Rogue is WEIRD, But I LIKE IT!tinyfunny 
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#4
Quote:(Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan and Germany has found evidence that suggests the middle of Earth's mantle holds as much water as the planet's oceans. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their theory and their experiments to try to prove them correct.

Scientists are convinced that the uppermost part of the mantle and lower part closest to the core are relatively water free. This is because the materials they are made of can't to store water very well. The layer in between (at 410 to 660 kilometers below the surface), however, has been a topic of debate, with some believing it is also nearly water free and others suggesting it could harbor massive amounts of water. This is because the mid-mantle is dominated by the minerals wadsleyite and ringwoodite, which are known to be able to hold a lot of water. In this new effort, the researchers sought to settle the debate by using logic and lab experiments.
The team notes that prior research has shown that the viscosity of the middle zone of the mantle is lower than that of both the upper mantle and lower mantle. To figure out if the middle zone is holding water, the researchers used this information and conducted lab experiments meant to replicate such conditions. They created synthetic ringwoodite to represent the middle mantle and bridgmanite to represent material from the lower mantle. They then used a technique that involved measuring dislocation mobility to infer viscosity and then added water to the ringwoodite. They report that doing so reduced its viscosity and matched measurements taken of the real mantle—this suggests that the real-world middle mantle does, indeed, hold water. By adjusting the amount of water added to their synthetic mantle and calculating changes in viscosity, they were able to estimate how waterlogged the real-world minerals are. They then used that information to calculate how much water is in the entire mid-mantle. They report that it is very nearly equal to the amount of water in all of the world's oceans.
More testing will have to be done, of course, but if scientists can prove without doubt that the middle mantle is filled with water, it calls into question theories that suggest water arrived on Earth from comets.
[Image: 1x1.gif] Explore further: Scientists discover why rocks flow slowly in Earth's middle mantle
More information: A nearly water-saturated mantle transition zone inferred from mineral viscosity, Science Advances  07 Jun 2017: Vol. 3, no. 6, e1603024, DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1603024 , http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/3...03024.full
Abstract
An open question for solid-earth scientists is the amount of water in Earth's interior. The uppermost mantle and lower mantle contain little water because their dominant minerals, olivine and bridgmanite, have limited water storage capacity. In contrast, the mantle transition zone (MTZ) at a depth of 410 to 660 km is considered to be a potential water reservoir because its dominant minerals, wadsleyite and ringwoodite, can contain large amounts of water [up to 3 weight % (wt %)]. However, the actual amount of water in the MTZ is unknown. Given that water incorporated into mantle minerals can lower their viscosity, we evaluate the water content of the MTZ by measuring dislocation mobility, a property that is inversely proportional to viscosity, as a function of temperature and water content in ringwoodite and bridgmanite. We find that dislocation mobility in bridgmanite is faster by two orders of magnitude than in anhydrous ringwoodite but 1.5 orders of magnitude slower than in water-saturated ringwoodite. To fit the observed mantle viscosity profiles, ringwoodite in the MTZ should contain 1 to 2 wt % water. The MTZ should thus be nearly water-saturated globally.


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-06-mid-mantle...s.html#jCp
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#5
Explanation: @guohua ...

Quote:Ok, So just how much water do you think goes under our feet? [Image: Smalleyeroll.png]

Quote: Wrote:The researchers observed such slowdowns deep into the crust, some 18 miles (30 km) below the surface, Cai said.
 Using the measured velocities, along with the known temperatures and pressures found there, the team calculated that the subduction zones pull 3 billion teragrams of water into the crust every million years (a teragram is a billion kilograms).
Three Billion WHAT!?  [Image: tinywhat.png]
Is Al Gore going to start announcing we are Draining our Oceans????
Oh, a they are talking about kilograms, that's not so bad is it? [Image: Minusculethinking.gif]

Quote: Wrote:Seawater is heavy; a cube of this water 1 meter (3.3 feet) long on each side would weigh 1,024 kilograms (2,250 lbs.).
 But still, the amount pulled down by subduction zones is mind-boggling.
 It's also three times as much water as subduction zones were previously estimated to take in, Cai said.
Holy-Shit Batman,,,, [Image: MinusculeSpooked.gif] That is a Lot Of Water!!!!!!

I did some maths and physics and came up with the following ...

[Image: Tectonic_plate_boundaries.png]

3,000,000,000 teragrams = 3 x 100km^3

1,000,000,000 teragrams = 100km^3

1,000,000 teragrams = 10km^3

1,000 teragrams = 1km^3 (1000m^3 of water = 1 billion tons of water = 1000 teragrams)

100m^3 of water = 1 million tons of water = 1 billion grams = 1 teragram

10m^3 of water = 1,000 tons of water = 1/100th of 1 teragram

1m^3 of water = 1 ton of water = 1/10,000th of 1 teragram

10cm^3 = 1000 grams (1 kilogram , 1 liter, 1000 mls)

1cm^3 = 1 grams (1milliliter)

1mm^3 = 1 microgram (1micromilliliter)

Therefor ...

3,155,760,000 teragrams / 1,000,000 yrs / 365.25 days / 24 hrs / 60 mins / 60 seconds = 3,155,760 teragrams / year = 8.64 teragrams / day
 
= 0.36 teragrams / hr = 0.006 teragrams / min = 0.0001 teragrams / sec
 
1,000,000 tons x 0.0001 teragrams = 100 tons
 
10^2 x 1m^3 = 100 tons of water per second is subducted [eaten] by the earth / along a 50,000+km long subduction zone [total] = 2 kilograms (2 liters) / km  =

= 2 grams  / meter  = 20 micrograms (20 micromilliters) / mm / sec .
 
Imagine a trench 50,000+km long and about 1mm wide and 660km deep, right along where the continental/ oceanic slab is subducting, and that 1mm wide gap
 
allows a 2cm (20mm) tall 1mm^2 thin tower of water to soak/sink/seap/subduct into it per second, for every 1 mm along its entire length, nonstop for 1 million years ...
 
that adds up to 3,000,000,000+ teragrams = 3.? x 100km^3
 
If we take that the ocean is 5km deep on average and that requires {20 x 5km slices of ocean} then 1 slice = 100km x 100km^2 = 100km^3 x 3.? = 60 x 5km
 
slices of the ocean each 100km^2 in area = 800km^2 x 5km deep [64 x 100km^2 slices in 8 x 8 grid] and that takes up this much of the ocean ...
 
[Image: eartheatsthismuchoceaneverymillionyears.png]
 
Here is a map of subduction zones world wide ...
 
[Image: Earthquake-Prediction-Map-australian-geographic.jpg]
 
Here is where I got my information on how long the subduction zones are ...
 
Mapping giant earthquake potential (australiangeographic.com.au)
 
Quote:There are 23 active subduction zones around the world. The total length of all subduction zones on Earth is about 50,000km and only about 10 per cent of this total length has produced giant earthquakes in the past 100 years,
 
Here is where I got my guestimate for how deep the ocean is ...
 
Ocean Depth (oceanservice.noaa.gov)
 
I used MSCalculator in scientific mode to do all my calculations.
 
Personal Disclosure: Firstly some music to go with ...
 



 
I hope my maths and my data sources help put this into some kinda of back of the envelope and inside the ball park dimensions.
 
Firstly 1 million years is a very long time and 2ndly 50,000km of subduction zone x 1mm wide is a big area = 225m^2 x 660km deep [aka thats a VERY BIG HOLE in total]
 
Little things add up quickly over long ranges of space and time and I can easily see these figures as being close to accurate!
 
HOWEVER I suck at maths and can be ORDERS of MAGNITUDE out ... so please don't rely on the above maths to do anything with unless you double check my
 
results yourself first.
 
And yet in comparison the 800km^2 x 5km deep ocean patch that is eaten by the earth every million years seems to pale into insignificance when faced with the

great pacific ocean and or even all the rest of the oceans together!!!

How much water on earth? [livescience.com]


Quote:If Earth was the size of a basketball, all of its water would fit into a ping pong ball.

How much water is that? It's roughly 326 million cubic miles (1.332 billion cubic kilometers), according to a recent study from the U.S. Geological Survey.

So 3,200,000 cubic kilometers [800 km x 800 km x 5 km] versus 1,332,000,000 cubic kilometers [16,300 km x 16,300km x 5km] = 0.25% (1/400th)

of the total of earths water is subducted over 1 million years.

It is amazing what a 50,000+km long 2cm tall 1mm thick ribbon of water adds up to [100tons] and to think that we are 'losing' that into the

inner earth every second is quite profound and amazing!

minusculebeercheers
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#6
The maths in this is so far outside my comfort zone, I think I will just sit in the corner and suck my thumb   tinybighuh
WAR IS PEACE, FREEDOM IS SLAVERY, IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH, THE EU IS FATHER AND MOTHER
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#7
@OmegaLogos 
That Math made my Head Hurt  smalltappinghead WOW   minusculespooked

I've talk to people who have homes so close to the Ocean they can walk to it,
They say the Oceans are not receding or rising.
It looks the same level it did 20 years ago, they are not losing or gaining beach front property. 

But then I have read about this occurrence of bubbling mud in California on or near the San Andreas Fault line.

Quote:A Gurgling ‘Mud Pot’ Is Crawling Across Southern California

Scientists don’t know why the muddy spring is moving, but it poses a threat to the infrastructure in its path.
[Image: yellowstone_mud_pot_p1090998.jpg]

Quote:At the southern end of the San Andreas Fault in California, where the North American and Pacific tectonic plates famously touch, sits a stinky, gurgling pool of mud. Scientists have been aware of this “mud pot,” as the geothermal feature is known, since the 1950s. But it has recently become a cause for concern because, as Robin George Andrews reports for National Geographic, the mud pot is on the move.

Called the “Niland Geyser” because it is located near the township of Niland in Imperial County, the mud pot began its sludgy trudge at some point between 2015 and 2016. The bubbling pool has since moved about 20 feet each year, carving a 24,000 square foot basin in the ground. Its pace is not particularly quick, but officials are nevertheless worried about what lies in its path.
According to Alejandra Reyes-Velarde and Rong-Gong Lin II of the Las Angeles Times, the mud is creeping in the direction of Union Pacific freight railroad tracks, a petroleum pipeline, fiber optic telecommunications lines owned by Verizon, and part of Highway 111, which connects the Coachella Valley to California’s border with Mexico. To date, attempts to stop the mud pot’s forward march have not been successful. Union Pacific tried to build a 100-foot wall that extended 75 feet into the ground to stop the mud from reaching its railroads. The mud simply oozed beneath the wall.

Source

Does the action of the San Andreas Fault drawing water from the Pacific Ocean have anything to do with this?  minusculethinking
Can the Scientific Community put Two and Two together here? 
Or maybe it has nothing to do with Ocean Water At All.
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