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Roundup ingredient found in foods. Know what you eat!
#1
Well, they are trying to kill us off for sure.  They are putting glyphosate in three foods that children eat quite often, or at least they did when I was growing up. 
Between the targeted children's poisoned food, the brainwashing on children to change their gender, and child abductions, I'm surprised we have any future generations left.   tinyshocked 

[Image: ROUNDUP_1280x720_00000_1534371892999_593...40_360.jpg]

Quote:FOX BUSINESS - Days after a California jury awarded a school groundskeeper more than $289 million in damages after he claimed Monsanto’s best-selling weedkiller Roundup gave him cancer, the controversial ingredient – glyphosate — has been detected in popular kids’ breakfast cereals, including Cheerios, Lucky Charms and Quaker Old Fashioned Oats, according to an activist group.

Lab tests conducted by the left-leaning Environmental Working Group (EWG), a nonprofit advocacy group that specializes in toxic chemicals and corporate accountability, indicated almost three-fourths of the 45 food products tested detected high levels of glyphosate, which has been identified as a “probable carcinogen” by the World Health Organization in 2015.
But makers of the foods EWG tested said they and their suppliers operate within U.S. government safety guidelines and dismissed the group's findings as irrelevant.

However, many EWG scientists consider levels higher than 160 parts per billion of glyphosate above the safety threshold for children.
What’s more, about one-third of the 16 samples made with organically grown oats also had glyphosate, but at levels below EWG’s benchmark.

Popular children items, including General Mills’ Cheerios Toasted Whole Grain Oat Cereal, Lucky Charm’s, Kellogg’s Cracklin’ Oat Bran and Quaker’s Old Fashioned Oats, all had levels exceeding EWG’s safety guidelines.

But while those products exceeded the EWG’s threshold, they still fall within the EPA’s regulations, many food brands said.
In a statement to FOX Business regarding the report, a General Mills’ spokesperson says, “Our products are safe and without questions they meet regulatory safety levels.”

“The EPA has researched this issue and has set rules that we follow as do farmers who grow crops including wheat and oats.  We continue to work closely with farmers, our suppliers and conservation organizations to minimize the use of pesticides on the crops and ingredients we use in our foods,” General Mills added.

Quaker also released a statement following the report, saying it does not add glyphosate during any part of the milling process,” and “glyphosate is commonly used by farmers across the industry who apply it pre-harvest.” Kellogg’s issued a similar statement, saying its food is safe and they follow the EPA’s strict standards for safely levels of these agricultural residues “and the ingredients we purchase from suppliers for our foods fall under these limits.”

Dewayne “Lee” Johnson just won his court case against Monsanto for causing his cancer and was awarded $289 million in damages.
This should be a warning to Bayer, who now owns Monsanto, to take glyphosate out of food. They may say it is at "safe levels", but they also said it didn't cause cancer PERIOD when Round up first came on the market.


Quote:The report come days after a jury at the Superior Court of California awarded $289 million in damages to Dewayne “Lee” Johnson, a San Francisco school groundskeeper that claimed Roundup caused him to developed non-Hodgkin lymphoma after using the spray for more than two years.

Jurors concluded that Monsanto’s Roundup and Ranger Pro products did present a “substantial danger” to Johnson and that the company, which is now owned by Bayer, knew or should have known about the potential risks of the products posed.

Johnson’s case is the first of a long list of about 4,000 people looking to sue the weed-and-seed maker for similar allegations.
Monsanto, however, says it plans to appeal the court’s decision and the verdict “does not change the fact that more than 800 scientific studies and reviews – and conclusions by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. National Institutes of Health and regulatory authorities around the world – support the fact that glyphosate does not cause cancer, and did not cause Mr. Johnson’s cancer.”
Read more/Source


I've read reports and seen people speak about how the FDA and EPA pay off people to report in favor of their company, so of course they are going to say it doesn't cause cancer; they lie just like everyone else in government. 

Who do you believe?  Ready to gamble with your life?



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#2
Well before round up we had this.
Quote:Experiments performed in the United States[edit]
See also: Unethical human experimentation in the United States § Human radiation experiments
Numerous human radiation experiments have been performed in the United States, many of which were funded by various U.S. government agencies[3] such as the United States Department of Defense, the United States Atomic Energy Commission, and the United States Public Health Service. Experiments including:
  • feeding radioactive material to mentally disabled children[4]

  • enlisting doctors to administer radioactive iron to impoverished pregnant women

  • exposing U.S. soldiers and prisoners to high levels of radiation[4]

  • irradiating the testicles of prisoners, which caused severe birth defects[4]

  • exhuming bodies from graveyards to test them for radiation (without the consent of the families of the deceased)[5]
On January 15, 1994, President Bill Clinton formed the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE), chaired by Ruth Faden, Ph.D., MPH[6][7] of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. One of the primary motivating factors behind his decision to create ACHRE was action taken by his newly appointed Secretary of Energy, Hazel O’Leary, J.D. One of her first actions on taking the reins of the Department of Energy was to announce a new openness policy for the Department. The policy led almost immediately to the release of over 1.6 million pages of classified records. The records made clear that since the 1940s the Atomic Energy Commission had been sponsoring tests on the effects of radiation on the human body. American citizens who had checked into hospitals for a variety of ailments were secretly injected with varying amounts of plutonium and other radioactive materials without their knowledge. Ebb Cade was an unwilling participant in medical experiments that involved injection of 4.7 micrograms of Plutonium on 10 April 1945 at Oak Ridge, Tennessee.[8][9] This experiment was under the supervision of Harold Hodge.[10] Most patients thought it was "just another injection," but the secret studies left enough radioactive material in many of the patients' bodies to induce life-threatening conditions. Such experiments were not limited to hospital patients, but included other populations such as those set out above, e.g., orphans fed irradiated milk, children injected with radioactive materials, prisoners in Washington and Oregon state prisons. Much of the experimentation was carried out in order to assess how the human body metabolizes radioactive materials, information that could be used by the Departments of Energy and Defense in Cold War defense/attack planning.
ACHRE's final report was also a factor in the Department of Energy establishing an Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE) that assured publication of DOE’s involvement (by way of its predecessor, the AEC) in Cold War radiation research and experimentation on human subjects. The final report issued by the ACHRE can be found at the Department of Energy's website.
Soviet Union[edit]
The Soviet nuclear program involved human experiments on a large scale, including most notably the Totskoye nuclear exercise of 1954 and the experiments conducted at the Semipalatinsk Test Site (1949-1989). As of 1950, there were around 700,000 participants at different levels of the program, half of whom were Gulag prisoners used for radioactivity experiments, as well as the excavation of radioactive ores. Information about the scale, conditions and lethality of those involved in the program is still kept secret by the Russian government and the Rosatom agency.[11][12]
Other countries[edit]
In the Marshall Islands, indigenous residents and crewmembers of the fishing boat Lucky Dragon No. 5 were exposed to the high yields of radioactive testing during the Castle Bravo explosions conducted at Bikini Atoll. Researchers subsequently exploited this ostensibly unexpected turn of events by conducting research on the onset of effects from radiation poisoning as part of Project 4.1, raising ethical questions as to both the specific incident and the broader phenomenon of testing in populated areas.[13]
Likewise, the Venezuelan geneticist Marcel Roche was implicated in Patrick Tierney's 2000 publication, Darkness in El Dorado, for allegedly administering radioactive iodine to indigenous peoples in the Orinoco basin of Venezuela, such as the Yanomami and Ye'Kwanapeoples, in cooperation with the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), possibly with no apparent benefit for the test group and without obtaining proper informed consent. This corresponded to similar administrations of iodine-124 by the French anthropologist Jacques Lizot in cooperation with the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA).[14][15]

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#3
@Wallfire, your post makes mine look pale in comparison. 

Sigh... I have no words for these people; beyond evil.  It's one thing to use people if you have their permission, but totally evil if you don't. 

SMH...   tinyhuh



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#4
The horrible things they did to the poor people in the 60s should never be forgiven ( and its sad so few people know about it), but it was not done for money, it was done to try to understand what would happen to humans if WW3 started, and how to save human kind.
Every one should remember that this was an exsample of "the end justifies the means", and " the needs of the many outweighs the needs of the few".
Now as shown in MWs post we have the "need of the few" to make lots of money "outweighs the needs of the many "
To knowingly poison millions of people for no other reason than to make money for me is even worse than what was done in the 50s-60s.
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