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Current Electric Cars
#21
(08-15-2018, 10:59 PM)guohua Wrote: ...Here is a picture from the bedroom area of a 2009 386 Peterbilt.
Ours didn't have the extra bunk bed for a second driver, we had one full size bed, Refrigerator
and microwave and small closet space with storage under the bed and above. 

Great Scott! A veritable home-from-home!

When I was in my teens, I used to travel the UK with my friend in his little Mercedes flat-back truck.
It had no sleeping compartment -unless you count the seats and the floor!
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#22
(08-15-2018, 08:30 PM)guohua Wrote: @Wallfire 
My husband said it was the  Eaton Fuller 10 speed transmission.
He really liked it, in Texas, Nevada and Kansas late at night (03:00 am) he could be in high 10 and cruise at 85 MPH with a fully loaded 53 ft trailer. (No Speed Governor) on the Cummins, He thinks it was the Cummins ISX15 engine, Peterbilt did all our maintenance because of their Great Warranty on their tractor.
On the interstates and freeways he could shift on the fly (in his words) and not grind a gear.

We miss our truck, but the cost of the different licenses to haul all products and insurance and registration and the diesel prices was just to much to make good money. Fill up two 103 gallon tanks and travel 1000 or so miles is not good at $2.85 a gallon (price at the time roughly).

I once did a 4 day trip across Sweden in a lorry with a fuller gear box ( did the trip for a friend who wanted time with his wife,since I was on holidays from my teaching job I said ok ) Any way I know that all fuller gear boxes are made in hell, but this gear box was not only made in hell but made to Satan's own special specifications.

NEVER AGAIN
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#23
(08-16-2018, 03:01 PM)Wallfire Wrote:
(08-15-2018, 08:30 PM)guohua Wrote: @Wallfire 
My husband said it was the  Eaton Fuller 10 speed transmission.
He really liked it, in Texas, Nevada and Kansas late at night (03:00 am) he could be in high 10 and cruise at 85 MPH with a fully loaded 53 ft trailer. (No Speed Governor) on the Cummins, He thinks it was the Cummins ISX15 engine, Peterbilt did all our maintenance because of their Great Warranty on their tractor.
On the interstates and freeways he could shift on the fly (in his words) and not grind a gear.

We miss our truck, but the cost of the different licenses to haul all products and insurance and registration and the diesel prices was just to much to make good money. Fill up two 103 gallon tanks and travel 1000 or so miles is not good at $2.85 a gallon (price at the time roughly).

I once did a 4 day trip across Sweden in a lorry with a fuller gear box ( did the trip for a friend who wanted time with his wife,since I was on holidays from my teaching job I said ok ) Any way I know that all fuller gear boxes are made in hell, but this gear box was not only made in hell but made to Satan's own special specifications.

NEVER AGAIN
Hi, Fellow Professional Driver @Wallfire  Mr. G. here.

The trick to a Fuller, is Never, Ever Depress the Clutch over half way down or all the way to the floor board,
I was shown by an old driver at a truck stop in Flagstaff, Az. called, Little America Truck Stop my first or second day with my new truck.
He heard my complaining to my wife about shifting and he came over and explained to me that you only Depress The Clutch Pedal when you are in the Proper RPM Range and then only about 1/4 or Two Inches down and shift before your RPM's drop to much. If your drop the clutch to the floor board then your RPM's have time to drop and you'll have trouble getting in the gear.

I found this to work GREAT! As a matter of fact I'd run the RPM's up just a little over and shift just as I removed my foot from the Throttle Pedal With Out The Clutch!
The only time I ever really had to use the clutch was in the city, I could hit an off ramp and down shift to the stop sign or red light without ever using the clutch. 
Of course in the Mountains and steep grades with a different matter, I'd engage my Jake Brake (engine brake) as soon as I hit the hills and mountains or major traffic on interstates and highways.
Using the jake Brake cause the engine to lose RPM's so quickly I had to use the clutch.

Driving a lorry Truck would stange to me, Looking right out over the windshield to the ground.
Once A Rogue, Always A Rogue!
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#24
(08-16-2018, 08:31 AM)BIAD Wrote:
(08-15-2018, 10:59 PM)guohua Wrote: ...Here is a picture from the bedroom area of a 2009 386 Peterbilt.
Ours didn't have the extra bunk bed for a second driver, we had one full size bed, Refrigerator
and microwave and small closet space with storage under the bed and above. 

Great Scott! A veritable home-from-home!

When I was in my teens, I used to travel the UK with my friend in his little Mercedes flat-back truck.
It had no sleeping compartment -unless you count the seats and the floor!
I'll attach some picture of the sleeping area of a 2007 386 Peterbilt truck.
We really don't have any bed area pictures of our truck, my wife took the pictures and that area was off limits for pictures.  mediumwink 
Our's actually looked very similar to this picture, except our top blanker wasn't Red.
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Here is another picture of the same sleeper, yes we had my Coffee Maker and my wife had her Tea Maker and Rice Cooker, refrigerator and microwave.
Our truck had an APU (auxiliary power unit) on it for 110 volts, plus it ran our A/C or Heater at night without having to idle our engine 24/7 on the road.
The APU unit was a small diesel two cylinder generator. 
So yes, we had standard AC outlets in the sleeper for plugging in appliances.
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You can imagine staying and living in this for 30 to 40 days a time before coming home to take some time off.
You Wash Clothes and Take Showers at Truck Stops and stop at a walmart or other shopping center like a Winnco to buy what you need, food to cook in your Microwave and Drinks and Vegetable, Fruits and anything else you may need.
Under the bed was a large storage area, plus you can see the size of the refrigerator/freezer there at the right of the picture. 
That black object in the picture on the left is where our Microwave was and that pullout you see under it was a table.
Once A Rogue, Always A Rogue!
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#25
Remember the ooh-aah about electric cars and Elon Musk's determination to drag the world away from Big Oil?

Maybe we can cast our minds back to the time when the mainstream media were falling over each other to explain
how London and the surrounding wastelands of the UK would become of an island of silent, clean-air drivers with
smiling Arabs all happy to see us not using their only product.

With the recent revelations from Japan in regards of Nissan falsifying data about exhaust emissions and the many
other car companies also failing to live-up to the hype about enviroment-friendly vehicles, the idea of an electric car
seemed strange to those -here on Rogue Nation, who pondered on the logistics of it all.

Maybe it was all a media campaign to promote a company on the Stock Exchange or maybe it was all true and the
Jetsons lifestyle was just around the corner. But unless you've got the cash and are willing to wait for your electric car,
such a dream is just that.

Quote:Tesla sheds $US5.4 billion after Elon Musk admits job stress getting to him.

'Shares of Electric car maker Tesla have tumbled about 9 per cent after CEO Elon Musk conceded in a newspaper
interview that job stress may be getting the best of him.

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Tesla shares closed at $US305.50 ($417.56) on Friday (local time), their lowest level since August 1, as analysts
and business professors questioned whether the company's board should grant Mr Musk leave or even replace
him with a more seasoned CEO.
The decline lopped $US5.4 billion off Tesla's market value.

In an interview with the New York Times Mr Musk admitted the past year had been the most "difficult and painful" of
his career. The newspaper reported that during an hour-long telephone interview Mr Musk alternated between laughter
and tears, acknowledging he was working up to 120 hours a week and sometimes took Ambien to get to sleep.

"It's kind of bizarre," said Charles Elson, director of the corporate governance centre at the University of Delaware.
"It's a drama we shouldn't be watching." Still, Mr Musk said in the interview he had no plans to give up his dual role
as Tesla's chairman and CEO.

Board supports Musk
Since the interview Tesla's board had shown no sign of taking any action. In a statement, the directors -excluding Mr
Musk himself -praised the CEO's dedication to the company.

"Over the past 15 years, Elon's leadership of the Tesla team has caused Tesla to grow from a small start-up to having
hundreds of thousands of cars on the road that customers love, employing tens of thousands of people around the world,
and creating significant shareholder value in the process," the statement said, without addressing Mr Musk's recent
behaviour.

The interview puts board members in a difficult position because Mr Musk, who entered Tesla as a major investor
and built the company into a force that has changed the perception of electric cars, is the company's public identity.
But Erik Gordon, a University of Michigan business and law professor, said Tesla's board had a fiduciary duty to
shareholders to take action.

"If the board does not get him out of this slot, at a minimum on a leave-of-absence basis, I think the board is going to
be seen by a lot of people who love the company as being derelict in their duties," Professor Gordon said.

The board has stood behind Mr Musk despite some bizarre behaviour. In July he labelled a diver who aided in the
cave rescue of Thai soccer players as a paedophile. He later apologised. But a tweet Mr Musk fired off last week
reportedly made him and the directors the targets of securities regulators, and may force the board to act.

Mr Musk tweeted he had "funding secured" to take Tesla private and avoid the quarterly earnings pressures from
Wall Street. The out-of-the-blue announcement raised a huge ruckus and pushed Tesla's shares up 11 per cent in
a day, boosting the company's value by $US6 billion.

There were multiple reports the US Securities and Exchange Commission was investigating the disclosure, including
asking board members what they knew about Mr Musk's plans. Experts said regulators were likely investigating if
Mr Musk was truthful in the tweet about having the financing set for the deal.

In New York Times interview, Mr Musk stood by the tweet. But he told the newspaper he wrote the tweet inside a
Tesla Model S while he was driving to the airport, and that no-one else reviewed it.
Asked if he regretted it, he said: "Why would I?"

In a separate report, The Wall Street Journal said securities regulators had been investigating if Tesla misled investors
about Model 3 production problems. The company could face sanctions if regulators find it did not accurately portray
production delays to investors.

Questions over Musk's future as CEO
The New York Times cited people familiar with the situation as saying the board had been trying to find a No. 2 executive
to help relieve some of the pressure on Mr Musk. Mr Gordon said the board had to act now or be open to shareholder
lawsuits. He suggested replacing Mr Musk as CEO and keeping him on as a visionary chief technical officer.

The interview and other actions, Mr Gordon said, were signs Mr Musk could no longer handle the CEO job.

Mr Musk spent nights at Tesla's Fremont, California, factory working out production problems on its new Model 3 car that
is supposed to take Tesla from niche luxury carmaker to a mass producer that competes with Detroit.
But Mr Gordon said a CEO would not live at the factory. Instead, he or she would form a team to work overnight and solve
problems.

The company said the board formed a special committee to evaluate proposals to take the company private. It later
disclosed that Mr Musk had talked with the Saudi Arabia Government investment fund about the deal.

Some of Mr Musk's stress comes from critical short-sellers who are betting against the company's success.
But much of it comes from Mr Musk's own pronouncements, such as lofty goals for production of cars or turning a sustained
profit starting this quarter, that might be beyond reach.

Tesla has never made money for a full year and has had only two profitable quarters since it went public in 2010...'
ABC.net:


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#26
If one recalls, there was never any mention in previous posts regarding electric cars in the UK being
subsidised by the Government and that was due to focusing on only one facet of the situation at a time.

Important questions needed to be asked by Journalists in order to understand the impact on the fuel
consumers, but instead we were given the 'Jetsons' -version. Lets not talk about the cost from interested
Government sectors or how car companies will be forced into changing their practices.
Nope, money -like electricity, grows on trees.

'Would electric cars be a good idea around major (London) cities?'
Why yes, reliance on fluctuating and controlled oil markets would give way to electricity and since it's
free and hangs off trees, the cost of running a vehicle would drastically drop. A consumer will now be
able to save a dolphin as they potter through the countryside and know that his pennies are being saved.

'Will the logistics of charging on a busy street in the Cairngorms or the Lake District be an easy act
to implement?'
Sure, places around London Great Britain -where Elon Musk doesn't live, will just simply have electric
-charging facilities instead of those nasty gas-pumps where a customer can crack a nail during filling
up their tank on the way to the opera.

Please believe us and your hover-board is in the mail. Please note: We -the MSM, will now focus on
hybrid vehicles and quietly move away from what we were originally implying.

*Television shows white-noise for a moment and then reality appears on the screen*

Quote:Government-subsidised plug-in cars may never have been charged.

'Tens of thousands of plug-in hybrids (PHEVs) bought with generous government grants may be
burning as much fuel as combustion-engine cars.

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Data compiled for the BBC suggests that such vehicles in corporate fleets averaged just 40 miles
per gallon (mpg), when they could have done 130.
Many drivers may never have unwrapped their charging cables, The Miles Consultancy said.

Subsidies for new PHEVs were recently scrapped, after seven years.
The plug-in grant was introduced in 2011, gifting buyers up to £4,500 off new cars.

The incentive helped the UK become the biggest market for PHEVs in Europe.
The majority of the tens of thousands of eligible vehicles sold were bought by company fleets, including
more than 70% of the 37,000 plug-in hybrids sold so far in 2018.

But data from The Miles Consultancy, a Cheshire firm which advises 300 blue-chip companies on fuel
management, reveals that many businesses simply used the grant to save on buying regular cars.

Mileage records from 1,500 models, including Audi, BMW, Mercedes and Volvo vehicles, showed an
average real-world mpg of 39.27, against an average manufacturer advertised mpg of 129.68.

Figures for 2,432 hybrids -including non plug-in varieties -showed an average real-world mpg of 49.06,
still vastly lower than the potential range.

"There are some examples where employees aren't even charging these vehicles up," said Paul Hollick,
The Miles Consultancy's managing director. "The charge cables are still in the boot, in a cellophane wrapper,
while the company and the employee are going in and out of petrol stations, paying for all of this additional fuel.

This practice, he added, was "ridiculous".

The British Vehicle Rental and Leasing Association (BVRLA), which represents many fleets, said higher taxes
on diesel cars incentivised companies to buy plug-ins, even if they had no intention of using their electric capability.

"We unfortunately have got a situation where a poorly designed tax regime is driving some poor behaviours,"
said Toby Poston, the BVRLA's communications director. "We have got some situations where company drivers
are choosing the vehicle based on their tax liability, rather than having the right vehicle for the right job."

Some companies, he explained, were buying PHEVs -which are best suited to local trips -for employees who
did a lot of motorway driving.

When presented with The Miles Consultancy's findings, a Department for Transport spokesperson said the
government believed plug-in hybrids "bring significant environmental benefits", but would "now focus its
support on zero emission models like pure electric and hydrogen fuel cell cars".

Plug-in hybrid vehicles continue to receive some government support, through lower car tax rates, grants for
charging infrastructure and, in some local authorities, free parking...'
SOURCE:

'...When presented with The Miles Consultancy's findings, a Department for Transport spokesperson said the
government believed plug-in hybrids "bring significant environmental benefits", but would "now focus its
support on zero emission models like pure electric and hydrogen fuel cell cars"...'


And Boris Johnson's brother -Jo, resigns as Transport Minister. Another case of public funds being used to
build-up certain companies and then reap the 'Thank You' rewards for service.
And all the while, the mainstream media went along with the Jetson narrative.

Again, use your perspective in this reality. London is an expensive place to live and up to the point that
salaries in the capital are generally higher than the rest of the country because of it living costs.


Would you resign a well-paid position in Government over point of view (Brexit) and be able to exist as
unemployed in such an expensive area? Or would it be that you were confident that you had a fall-back plan
that would assure income?

This is what happens with most projects, money is thrown at it and in many cases, it's a failure. But only on
the face of it. Large amounts of public money have been used to enhance these companies and later, it's found
that those who're an integral part of benefiting these firms, end-up on the boards of these companies.
...............................................

A similar situation is ongoing regarding the recent Cannabis-oil fiasco in the UK. A story appeared where an
Irish mother and her son who suffers with epilepsy, brought in the heavily-controlled medicine that is suggested
alleviates some seizures.
The story isn't presented with all its facts -as Ms. Cauldwell the mother, is a Director for the company that
sells 'Billy's Bud' cannabis-oil in Ireland.

What also isn't mentioned is the fact that through this misleading story, the UK Government changed their laws
on the medical use of a particular style (Cannabidiol) due to the uproar when Ms. Cauldwell suddenly appeared
at Heathrow airport with her son's medicine purchased from Canada.
What all the Journalists were doing there for her explanation of how Customs had refused her the oil -was never
revealed.

And the connection...? 

Quote:'GW Pharmaceuticals, a company whose largest investor is UK Prime Minister Theresa May’s husband, Philip May,
has received FDA approval for Epidiolex, a new cannabis derived drug to treat childhood epilepsy.
The announcement comes just days after the Home Office relaxed the UK’s strictly controlled ban on the medication
for two children suffering from related conditions.

Home Secretary Sajid Javid issued a licence for a batch of cannabis oil, which is illegal in the UK, to treat Billy Caldwell,
who suffers from violent epileptic seizures. Shortly after the move, Alfie Dingley was also granted a license for the oil,
to treat his epilepsy. Alfie had previously been denied the medication.

The Home Office licenses were issued in the middle of June, with FDA approval of GW’s new medicine being announced
on the 25th June, in a GW press release aimed at London and California. 
The approval for Epidiolex would have been given before the 25th...'
SOURCE:

When you look at the dates and timeline, one can see that they're all at it.


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#27
Someone else gets it.



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#28
(07-19-2019, 04:00 PM)BIAD Wrote: Someone else gets it.




I have to completely agree with him.
He is absolutely correct, CABAL / Elites are using the Sexual Liberation Identity Crap on everyone to make Slave of the Common Person.

People need to Wake The Fuck UP!
Once A Rogue, Always A Rogue!
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#29
It's not as simple as they make out in futuristic movies.



Quote:Rising Cost of Raw Materials for Battery Production Could Curtail EV Sales.
Expensive batteries mean expensive cars.

'Most automakers are undertaking ambitious plans to add more electric cars to their lineups in order to keep up
with consumer trends and future-proof their businesses, but financial analysts at HSBC are skeptical.
The firm believes high prices for lithium and cobalt—two metals used in current electric-car batteries—could hinder
future sales, according to Bloomberg.

"High lithium and cobalt prices--but also limited supply and lower demand for pure EVs--now favor more plug-in hybrids
in the short to medium term versus our previous expectation." HSBC analysts Alexandre Falcao and Augusto Ensiki said
in a report.

They predicted that by 2025, global market share for electric cars will reach 9.4 percent, compared to a previous estimate
of 10.5 percent. But the analysts increased their predicted plug-in hybrid market share rose from 2.4 percent to 5.5 percent.

Lithium supplies will remain "reasonably tight" due to low availability and increased demand for batteries, the analysts said.
However, they noted that electric cars will likely still see a sales boost around 2020, due to lower battery prices and an influx
of new models. But the analysts believe that the costs for battery materials will cap growth.

HSBC isn't the first organization to point to materials costs as a potential obstacle for electric cars.
Earlier this year, Bloomberg predicted that cobalt supplies would not be able to keep up with automakers' demand.

The metal is already proving difficult to source. Most of the world's cobalt comes from the Democratic Republic of the Congo,
which has a poor human rights record. Panasonic has come under scrutiny for accidentally supplying batteries to Tesla
containing Cuban cobalt, violating the United States sanctions against Cuba.

Companies have discussed creating cobalt-free batteries, or investing in solid-state batteries, a much-touted alternative to
today's lithium-ion batteries. But these ideas are still under development. Meanwhile, automakers are preparing to launch
more electric cars. For now, they'll have to make the most of limited lithium and cobalt supplies...'
SOURCE:

Of course, the MSM continue to tow the line of their controllers:


Quote:Electric cars news - Here’s when they are expected to cost the same as petrol and diesel.

'New research has suggested when electric cars could cost the same as petrol and diesel vehicles in the
UK and it is sooner than you may expect...'
The Express:


I know that there are plenty of 'myth-busters' on the internet that state electric cars have a smaller carbon
footprint than conventional vehicles and that's partly true. But this unfair statistic is solely based on the finished
product and not the acquisition of the materials to construct the main component, the battery.
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#30
(07-19-2019, 04:00 PM)BIAD Wrote: Someone else gets it.




"Someone else gets it"? You have a talent for understatement - he's a freaking genius!

When 'lectrics were first discussed here in the US, the consensus amongst us freedom-loving folk was that they were designed to implement population control by concentrating people in the cities. When your transport has such limited range before needing a cumbersome recharge, you are necessarily limited to a small radius of travel. That would be a situation ideally suited to They Who are Above This (T.W.A.T) who want to concentrate people in urban areas for the control that provides. When you have a country of mostly Urbanites, you can control their lives from cradle to grave by controlling their energy consumption, and even their food consumption. Is the populace getting out of hand? Just cut off their lights, their water, and their food - an easy thing to do with a concentrated urban population. Flip a switch, the city goes dark, water stops flowing from the tap, chaos ensues. Block deliveries to grocery stores, and hungry, thirsty people will do pretty much whatever you say to get their belly full.

At that point, you OWN them, the same as any plantation master of old.

A few years ago, we moved from Kansas City to here. We had a single pickup truck, piled everything we had gathered on to it, filled it up with gasoline, and took off. 19 hours later, after a couple of 10 minute fuel stops, we were here. I just drove straight through, half way across the nation, and only stopped for gas. Had I been forced to do that in a 'lectric, the time factor would have drastically increased. As far as I know, there are no 10 minute stops to recharge your vehicle with electricity. If I were limited to a 'lectric, I'd rather have used horses - fuel for them is EVERYWHERE!

Just today, we drove 120 miles (round trip) just to go to a decent steak house. We did it in a gas-guzzlin' Jeep. It's an older model Jeep, made the year before they made the last real Jeeps, and is known far and wide to be able to climb trees when modern Jeeps can't even get out of bed... but that comes at a price, and that price is being able to consume great quantities of gasoline. The 'lectric hasn't been made that can do what my Jeep can. If you can show me one that can, I will eat this Jeep starting with the bumper, and not stop until the tailpipe is digested.

Mobility is freedom, and curtailing folks' ability to be mobile is control... and that is what this "Great Green 'Lectric Revolution" is all about. They give not a rat's ass about "the environment" - that is just opium for the masses - it's ALL about their ability to control the population. "Climate Change" ( I started to type "Global Warming" before I recalled that excuse has been shot down in flames) is just a population control measure so that They Who are Above This (T.W.A.T) can get most if not all humans corralled into controlled cities.

The 04-2019 issue of "National Geographic" magazine is entitled "Cities", and subtitled "Ideas for a Brighter Future". I picked up a copy, read through it, and was utterly amazed at what they are trying to convince unthinking people can be done. It can't. Not as presented. They had visions of self-reliant cities, compact and concentrated, but which can somehow generate their own needs - food for example. Do you realize how much space is required to feed a SINGLE family for a year? That amount of space is not, and cannot be made, available in an urban environment... especially not a "concentrated population" urban environment. Multiply that space by a million or so, and you begin to see the infeasability of their pipe dreams.

That is just ONE example of the point where the plans break down. There are dozens more, but an unthinking population will fail to evaluate the threat they are willingly walking into for convenience's sake. An urban kid was asked some years ago if he knew where his hamburger came from. His immediate reply was "the grocery store, of course!", and he had no idea of what went into the production of a quarter pound hamburger, or where or how that was accomplished - he just thought it magically appeared at "the grocery store, of course!".

And so it goes as the sheep are led to slaughter.

The new James Bond flick he mentioned blew my mind. 007 laid low by PC? Cock-blocked by a mere feminist? The Bond I recall would never have stood still for such an outrage! Let's hope his fandom will not, either - else they just get what they deserve! If it does not contain a scene where Daniel Craig marches up to "M" and demands that his number be retired or else he will kill every living thing within 40 km of where he stands, then the movie is a failure, right out of the gate, and a betrayal of all things Bond. Ian Fleming will be spinning like a top.

ETA: I nearly forgot. Batteries. I know a man, personally, who yet lives, who was involved in classified R+D in the late 1970's of a battery. He said they developed a battery, the size of an automobile battery, that could power the city of Cleveland, OH (population at that time around 750,000) for 4 years. The entire city. 4 years. I wonder why we never heard of that battery since? I wonder why they can't put something like that in 'Lectrics to increase their range? things that make you go "hmmmm..."

.
" I don't mind killin' a man in a fair fight... or if I think he's gonna start a fair fight... or if there's money involved... or a woman... "

 - Jayne Cobb, Hero of Canton
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#31
Electric Cars:
I cannot add anything that would improve the above statements, right on the money.
minusculethumbsup minusculethumbsup minusculethumbsup


'Jane Bond':
This trick of 'anger-gossip-makes-good-advertising' by the movie companies will only come back to bite them
on the asses. They perceive their audiences as fickle and believe that catering for a minority -a group who just
want a win -not a change, will sustain their industry.

The audiences are already dwindling, damaging established character-roles is a stupid move and drives possible
box-office money further away. 

It's a ring-and-run manoeuvre, the blue-haired kids of today who're forcing this will be the parents of tomorrow
and as they mentally develop, their views will change and the constant degrading of males, the push to advertise
same-sex relationships and the idea that emotions are the driving-force of first-world countries, will ensure that
these older 'revolutionaries' will refuse to take their kids to the cinema.
(Another facet of family values down the f*ckin' drain.)
tinysure

Nothing has really changed, Trump is Captain Hook to these current outraged 'Lost Boys', Bush had the role as well
as Nixon. The only difference is that these idiots in the movie business will be out on their ear quicker than usual,
when the wind changes again.
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