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Up to 1,000 children ‘drugged, beaten and raped’ in Telford grooming scandal
#1
Now we have the truth coming out about the child sex abuse in GB, however if you look at Europe its very common that rape and child rape come hand in hand when islam gets a foot hold. 
How much longer well our wimp leaders let this happen, how much longer before the people take matters into there own hands.
If the police and social workers know about it, then the muslim leaders knew about it.
It is interesting that mohamed raped little girls, and that the greatest wish of most muslims is to be like mohamed


Up to 1,000 children ‘drugged, beaten and raped’ in Telford grooming scandal Zoe DrewettSunday 11 Mar 2018 9:51 am
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Telford’s MP has called for a ‘Rotherham-style’ inquiry into child sexual abuse in Telford 

Girls as young as 11 were drugged, beaten and raped in Telford, with up to 1,000 children estimated to have
suffered abuse in the town, a new investigation has found. An investigation by the Sunday Mirror uncovered
the shocking grooming scandal, believed to have been taking place over a 40 year period.

As a result of the findings, Telford MP Lucy Allan has called for an inquiry into child sexual exploitation in the town.
Allegations reported to date back to the 1980s are said to have been mishandled by authorities, with many perpetrators
going unpunished, while it is claimed similar abuse is continuing in the area.

The Tory MP previously called for a Rotherham-style inquiry into the allegations and called the latest reports ‘extremely
serious and shocking’. ‘There must now be an independent inquiry into child sexual exploitation in Telford so that our
community can have absolute confidence in the authorities,’ she told the paper.

Lucy Allan, MP for Telford, called the latest reports ‘extremely serious and shocking’ 
An estimate of the number of victims was calculated with the help of Professor Liz Kelly, from the Child and Woman Abuse
Studies Unit at London Metropolitan University, who reviewed the Mirror’s figures.

Dino Nocivelli, a specialist child abuse solicitor, told the Mirror: ‘These children were treated as sexual commodities by men
who inflicted despicable acts of abuse. ‘The survivors deserve an inquiry.

They need to know how abuse took place for so long and why so many perpetrators have never been brought to justice.

Seven men were jailed in 2013 following Operation Chalice, a police inquiry into child prostitution in the Telford area.
The paper says authorities were warned of the abuse a decade before Operation Chalice. The Sunday Mirror investigation
found up to 1,000 children may have been abused.

A spokesperson for Telford and Wrekin Council told the paper: ‘Child sexual exploitation (CSE) is a vile, evil crime.
It’s an issue right across the UK and has been for a long time. ‘Telford will be covered by the national CSE review.
We welcome this. ‘All agencies continue to work very closely together and this remains our top priority.


Read more: http://metro.co.uk/2018/03/11/1000-child...to=cbshare
Twitter: https://twitter.com/MetroUK | Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MetroUK/
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#2
The organised evil that nobody wants to talk about.

Thank you WF, this behavior is rife in all the major towns and  because it feeds
into a a clientele that involves the rich and powerful, the blindfold remains firmly
pulled down over the face of public justice.
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#3
Terrible... just terrible!   minusculeredtantrum 

Q mentioned the spirit cooking topic in one of his last posts.  He says we (the public who are awakened) have to "set the stage" and get the others ready to hear this before it can come out.  It will be too "hard to swallow" for those who don't have a clue that this is happening.

I hope once this is exposed to the masses we can unite to put a stop to this around the world. 

What we have to do is start talking about it to our family and friends and get it exposed, get them ready to hear what's about to be dropped.

It's horrific what's happening to the children. We need to get this done as quickly as possible so we can save the children presently in captivity.   tinycrying




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#4
So Upsetting, another Sick Religion.

In the Christian religion you hear people ask, "What Would God Do.?"
In the one or more of the Islam Beliefs people make ask, "What Would Muhammad Do?"
And the answer is,,,,, "Rape the 9 year old."
Once A Rogue, Always A Rogue!
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#5
In the interests of showing that the British authorities conduct themselves with a fair, steadily-paced sense
of justice and the mainstream media follow like-wise in their even-handedness, The Guardian release this
biased piece about a fellow Sunday newspaper.
tinysure 

As Wallfire showed with this thread, Asian male grooming gangs seem to have no problem in organising
and carrying out an act that we as readers, never truly think about in a manner that doesn't involve emotion.

Some medias report the story, but they dwell on the horror, the torment promoted by the parental links we
all share. Within the wording of such sensational reports, the actual truth is evaded and for possibly political
and ideology reasons, information of the criminals is missed out.

Read the first piece below and tell me who were the people who did this and recall if you can, how the shooter
in Las Vegas was named and had photographs displayed on every media across the world.

Quote:Up to 1,000 children may have been victims in worst UK abuse ring.

'...Up to 1,000 children could have fallen victim to child sexual exploitation in Telford over a 40-year-period,
according to a Sunday newspaper.

An investigation by the Sunday Mirror gathered allegations of abuse in the Shropshire town said to include
cases involving girls as young as 11 who were drugged, beaten and raped.

Allegations reported to date back to the 1980s are said to have been mishandled by authorities, with many
perpetrators going unpunished, while it was claimed similar abuse is continuing in the area.
Telford’s Conservative MP, Lucy Allan, has previously called for a Rotherham-style inquiry into the allegations
and called the latest reports “extremely serious and shocking”.

“There must now be an independent inquiry into child sexual exploitation in Telford so that our community
can have absolute confidence in the authorities,” she told the paper. An estimate of the number of victims was
calculated with the help of Professor Liz Kelly, from the Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit at London
Metropolitan University, who reviewed the Mirror’s figures...'

Anything yet...? We have names and positions of people who aren't involved in the acts of abuse.
At this point, it could be a group of young men or women. Nothing in this article tells us the victims can even
identify who committed the crimes.

Quote:'...Dino Nocivelli, a specialist child abuse solicitor, told the newspaper: “These children were treated as sexual
commodities by men who inflicted despicable acts of abuse. The survivors deserve an inquiry.
“They need to know how abuse took place for so long and why so many perpetrators have never been brought to justice.”

Seven men were jailed in 2013 following Operation Chalice, a police inquiry into child prostitution in the Telford area.
The paper says authorities were warned of the abuse a decade before Operation Chalice.
A spokesperson for Telford and Wrekin council told the paper: “Child sexual exploitation is a vile, evil crime.
It’s an issue right across the UK and has been for a long time.

“Telford will be covered by the national [child sexual exploitation] review. We welcome this
 All agencies continue to work very closely together and this remains our top priority.”..'
The Guardian:

And that's the full article, although on the page there's a link that brings you to a story that describes how the
girls were bribed and 'persuaded' into perfoming the sexual acts. These mysterious seven men -who were
actually convicted in 2013 are only named half-way down the article in a piece that was published in 2011!!
Link:

Quote:'...The men – who are aged between 21 and 59 and include three brothers – face a total of 55 charges including rape,
child prostition, sexual activity with a child and trafficking children within the UK.

"This case is about exploitation," said Debbi Gould, prosecuting. "The Crown say that the men in the dock variously
trafficked, raped or sexually abused girls both over and under the age of 16 years over a considerable period of time."

Three of the men, brothers Ahdel Ali, 23; Mubarek Ali, 28; and Tanveer Ahmed, 39; are accused of acting as "pimps"
and exploited their victims.
Others, including Abdul Rouf, 34, and the oldest defendant Mohammed Younis, 59, used their homes as brothels to
allow men to engage in sexual activities with the girls, the court heard...'

My sarcastic remark at the top of this posting is in order to suggest that not only are the local Councils around the
United Kingdom are terrified to confront a culture that endorses these crimes, the Government and their 'toady'
media servants are afraid to also.

It's not about overt political correctness causing officialdom to balk at holding brown-skinned people to account,
it's simply that they believe this type of religious/cultural oppression will never reach the status of the Establishment's
classs-setting.
'Let them eat cake' comes to mind.

Forty years... think about that for a moment. Families burned in their homes, young girls aborting because of unwanted
pregnancies from the abuse, beatings and rapes, drugs being and used, brothels being set up... and for forty years, the
Police force of Telford, the Council of Telford and the public of that town did nothing.

I found this image in The Independent...
[Image: attachment.php?aid=3359]
'...Mubarek Ali ran a grooming gang in Telford, Shropshire, targeting vulnerable young girls and
sold them for sex around the country.'
The Independent:

He sold them around the country. The planning, communication and execution of this trade involves far-more than
just a line under a photograph. It indicates that there's a market within the British Isles that perceives the 'product'
in such a way that being human is a secondary consideration.

Think about transportation of the abused to locales around the country, think about the transporter and the victim being
away from friends and family and how questions of absence were being resolved. The vehicles used, the way of avoiding
possible detection through telephone or the internet and frame of mind to burn to death people because of an unwanted
situation.
Forty years.

Young women -predominantly white, are commodities in a certain manner that doesn't reside in deviancy, it's resides
in a culture.





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#6
There is so much more I could tell from my years teaching muslims but most people would not believe it.
I can tell you its not just the white children that suffer, I have been told by young muslim women that they have been threaten under the orders of the muslim leaders in there town to stop been so "Westeren" or they will be beaten and raped, some told me this has happened to them, and they cant tell the police or the leaders will order an attack on there families.
It seems the muslims like to use the somalis to do this, and remember its done under the orders of the muslim religious leaders.
There is no protection for these young muslim women and children.
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#7
(03-12-2018, 04:12 PM)Wallfire Wrote: There is so much more I could tell from my years teaching muslims but most people would not believe it.
I can tell you its not just the white children that suffer, I have been told by young muslim women that they have been threaten under the orders of the muslim leaders in there town to stop been so "Westeren" or they will be beaten and raped, some told me this has happened to them, and they cant tell the police or the leaders will order an attack on there families.
It seems the muslims like to use the somalis to do this, and remember its done under the orders of the muslim religious leaders.
There is no protection for these young muslim women and children.

And it's gonna get worse before it gets better.
tinysure
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#8
I know it's an emotive issue and I know that people tend to want to explain how a failure occurs through
a multiple of reasons. But the time-frame tells the truth and there's no other way around it but to say that
we've become so afraid of being called names.

[UK] Child sexual exploitation: How the system failed.


Quote:'Grooming, rape, trafficking, or the many other ways children are being sexually abused, the subject of child sexual exploitation
-or CSE as it is known by professionals in the field -is in the headlines with depressing regularity.
Telford is currently in the spotlight - but is by no means the first place and will not be the last.

There were so many opportunities - in Rotherham, in Rochdale, in Oxford - to step in and help.
No-one did. The exploitation continued...'

There'll be data in these regions that should've alerted the Police to what was really happening.


Quote:'...Not only did the cycle of abuse grind on, but the message given to the victims must have been that "we don't care about you".

One 13-year-old girl, "with disrupted clothing", was found by police in a house in the early hours with a group of men who had
given her vodka. A neighbour had called the police after hearing the girl scream. The teenager was arrested for being drunk
and disorderly. The men were not questioned.

A 12-year-old girl was found, being plied with alcohol, in a car with a 22-year-old man.
He had indecent images of her on his phone. No action was taken.

Rather than being offered protection, teenagers groomed and coerced into having sex faced criminal charges of prostitution.
A major factor was the public -and professional -perception of the abused girls, who were often dismissed as troublemakers.

As the Children's Society 1995 Game's Up report asked: "Is it acceptable that a child abused at home is protected, whereas
a child abused on the street is criminalised?"

And the media unwittingly helped to obscure the scale of the abuse, referring to children as the "girlfriends" of adult men.
When in 2001, Lucy Lowe was murdered in Telford -along with her mother and sister -by the 26-year-old man who had groomed
and abused her, news outlets -including the BBC -described the adult killer as Lucy's "boyfriend".

She was 16 and pregnant with her second child by Azhar Ali Mehmood, who set fire to the Lowe family home.
The infant, who had been in the house, was later found wrapped in a blanket in the garden.

In court, the prosecution barrister Adrian Redgrave QC said: "There had also been occasions when he had been, in one way
or another, humiliated in front of others by things that Lucy had said or done. He was jealous and possessive."
The court heard they had a "stormy relationship and argued frequently, sometimes about her relationships with other men".

It makes for difficult reading.
At no point is a suggestion made that this was not a "relationship" and that Lucy was a victim of rape.
Targeted by Mehmood aged 12 and giving birth to her first child at 14, she was legally incapable of consent.

[Image: attachment.php?aid=3380]
Lucy Lowe.

It was later to emerge that Lucy's situation was far from unusual. Operation Chalice, launched by West Mercia Police, led to
the jailing of a group of Asian men, mostly of Pakistani origin, whom police said may have targeted more than 100 girls.

"Even five years ago, people were talking about the 'lifestyle choices' these young people were making," says Adele Gladman,
the Home Office researcher who reported the scale of abuse in Rotherham.

As recently as 2012, when 24-year-old Ahdel Ali was convicted of raping a 13-year-old girl and jailed for 18 years, his barrister
asked the judge to be lenient because "this type of rape is not like other horrible types of rapes".

It now seems astonishing, but lawyer Tayyab Khan stood up in court and said the child "had loved" Ali, who had been "pleasant
to her" and it had been "a consensual relationship". A message both damaging and dangerous.
But the language used to describe young people in abusive situations is slowly changing

 A significant factor was the abolishment of the term "child prostitution" in favour of the term child sexual exploitation, first used
in 2009 in a Department for Education document.
A small change, perhaps, but it shifted the focus and clarified that the children involved were victims, not perpetrators, of crimes.
According to research carried out by Barnardo's, describing victims as a "girlfriend" or "boyfriend" can make it more difficult for
them to realise they are in an abusive situation.

The Jay Report cites cases in which abusers targeted children when they knew there was a chance the victim might be especially
vulnerable, such as those living in local authority residential units, and who have "a desperate need for attention and affection".
Those in local authority care are often deliberately targeted for exploitation as they may not have the same support in their lives,
with adults who can spot that they are at risk.

The Barnardo's research indicates "perpetrators of this type of CSE will particularly draw on children's feelings of loneliness,
their need for care, and their desire to be loved".
A girl starved of attention and kindness is more likely to believe she is in a caring relationship, leaving the perpetrator free to
coerce her to have sex with friends or associates. As a result, children will often protect the perpetrator, even when the
 recognise their behaviour as exploitative and abusive.

"I know he loves me. He has other girlfriends, but I'm special," was a sentiment often uttered in the investigation into
what happened in Rotherham. Many victims do not want to co-operate with the criminal justice system.

A care worker, who was employed at children's homes from 2003-2007, spoke anonymously to the BBC in 2014.
He said men would arrive almost "every night" to collect girls, who escaped using a range of methods and were then
usually driven off in taxis...'

From a Care-Home. Organised and sanctioned by more than just a worker working a late shift.

Quote:'..."Children who have been abused do not blame their attacker simply because they "are struggling for love".
"But you cannot provide love in a children's unit. It's one thing that you can't provide, and as a corporate parent it's where we fail.
"And if [the abusers] are providing that, plus drugs, and alcohol and freedoms, or perceived freedoms, then we're never going
to be able to keep them safe."

Dr Helen Beckett, director at the University of Bedfordshire centre of researching CSE says: "What is common across all forms
of CSE is the rarity with which young people disclose what is happening to them.

"There are many different reasons for this - many young people don't even realise the abusive nature of what is happening.
Some may even feel in some way complicit in the abuse because there has been some kind of 'reward' or receipt of something."
That can be gifts, alcohol, drugs, or affection. In some cases victims are so traumatised they use drink or drugs to cope.
But they then need the means to get the drink or drugs. It's a vicious circle.
Ms Gladman says this is one area in which "nothing has changed".

"The grooming is so good, so targeted and tailored that the girls -and boys -involved don't understand they are being exploited.
They don't listen to warnings. They're desperate for love and attention and it's up to the experts to recognise that, to spot who is
vulnerable, and almost follow the grooming process themselves.
"We have to engage with the young people and make them feel worthwhile, give them life skills."

There is, however, a danger in thinking the only people at risk are those with difficult histories.
As Ms Gladman points out: "Parents tend to believe it's kids from troubled families who are at risk.
"Any child can be vulnerable if not protected."

While some of the most high-profile cases of CSE have involved gangs of men with Pakistani heritage abusing white girls,
Dr Beckett points out that there is "no typical CSE case".
"It exists across every ethnic grouping, both in terms of those perpetrating and in terms of those experiencing the abuse.
Research tells us that both males and females are abused through CSE. Similarly, both males and females perpetrate the abuse.

"Whilst most of our focus historically has been on adults abusing children, we are increasingly learning about peer-on-peer abuse
and the risk that young people face within their own social settings."

One example is that of Laura Wilson, a 17-year-old murdered by Ashtiaq Asghar -also 17 -in Rotherham in 2010.
He stabbed her multiple times and pushed her into a canal to die.
Once again, the press described the killer as her "boyfriend" at the same time as reporting that Laura had a four-month-old
daughter with Asghar's friend, and that they "treated white girls as 'sexual targets' and not like human beings"...'

"...Treated white girls as 'sexual targets' and not like human beings". A possible heads-up?


No, this is a combination of failure from upper-middle-class journalism and the fear of being accused of racism.
Here's an idea, anyone reading this please visit your Doctor and ask him if it's okay if you tend to see those around
you as 'not like human beings'

We're not talking about deviants here, men and women of all colours do terrible things. This is a culture... a culture
we're afraid of facing because of that skin colour.

Quote:'...Peter Grigg from the Children's Society says there has been a gradual change in attitudes towards the nature of exploitation,
and the exposure of the abuse in Rotherham, Rochdale and other places "has certainly ensured decision-makers and the
public pay attention to issues".

But how is the issue tackled?
Everybody involved in child protection agrees there is no single solution. No one agency holds the answers.
According to the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse, systematic grooming and sexual abuse of children by groups
of offenders in cities and towns of England and Wales is "widespread".

Adele Gladman says that over the past 12 years in which she has been working in the field, there is no geographical location
where it is not a problem. Peter Grigg says it's "very likely that many other victims exist that haven't yet felt able to speak out".

The charity's Old Enough to Know better? report showed that 50,000 females aged 16 and 17 experienced sexual offences
against them but only around 5,000 of them were reported to the police.
The actual figures are impossible to accurately predict, says Cassi Harrison, director of the Centre of Expertise on Child Sexual
Abuse.

"Due to data limitations, we are making decisions in a fog.
We just can't say if more children are being sexually abused. We know we are identifying more of it, but this the tip of the iceberg.

"Reported numbers are increasing, but that could be because of increased willingness of victims to report linked to confidence
they will be taken seriously, increased professional awareness of the signs of abuse and commitment to take action -or because
recording has improved."...'
SOURCE:


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