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Five Huge Unanswered Questions About The Las Vegas Shooting
#1
im sure there are many more questions to be answered

Three days after 64-year-old Stephen Paddock opened fire on Las Vegas concertgoers late Sunday night, several huge questions remain unanswered.

WHO, if anyone, helped Paddock carry out his operation?
Clark Country Sheriff Joseph Lombardo said at a press conference Wednesday night that he assumes Paddock likely had help in carrying out his mass murder.

“You got to make the assumption he had to have help at some point, and we want to ensure that’s the answer,” Lombardo said. “Maybe he’s a super guy, super hero–not a hero, super–I won’t use the word. Maybe he’s super — that was working out this out on his own, but it will be hard for me to believe that.”

So far, there is no publicly available evidence that Paddock had help in carrying out his plot.

If, as the sheriff believes, Paddock had help, the question remains: from whom? Paddock’s longtime girlfriend, Marilou Danley, was in the Philippines at the time of the attack. She claims to have had no knowledge of Paddock’s murderous intentions.

WHAT was Paddock planning to do with a car full of bomb-making materials?
Law enforcement officials discovered large quantities of bomb-making materials in Paddock’s car, which was parked at the Mandalay Bay hotel.

Lombardo told reporters on Monday that ammonium nitrate, a chemical compound used to make homemade bombs, was found in Paddock’s car. On Wednesday, Lombardo said that law enforcement officers also found 50 pounds of Tannerite, an explosive chemical, in Paddock’s car.

It’s unclear what Paddock ultimately aimed to do with the car full of bomb-making materials.

HOW did Paddock plan to escape?
Sheriff Lombardo said Wednesday night that he has reason to believe that Paddock originally planned to remain alive or escape after carrying out the mass murder.

Paddock committed suicide after detecting an unarmed security guard outside his room.

How did he plan to escape? That question remains unanswered.

WATCH WHERE PADDOCK SHOT FROM:


WHY did Paddock buy a room overlooking another concert the week before?
Paddock purchased a room at the Ogden Las Vegas during another music festival, Life Is Beautiful, the previous weekend.

Paddock’s room at the Ogden, like his room at the Mandalay Bay, overlooked the concert venue.

Was the Ogden room a practice run for Sunday night’s massacre? Was it a target? “We don’t know yet,” Lombardo said.

WHY?
The biggest question in the wake of the shooting: Why did he do it?

More than 72 hours after the deadliest mass shooting in American history, the public still has no answer for why Paddock did what he did.
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#2
Some of these questions may never be answered because dead men don't talk. But, more and more witnesses are coming forward who might be able to answer whether more shooters were involved. So far, they all say YES! 

Unrelated to this, or maybe it is, is this news article from Tennessee.


Quote:JOHNSON CITY, Tenn. (AP) — Federal agents are trying to determine why a man pulled over for speeding in Tennessee was carrying a cache of weapons including two submachine guns and 900 rounds of ammunition.

Deputies found Scott Edmisten, 43, of Johnson City, carrying a .357-caliber Magnum, a loaded .45-caliber semi-automatic, a .223-caliber fully automatic assault rifle, a .308-caliber fully automatic assault rifle, more than 900 rounds of ammunition, and survival equipment, Washington County Sheriff Ed Graybeal said.

Read More...

This speeder was stopped on Oct. 2nd after the shooting on Oct. 1st.  Had he been in Las Vegas? 
The Sheriff doesn't seem to think so.

Quote:Authorities still haven't determined why Edmisten was carrying all that firepower, but they "don't see a connection" to recent mass shootings, Knight said.

I hope the sheriff had the good sense to check the weapons to see if they had been fired recently.  If not, maybe he was on his way to another big event to copycat Paddock.  I'm glad they caught him before another tragedy unfolded.




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#3
(10-05-2017, 01:57 PM)Wallfire Wrote: im sure there are many more questions to be answered...
If I may be so bold, I have some more questions to ask!!!

My better-half has informed me many times that one of my failings is that I always take a discussion away from the 'now-ism'
of what the goal is of an action and enter the boring world of logistics of an event and what reasons are strong enough to 
successfully obtain that goal. My wife's term is 'knowing the far-end of the fart'!

In this particular case, the standard reports are saying that Stephen Paddock collected his arsenal over a number of years.
In itself, this doesn't necessarily hint at a deliberate destructive agenda as such, gun enthusiasts collect different styles of
firearms for several reasons and the act of killing human beings isn't usually one of them!

Ignoring Eric Paddock's confusing rhetoric, it seems that his brother wasn't a avid hobbyist of guns and from reading articles
regarding his activities, Stephen Paddock's neighours in Florida and Nevada tended to relate that he was more interested in
gambling and property opportunities.

I'm hoping fellow-members can enlighten us with how a firearm is acquired in general -as being a Brit, my knowledge is very
limited.

*If one walks into a Gun Store, how does it work...? What can you purchase and what legal documentation does one need?
Basically, what type of firearm can a person walk out of that store with and what level of purchase is officialdom then notified?

*Is it cultural enough that checking the safe storage of firearms and abundance of privately-owned guns isn't an act that a
Government department exists for?
*Are private sales monitored in some extent?
*Are weapons that are deemed 'illegal' seen in general as an item that is only 'wrong' when in the hands of a maniac?
*If it comes to light that a privately-bought gun was -at some time in it's history stolen, what protocols are in place to nuture
a honest approach to notifying authorities without bringing trouble to the unwitting buyer's door?
*What is the day-to-day perception of the average person in the US when it comes to having a handgun in the bedside drawer
or a rifle stored high up on a shelf in the garage?

I am ignorant of the illegal sales of ammunition and firearms and often wonder how an individual goes about hiding the
materials and information that he-or-she has illegally purchased.

*Is it generally accepted socially that having the gun is far-more important than where it came from?
*What are the thoughts -in general, of adults who own guns and have children in the same home as the weapons?
*Are the stored guns ready to use or are they dismantled to some degree?

These questions may seem pompous considering the proliferation of gun crimes in poverty-ridden areas, but if we're to accept
the reported narrative of this elderly Mesquite resident... would a law-abiding millionaire with multiple properties and a private jet,
seek the weapons for mass carnage from a local store in the hope the regularity doesn't set-off alarm bells or move in the social
circles where stolen, unregistered and homemade weapons were common?

If as some reports state, this was a general, semi-desultory act of accumulation where time is the only reason for the amount,
then how and why did Paddock arrive at a decision to kill and be 'lucky' enough to just happen to gathered a large amount of
weapons? One seems conveniently connected to the other.
Is this amount of firearms and ammunition normal -even for a gun enthusiast?

I hope someone can assist before my suggestions for Wallfire's intriguing questions.
Thank you.
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#4
The last time I bought a gun was back in the late 1970's, so the rules have changed since then.  I paid for mine, then the store owner filled out some paperwork that I had to take to get it registered, and that was that. No background check, that I knew about. 
But, like I said, times have changed since then, mostly after 9-11-01.

As for having a gun in the house with children, people seem to be divided in this area.  I think if small children are in the house, the gun should be locked up and stored in a safe place. 
I don't have any young children now, so mine stays real handy in the bedroom where I can grab it in the blink of an eye should a burglar be temped to enter. smallmachinegun




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#5
(10-06-2017, 09:42 AM)BIAD Wrote: I'm hoping fellow-members can enlighten us with how a firearm is acquired in general -as being a Brit, my knowledge is very
limited.

I'll give it a shot - no pun intended. Seriously, no pun intended! I just bought one yesterday evening, so the memory is fresh in my mind.

Quote:*If one walks into a Gun Store, how does it work...? What can you purchase and what legal documentation does one need?
Basically, what type of firearm can a person walk out of that store with and what level of purchase is officialdom then notified?

What can be purchased depends on the store. For example, the store I went to yesterday evening sells only "sporting" weapons - in my case, what, in these parts, is considered a "deer rifle" since deer season is fast approaching. In other locales it's considered a "sniper rifle", probably because those folks don't know what a deer looks like, but have frequent fantasies of shooting people. There are some sick puppies in our urban areas.

Anyhow, the store I shopped yesterday steadfastly refuses to sell hand guns or assault-type weapons. Another store I shopped recently specializes in those, albeit with a few "sporting" weapons thrown in the mix. Others are "Class III Dealers", who can transfer fully automatic weaponry. So what you can get depends on the store, and the locality. Some states ban everything to a stupid degree. California, Maryland, and New jersey, for examples. You'd be luck to buy a pop-gun there, and what you CAN get is crippled to a stupifying degree.

For legal documentation, I had to produce a state issued ID, like a Driver's License, a secondary form of ID (I used my Private Protective Services ID card for my secondary, as it is state issued and includes a photo), proof of address, and my telephone number. I had to fill out a series of forms, both Federal and State, and submit to a background check by the State Police. The background check had to be paid for separately. There is some silly law that it cannot go on the same receipt as the actual weapon.

Then, I had to wait while the background check was conducted. It was finished two minutes before the State Police investigation division closes up shop for the night. In other words, I waited a good long while.  The background check also involved a Federal NCIC check, and probably an FBI search as well. I'm not sure what all Federal areas were searched, but my fingerprints are already on file with the FBI because of my background.

Then I paid the cashier and was escorted from the store by a manager, who gave me the boxed rifle and my receipt outside the exit. I had to wait until I got home to put the bolt in the rifle. It came disassembled like that.

Quote:*Is it cultural enough that checking the safe storage of firearms and abundance of privately-owned guns isn't an act that a
Government department exists for?

No government department exists to check storage conditions (except Class III, full auto weapons - those are subject to unannounced pop inspections by ATF agents), but it is required by law that a lock to make the firearm disfunctional accompany every weapon sold. The last few I bought all came with cable locks, which can be run through the ejection port and the magazine well and locked, preventing the bolt from closing and locking.

No one checks for abundance at all, but records are kept. For example, in this state one can buy only two firearms a month. If one buys 3, he can expect a knock on the door from a man with a badge. At the federal level, two handguns bought in a 5 day period or less gets one put on the ATF radar, and they will be looking closely at you. Long guns such as rifles or shotguns don't draw the same attention for frequency of purchase.

Quote:*Are private sales monitored in some extent?

Nope. It is prudent, however, to retain a copy of any firearms purchase permits the buyer may have, and a signed bill of sale. In the case of full-auto Class II weapons, private sale is not legal at all. they have to be transferred by a Class II dealer, and their is about a metric ton of paperwork, background checks, odd taxes (a $200.00 "transfer tax"), and it takes forever and a day for the bureaucracy to get it through the system. Can't get one in any sort of hurry at all, legally.

Quote:*Are weapons that are deemed 'illegal' seen in general as an item that is only 'wrong' when in the hands of a maniac?

Nope, illegal is illegal, unless you are a government official - they can get away with quite a lot us plebeians cannot, However, possession of a weapon that some jackwagon THINKS is illegal - even if it isn't - will cause them to believe one to be a maniac despite the absence of any evidence to back that opinion up. In other words, it's not that they think you are a maniac with an illegal weapon, but rather they think you are a maniac BECAUSE you are armed. There is a subtle difference there. Without the weapon, you'd just be another Joe in their scheme of things.

Quote:*If it comes to light that a privately-bought gun was -at some time in it's history stolen, what protocols are in place to nuture
a honest approach to notifying authorities without bringing trouble to the unwitting buyer's door?

Ineffective ones. I had an assault rifle stolen a few years ago, and took my complaint all the way up the chain to the BATFE folks in Morgantown, West Virginia, which is their national records office. They were very interested that that particular weapon had gotten out into the wild unaccounted for, or so they said, but not interested enough to actually DO any goddamned thing about it at all - this despite thee fact that I told them exactly who had stolen it, and where they could recover it. They referred me to local law enforcement, said the request had to come on department letterhead before they would lift a finger. That was impractical, considering that the local investigator was in bed with the thief (quite literally, I am convinced), so no request was ever issued on department letterhead. Unfortunately for all concerned, I always pull the bolts out of my weapons when leaving the house, and carry them with me as a precaution, so some poor dumbass bought not only a stolen gun, but a non-functional and probably dangerous one. Bummer, huh? That particular gun was manufactured overseas, and importation of parts - like bolts - was illegal and therefore they never got it running. Sucks to be them. Moral of the story - don't buy stolen guns.

Anyhow, I did my part and notified the authorities. Not my problem if they sat on their asses and did nothing about it.

Quote:*What is the day-to-day perception of the average person in the US when it comes to having a handgun in the bedside drawer
or a rifle stored high up on a shelf in the garage?

I can't speak about the average person. My perception of a gun in a drawer is "useless". I keep one considerably more handy than that. Likewise on a shelf in the garage - it'll do me no good there at all if I need it. If a home invasion occurs while one is abed (because that's the most vulnerable time, and criminals LIKE vulnerable!), you need one NOW, not "wait a minute while I go get it" or "kindly hold back a second while I get this drawer open and rummage around for some cartridges".

Quote:I am ignorant of the illegal sales of ammunition and firearms and often wonder how an individual goes about hiding the
materials and information that he-or-she has illegally purchased.

Information - at the moment - isn't illegal here. Materials may be. It depends on location. For example, there are several places where one cannot buy magazines that hold more than 10 rounds. If I were in one of those places, I would just get what I wanted elsewhere and smuggle it back home. During the "Assault Weapons Ban of 1994", I decided one day that i wanted a 45 round magazine for a rifle I had, and just made it. Now, new manufacture of magazines of more than 10 round capacity was "illegal", but I checked with the BATFE and told them my plans. They said it was legal, because a) the two magazines I was making it from were already existent, not "new manufacture", and b) two existing high cap (30 round) magazines were being destroyed to form one (45 round) magazine, effectively taking one of them out of the gene pool, and they were fine with that.

I have to provide my birthdate to purchase ammo, but by now I look my age, so it's never questioned, nor am I required to show ID. If I were going to amass or stockpile ammunition, I would buy it 100 rounds at a time (because I was going to the range that week, and 100 rounds ain't jack for a day at the range), and do that religiously every week, at different stores. By the end of the year, i would have 5,200 rounds, and no one would have a clue where it was hidden. There are a lot of interesting schemes involving sealed PVC pipe and dessicants that would make it utterly impossible to find.

Quote:*Is it generally accepted socially that having the gun is far-more important than where it came from?

Socially, yes, that is the perception, but legally, they take a sharp interest in origins if you're caught up to no good with it. Some individuals want to know "where you got that thing" because they have an interest in getting one of the same.

Quote:*What are the thoughts -in general, of adults who own guns and have children in the same home as the weapons?

I don't know about in general, but I taught my kids. I'd go fill a plastic gallon jug with water, take them out with me and let them watch me shoot it. The water makes the jug explode spectacularly (because of the hydrostatic shock from a supersonic bullet traveling faster than mach), impressing them with just how dangerous guns are. Then I impressed upon them the doom in store for anyone ever touching one of my guns. They never did.

Quote:*Are the stored guns ready to use or are they dismantled to some degree?

For me, that depends on "stored". I remove the bolts from my weapons when I leave the house, and take the bolt with me, because I don't fancy me and the missus coming home one dark night and getting shot with my own gun. If you'll recall from above, that's already been disastrous for at least one thieving miscreant, so I still think it's a good idea. when I am home, however, they are locked, loaded, and ready to rock. they're not any good to me otherwise if the shit hits the fan and my door gets kicked inwards.

Quote:These questions may seem pompous considering the proliferation of gun crimes in poverty-ridden areas, but if we're to accept
the reported narrative of this elderly Mesquite resident... would a law-abiding millionaire with multiple properties and a private jet,
seek the weapons for mass carnage from a local store in the hope the regularity doesn't set-off alarm bells or move in the social
circles where stolen, unregistered and homemade weapons were common?

I can't answer that. I have suspicions where he got them, but no definitive proof, and as it turns out, the story being fed to the MSM is pointing anywhere but THERE, and developing as time goes by to take it even further away from "there".

Quote:If as some reports state, this was a general, semi-desultory act of accumulation where time is the only reason for the amount,
then how and why did Paddock arrive at a decision to kill and be 'lucky' enough to just happen to gathered a large amount of
weapons? One seems conveniently connected to the other.

The reports I'm getting is that he kicked his acquisition into high gear after last October. they are digging now to find some "event" in his world at that time that might have precipitated that rapid acquisition. I'm willing to bet they will "find" that reason, even if they have to make it up on the fly.

Quote:Is this amount of firearms and ammunition normal -even for a gun enthusiast?

"Enthusiast", yes. casual owner who just wants to say he has one, no. I once went to the range with some friends who had automatic weapons, and we ran out of linked belts for an M60 machine gun. A guy there with a .308 bolt action rifle had enough on hand that we linked up a few more 100 round belts with the used links from the other belts, because he wanted to try it out. He had a pile of ammo, and just a hand-operated bolt action rifle.

Quote:I hope someone can assist before my suggestions for Wallfire's intriguing questions.
Thank you.
............................................

I hope my answers have been some help to you.


.
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#6
(10-07-2017, 09:49 AM)Ninurta Wrote: ...I'll give it a shot - no pun intended. Seriously, no pun intended! I just bought one yesterday evening, so the memory is fresh in my mind.

I've read and re-read your posting and after attempting to interject a comment in each reply, I found
myself coming to a conclusion that covers all of your answers.
It's a tired one that has nothing to do with the calibre, range or speed of reloading... because:
Guns don't kill people, people do.

A Gun Store owner isn't in the business of selling weapons to crazy folk or 'normal' ones, he just sells
firearms.

The Swan and Fish community may comment that the fish-hooks he sells are dangerous, but I'd wager
the retailer doesn't assume every angler that comes into his establishment will deliberately wish to harm
birds or fish.
Although I'd guess if an Elk could lobby and vote, there'd be a politician who'd decry the sales of deer rifles
because any criminal antlered-creatures that roam Chicago are far-and-few between.
tinywondering

Does a bank-robber step through the Gun Store door and relate what he wants the gun for...? Of course not.


If a rifle is placed on the imaginary garage shelf or a handgun placed beside one's underwear in the metaphoric
bedside cabinet, does it wait until nightfall, book a room in Vegas and shoot the sh*t out of concert-goers...?
Nope.
tinywondering

I asked the question regarding safe storage of firearms, because after an incident in the UK, the system that
deals with weapons in the public domain finally decided that subtle lockers, containers in Gun Ranges and
other secure options, was the solution.
There's plenty of evidence to show how that's panning-out in the drug sales and robbery circles!
tinysure

So creating rules of banning certain weapons is a moot point really, as it's the person holding the firearm
that's the problem -said Captain Obvious...
...and since the United States holds a principle that states it's own Government demands the public of that
land should actually have firearms to repel the forces available to that Government, I believe this constant
political 'let's-get-rid-of-the-guns' screaming after a tragedy, stems from there.

The immigration argument, the gun outrage and divisive racial rant are all based on getting a US Government
to change one item... one specific established right written in the US Constitution and then the full overall can
begin.

It's not about some maniac firing an automatic-whatever from a hotel window and it's not about white males
dominating someone of colour, Its not about what defines a citizen of the United States and an illegal invader,
it's about breaking the masses' basic perception of what it country is.

Kiki Dee once sang a line from a 1974 song "If something gets in my way, I go round it" and I believe that's
what is going on here. Every time an idiot fires a weapon with intent to kill humans -whether it's staged or not,
a political lecture is broadcast about ridding the country of a fundamental right to protect themselves.

It seems that this careful erosion has been attempted for a long time and yet, a President and all the
officials who make up the US structure of governance, are only there for a limited time.
So who keeps shouting in the wind for this disarming?

It's possible that some black-garbed military group may break down a citizen's door, safe in the knowledge
that there's no weapons to defend themselves against a country-wide takeover. Just as it's possible that such
liberal 'let's play nice' Eloi-style civilisation will never be troubled by the Morlocks.

But keeping a weapon to defend oneself and forever being wrong is far-better than being defenceless
against an unknown enemy and being right.
You can't do nuthin' when you're dead.

Cheers Ninurta.
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