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Quakes Close to Columbia, SC
#1
I was born and raised around this area. We never had quakes of any kind. I even lived near the quarry. 

Quote:Tectonic Summary
This June 29 M3.6 Elgin, South Carolina, earthquake is part of an ongoing sequence in central South Carolina. The sequence started on December 27, 2021, with an M3.3 earthquake near Lugoff, South Carolina. Between December 27, 2021, and June 29, 2022, there have been about 40 earthquakes in this sequence spanning M1.3 to M3.6. Five of the earthquakes were M3.0 or larger and were widely felt. The earthquakes have occurred at shallow depths of 7 km or less. Shaking from earthquakes in the eastern U.S. extends to greater distances from the epicenter than earthquakes of similar magnitudes in the western U. S. due to different geological conditions. These two factors have led to these earthquakes being widely felt. Several of these earthquakes have over 3000 associated “Did You Feel It?” reports of felt shaking, but the shaking reported has not been at intensities that typically lead to damage.
Earthquakes are not uncommon in the vicinity of the 2021-2022 South Carolina sequence, but having a sequence of about 40 earthquakes in such a short time is unusual. Many earthquakes of similar magnitudes have occurred in the eastern U.S., but it is extremely rare for them to be foreshocks to much larger earthquakes. This swarm will continue for an unknown length of time, and if it stops it may resume sometime in the future.
The largest earthquake in the region of this sequence was the M4.8 1913 Union County, SC, earthquake about 90 km to the northwest. Earthquakes have occurred periodically around the Monticello Reservoir ~30 km west of the 2021-2022 sequence since the 1970s, but the current earthquakes do not appear to be related to the reservoir. The 2021-2022 sequence is additionally located ~140 km northwest of the ~M7 1886 Charleston earthquake. The 2021-2022 sequence is not associated with the seismic zone of the 1886 earthquake.
https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/.../executive

I have been seeing multiple reports of quakes from people down there. This shit is NOT common ! 

Quote: Several of the earthquakes have been felt, as is common for even small magnitude earthquakes in the eastern United States. None of the earthquakes so far have produced shaking intensities where damage to buildings is expected.

- Small magnitude earthquakes like these are relatively common in South Carolina, although the number of earthquakes in the time span of the current sequence is unusual.
- This earthquake sequence is not related to the region of seismicity associated with the great 1886 Charleston earthquake.
- In October 2021 there was a series of seven earthquakes, some felt, near Jenkinsville, South Carolina and the Monticello Reservoir. The current earthquake sequence does not appear to be related to those earthquakes.
-There are no oil or gas operations in these crystalline Piedmont rocks where these earthquakes occurred, so the earthquakes are not the result of oil and gas production.
The Truth is Out There, Somewhere
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#2
I was going to mention the New Madrid Fault, however, that's pretty far to the west. Sounds like a different fault line. We have a few in Michigan, but those are more like extensions of the New Madrid lines as we are in the moderate to low damage seismic zone and have had some small quakes in my lifetime. The western half of SC is in the low seismic zone of the NMFL.
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#3
(06-30-2022, 09:57 AM)kdog Wrote: I was born and raised around this area. We never had quakes of any kind. I even lived near the quarry. 

Quote:Tectonic Summary
This June 29 M3.6 Elgin, South Carolina, earthquake is part of an ongoing sequence in central South Carolina. The sequence started on December 27, 2021, with an M3.3 earthquake near Lugoff, South Carolina. Between December 27, 2021, and June 29, 2022, there have been about 40 earthquakes in this sequence spanning M1.3 to M3.6. Five of the earthquakes were M3.0 or larger and were widely felt. The earthquakes have occurred at shallow depths of 7 km or less. Shaking from earthquakes in the eastern U.S. extends to greater distances from the epicenter than earthquakes of similar magnitudes in the western U. S. due to different geological conditions. These two factors have led to these earthquakes being widely felt. Several of these earthquakes have over 3000 associated “Did You Feel It?” reports of felt shaking, but the shaking reported has not been at intensities that typically lead to damage.
Earthquakes are not uncommon in the vicinity of the 2021-2022 South Carolina sequence, but having a sequence of about 40 earthquakes in such a short time is unusual. Many earthquakes of similar magnitudes have occurred in the eastern U.S., but it is extremely rare for them to be foreshocks to much larger earthquakes. This swarm will continue for an unknown length of time, and if it stops it may resume sometime in the future.
The largest earthquake in the region of this sequence was the M4.8 1913 Union County, SC, earthquake about 90 km to the northwest. Earthquakes have occurred periodically around the Monticello Reservoir ~30 km west of the 2021-2022 sequence since the 1970s, but the current earthquakes do not appear to be related to the reservoir. The 2021-2022 sequence is additionally located ~140 km northwest of the ~M7 1886 Charleston earthquake. The 2021-2022 sequence is not associated with the seismic zone of the 1886 earthquake.
https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/.../executive

I have been seeing multiple reports of quakes from people down there. This shit is NOT common ! 

Quote: Several of the earthquakes have been felt, as is common for even small magnitude earthquakes in the eastern United States. None of the earthquakes so far have produced shaking intensities where damage to buildings is expected.

- Small magnitude earthquakes like these are relatively common in South Carolina, although the number of earthquakes in the time span of the current sequence is unusual.
- This earthquake sequence is not related to the region of seismicity associated with the great 1886 Charleston earthquake.
- In October 2021 there was a series of seven earthquakes, some felt, near Jenkinsville, South Carolina and the Monticello Reservoir. The current earthquake sequence does not appear to be related to those earthquakes.
-There are no oil or gas operations in these crystalline Piedmont rocks where these earthquakes occurred, so the earthquakes are not the result of oil and gas production.

Notice how so many of these reports of obvious Theabnormalities are always dressed as "common occurrences".

If it is so common, why is it worthy of reporting on?

Ask anyone that has lived in the area for more than 70 years and they will tell you, "It is something that never happened here, as long as I have been here."

Even once every seventy years is not common.

They love pissing on our heads, and telling us it is raining.

Then they expect us to trust them.
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#4
(06-30-2022, 09:57 AM)kdog Wrote: I was born and raised around this area. We never had quakes of any kind.

Funny ... my brother called me from Florida to tell me about this.  An hour later my wife told me to come look at it in her news feed.

What's up with this?
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#5
(06-30-2022, 02:06 PM)Snarl Wrote:
(06-30-2022, 09:57 AM)kdog Wrote: I was born and raised around this area. We never had quakes of any kind.

Funny ... my brother called me from Florida to tell me about this.  An hour later my wife told me to come look at it in her news feed.

What's up with this?

You are not the only one asking this question.

It seems this has been going on for quite a while, increasing in numbers, since around December last year.

But it got me to thinking. A long while back, I remember discussion going around the boards about, DUMBs and other underground tunnels and constructions, causing this phenomenon in other places.

I know that some other countries have built underground cities in preparation for whatever wicked thing this way comes. Maybe the US is playing catch up. Of course there will only be room for the wealthy, the obedient, and the compliant, so I know there will be no safe space for me.
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#6
The difference between earthquakes being common and people commonly feeling those earthquakes is a pretty wide gap. Earthquakes are pretty common here, but no one hardly ever feels them. I have a fault line running directly below my house, which is a little worrisome because I also have a coal mine running directly beneath my house, and a good hard shake might collapse the mine and drop my house into the resulting sinkhole. The mine already destroyed my well by cutting the bottom out of it during mining operations, resulting in a hollow tube that no longer holds water.

While I live directly above a fault line, and while earthquakes are fairly common, I have only ever felt ONE earthquake here - and it wasn't very strong, just barely perceptible to sensitive folks.

I've also noticed your location seems to determine whether you feel an earthquake or not. When the east coast quake hit in 2012 (I think, but it may have been 2011) I was a couple hundred miles from the epicenter, but we felt it. My missus at the time ran into the living room where I was snoozing on the sofa all panicky asking "what is that?/", and I just opened one eye and said "relax, it's just an earthquake" and went back to sleep. It was noticeable because we were indoors. People in the same general area at that time told me they felt nothing, and I noticed that all those folks who felt nothing were outdoors. Same quake, different experiences of it depending on whether you were indoors or outdoors.

In the early 1990's, and earthquake struck here in this area where I live now that was felt all the way to north-central NC, where I was living at the time. I was at work on a warehouse loading dock as the dock foreman, and did not feel the quake as I was outdoors, but I did notice that all the vehicles backed up to the dock rocked a little bit forward and then back to their original position, which was curious to me because I did not feel anything. When I got home that evening, the news had a report of the quake, and that explained it to me.

Bottom line, there are places where earthquakes are fairly common, and no one but the seismologists ever know that they are happening.

.
Diogenes was eating bread and lentils for supper. He was seen by the philosopher Aristippus, who lived comfortably by flattering the king.

Said Aristippus, ‘If you would learn to be subservient to the king you would not have to live on lentils.’ Said Diogenes, ‘Learn to live on lentils and you will not have to be subservient to the king.’


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#7
(06-30-2022, 03:59 PM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote: You are not the only one asking this question.

It seems this has been going on for quite a while, increasing in numbers, since around December last year.

But it got me to thinking. A long while back, I remember discussion going around the boards about, DUMBs and other underground tunnels and constructions, causing this phenomenon in other places.

I know that some other countries have built underground cities in preparation for whatever wicked thing this way comes. Maybe the US is playing catch up. Of course there will only be room for the wealthy, the obedient, and the compliant, so I know there will be no safe space for me.

I don't think they are digging and building DUMBs there, too close to the coast for all that. Epicenters not too far from Kdog's parents and just a few hours from our youngest daughter. In fact there were earthquakes of similar magnitude in the same area around this time last year right after she moved back down there, as well as multiple fireball sightings (she was witness to a few of them).

Back in 1886 there was a huge earthquake that destroyed most of Charleston, the largest ever recorded in the southeastern US.

Linky
"As an American it's your responsibility to have your own strategic duck stockpile. You can't expect the government to do it for you." - the dork I call one of my mom's other kids
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#8
(06-30-2022, 06:46 PM)Ninurta Wrote: The difference between earthquakes being common and people commonly feeling those earthquakes is a pretty wide gap.

Felt one (sorta) in California. The shake effects from that one were awesome!!

Heard one in Seoul, Korea. Just a loud crack (like a gunshot) but so much louder.  Was looking out the window when it happened and saw the air shimmer too. Didn't know it was an earthquake until my wife saw it reported on the news.
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