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Merchandise and Food Shortages in a National Crisis
https://t.me/TheConspiracyHole/32093

3,000 cattle suddenly fell dead last weekend in Kansas

According to the farmers, there is no plausible explanation for this. Final death numbers continue to come in are now at 10,000.

Source
в ближайшем будущем во всем мире  потребление сильно упадет (включая сокращение продуктов питания)  ... Кто будет возражать -  будуть  закрывать рот силой...  Причем аргументация будет -   экологической... Разумная земля (природа, ноосфера) - важнее человека...

28 07 19|14 = 68
01 09 19|39 = 68
24 02 20|22 = 68
I need to figure out what does 68 means
Reply
(06-14-2022, 10:25 PM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote: Didn't the Fed just raise interest as a sledgehammer approach to stop us from being able to afford to buy anything, to stop the run away train of inflation? 

I against they will stop inflation in it's tracks, when there is nothing to buy, and no one can afford to buy anything.

I may be wrong, about their reasons for putting us in a strangle hold, because I can't make sense out of any of this.

Unless they just want us all dead.

Weimar republic part deux? I seriously doubt they want us "all" dead, otherwise they would cease to exist, but yea I feel your point. Perhaps a clandestine/covert eugenics program hitting us simultaneously from all angles to weed out the weak while at same time demoralizing us and changing the culture to have more obedient slave race. Those left still standing will simply submit due to exhaustion and will accept their solution which of course only works in their favor. The current day cannon fodder of MK zombies will soon be dropped like a sack of rotting potatoes once the PSYWAR funding from technocrat billionaires like Soros & the elitist Club of demons (Rome) is halted.

The irony is these evil twisted elites preach "sustainability" from their ivory towers to us 24/7 and yet it's all the exact opposite...their continuous carpet bombing of methods & tactics to change the world for the so-called betterment of humanity is Unsustainable!

It will be interesting to see how the Op changes, morphs into something else after elections, especially if the GOP takes the House. We'll then know if the GOP is just an arm of the Dem parasitic party.
"The underlying aim was not to win the war but to use the conflict to create a constant state of destabilized perception in order to manage and control." ― Vladislav Yuryevich Surkov

JFK to 9/11: Everything Is a Rich Man's Trick




Reply
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article...-port.html
в ближайшем будущем во всем мире  потребление сильно упадет (включая сокращение продуктов питания)  ... Кто будет возражать -  будуть  закрывать рот силой...  Причем аргументация будет -   экологической... Разумная земля (природа, ноосфера) - важнее человека...

28 07 19|14 = 68
01 09 19|39 = 68
24 02 20|22 = 68
I need to figure out what does 68 means
Reply
(06-15-2022, 02:38 PM)SimeonJ Wrote: From unknown source, i didn't checked it but i think its the short list:
An updated list of USA-based destroyed Food Manufacturing Plants

The source for that or perhaps The source comes from the Gateway Pundit...so YMMV. My energy level is too low to fact check that laundry list, but we know some of those fires did in fact happen.

So, we all been following the destruction of food plants in the USA under the Let's Go Brandon regime, AKA the Bidenenko regime, AKA the Bai-den-owes-China-big-time misadministration, you'll know something very strange is going on. Stranger things and IT both shines and stinks, like so much else about about this failure of a presidency and a fragile of a man. In fact, if one gets right down to it, the story is beyond the "Coincidence Rule."

In case you don't recall what the "Coincidence Rule" is, it's this: one occasion of "something fishy" happening is an anomaly, two is a coincidence, but three is a pattern. But if three or more is a pattern, we are way beyond "pattern" territory and well into "Clinton-Body-Count-almost-a-certainty" territory, as the actuarial and statistical chances of all this being "coincidence" and "accident" would seem to approach zero.

Perhaps like in Dinesh D'Souza's 2000 Mules docu a similar investigative method could be done in the case of these destroyed food processing plants.? On the surface, in my opinion, this is a deliberate pattern of destruction.

Also, based on personal experience in the US Navy, the quickest way to demoralize a crew (a population) is poor and/or lack of food. People will literally do, sacrifice & accept anything (solution) to have food. Keep an eye on the fake meat/fake food, GMO, nano particle soylent green marketing bonanza.

Hope for the best, but plan for the worse; chance favors the prepared mind & soul.

[Image: hrxd4s5.jpg]

[Image: J2YeN5K.jpg]


8 predictions for the world in 2030 (WEF predictions from 2016):

Quote:1. All products will have become services. “I don't own anything. I don't own a car. I don't own a house. I don't own any appliances or any clothes,”...

2. There is a global price on carbon.

3. US dominance is over. We have a handful of global powers.

4. Farewell hospital, hello home-spital. Technology will have further disrupted disease, writes Melanie Walker, a medical doctor and World Bank advisor. The hospital as we know it will be on its way out...

5. We are eating much less meat. Rather like our grandparents, we will treat meat as a treat rather than a staple...

6. Today’s Syrian refugees will be 2030’s CEOs. (1300+ CEOs left in 2019)

7. The values that built the West will have been tested to breaking point.

8. “By the 2030s, we'll be ready to move humans toward the Red Planet.” What’s more, once we get there, we’ll probably discover evidence of alien life, writes Ellen Stofan, Chief Scientist at NASA.
"The underlying aim was not to win the war but to use the conflict to create a constant state of destabilized perception in order to manage and control." ― Vladislav Yuryevich Surkov

JFK to 9/11: Everything Is a Rich Man's Trick




Reply
I know what will happen. I have read the book of revelations when i was like 7 years old or something :). I come from very religious Christian Orthodox family.
PS you better read the Buddhist book of the death to be prepared.
в ближайшем будущем во всем мире  потребление сильно упадет (включая сокращение продуктов питания)  ... Кто будет возражать -  будуть  закрывать рот силой...  Причем аргументация будет -   экологической... Разумная земля (природа, ноосфера) - важнее человека...

28 07 19|14 = 68
01 09 19|39 = 68
24 02 20|22 = 68
I need to figure out what does 68 means
Reply
(06-16-2022, 12:54 AM)SimeonJ Wrote: I know what will happen. I have read the book of revelations when i was like 7 years old or something :). I come from very religious Christian Orthodox family.
PS you better read the Buddhist book of the death to be prepared.

I think the monkey pox comes close to fitting the bill, for one of them at least.


Quote:[/url][url=https://biblehub.com/csb/revelation/16.htm]Christian Standard Bible

The first went and poured out his bowl on the earth, and severely painful sores broke out on the people who had the mark of the beast and who worshiped its image.

I couldn't resist.
tinycool
[Image: attachment.php?aid=8192]




Reply
1972 newspaper article...The next narrative?:

[Image: lpVKKSw.jpg]

Snipped from
The Fort Scott Tribune - May 13, 1972


Causes of inflation according to the Biden Misadministration:

[Image: hxAgqv2.jpg]
"The underlying aim was not to win the war but to use the conflict to create a constant state of destabilized perception in order to manage and control." ― Vladislav Yuryevich Surkov

JFK to 9/11: Everything Is a Rich Man's Trick




Reply
(06-16-2022, 12:54 AM)SimeonJ Wrote: I know what will happen. I have read the book of revelations when i was like 7 years old or something :). I come from very religious Christian Orthodox family.
PS you better read the Buddhist book of the death to be prepared.

The Book of Revelation is hard to understand esp. at such a young age. I believe I first read that when I was around 11 years old and was fascinated with the imagery, but understood none of it really.

As a guide, it's also hard to understand as I believe that the signs are not quite in sequence and have to be understood based on the symbology and the times back then. The New Testament has some good predictions from Christ himself and the Old Testament Book of Daniel has some good prophecies as well that align with the others.

Not sure how Buddha figures into this, but I haven't studied much of his stuff. I believe that everything we need is in the New Testament in the quotes of Jesus even though I'm not big on the apostles (like the Book of Acts), they were always questioning Jesus and didn't seem to get his messages all the time.
Reply
(05-23-2022, 11:49 PM)NightskyeB4Dawn Wrote:
(05-23-2022, 10:39 PM)Bally002 Wrote: Nice comment.  Spring is the better time for birds at night here, the Pheasant Coucal with it's continuous 'woop woop'  mating call going all night, owls, wagtails, plovers and other life in the trees.  Goes throughout summer too but this year with never ending rain very little is heard.
The Butcher birds, Magpies, Satin Bower birds and parrots still meet us each morning on the back verandah (drying off) for a feed and later in the day.  Lately there's a lot and fights start and we laugh when we watch the top tier birds chase the others away and the minors swoop in for a quick pick.  It doesn't end there though as the crows take to the smaller birds in flight carrying a bit of food attempting to make them drop it and so it continues for about an hour.  Of course the chooks and goose patrol the ground and scavenge up the crumbs and the pecking order goes on in that dimension.
During the day the Butcher birds and Kookaburras follow us as we split wood, perch on the periphery, and go for the grubs and wood insects as each log is split open.  Some good sights at times.  The birds alert us to any snakes and lizards nearby when they change their tones and dive at the reptiles location.  
One sight I saw, which I think maybe unusual, was when a Peregrine Falcon hit the large white goose in the back yard.  White feathers everywhere but the old goose just got up, flapped and hissed.  The falcon flew up onto the roof guttering shaking it's head looking dazed.  I am not sure of a falcon's perspective and I know they are fast but attacking another bird perhaps three times it's size may me wonder how the 'F' it would carry the goose away.  The were several chickens about at the time which would have made easier targets.  Anyway the falcon then flew up into a tree, meanwhile the chickens huddled under the house but the old goose just continued on as if nothing had happened.
Another sight is the flocks of wood ducks on the property.  Have never seen so many.  They cover the yard and dams at times.  Might be the wet weather.  Lots of little ones hatching.  Making me think I'll restock the dams with fish and yabbies.  
Kind regards,
Bally :)

Not to derail MSB's thread, but your post reminded me of the time, about twenty years ago. I was on the back porch, talking to the water guy. I was pointing to where the well is, when all of the sudden this hawk swooped down and tried to pluck a squirrel from the side of a tree. The tree was right behind the well, so we got a grand view of the whole thing.

He was either young, had poor sight, gauged wrong, or was drunk. He caught the squirrel, but it got away, after he knocked himself out by hitting the tree. He was out for only a couple of seconds, and flew off, minus one squirrel, dazed, and with a headache.

I always smile when people talk about how quiet it as to be living in the woods. They have obviously never spent any time in the woods, because quiet it is not. The only time it is quiet is when danger is around.

When it rains the fifty different varieties of frogs hold a concert, and they battle for the title of "The Finest Frog Group In The Woods".

It is loud, Damn loud.


You present a nice personal story that does relate to the thread. The natural balance of nature is most stable when humans stop interfering. The environment settles into a rhythm, something the deer hunters call a pattern. That natural pattern changes when firearm deer season comes around. The deer change their habits to avoid the hunters that invade the woods that time of year.

Now expand that concept to entire populations of game animals after hungry people are over hunting an area. I read an interesting article in a hunting magazine that talked about the disappearance of white tailed deer in some mid western states during the depression in the 1930s. Poor game management with little enforcement of the laws drove surviving animals into a perpetual state of altered patterns. It wasn't until the 1970s or later before the deer came back and could be hunted again. Not all animals get hunted out under that type of pressure, but they change habits to the point you will have a huge problem trying to hunt them. I believe the same thing can happen to wild edible plants as well, except on a different time scale. If people eat up most of the edible weeds in their area, common weeds will become hard to find after awhile.
Reply
(06-17-2022, 02:10 PM)Michigan Swamp Buck Wrote: You present a nice personal story that does relate to the thread. The natural balance of nature is most stable when humans stop interfering. The environment settles into a rhythm, something the deer hunters call a pattern. That natural pattern changes when firearm deer season comes around. The deer change their habits to avoid the hunters that invade the woods that time of year.

Now expand that concept to entire populations of game animals after hungry people are over hunting an area. A read an interesting article in a hunting magazine that talked about the disappearance of white tailed deer in some mid western states during the depression in the 1930s. Poor game management with little enforcement of the laws drove surviving animals into a perpetual state of altered patterns. It wasn't until the 1970s or later before the deer came back and could be hunted again. Not all animals get hunted out under that type of pressure, but they change habits to the point you will have a huge problem trying to hunt them. I believe the same thing can happen to wild edible plants as well, except on a different time scale. If people eat up most of the edible weeds in their area, common weeds will become hard to find after awhile.

Valid points. When I was younger, you really had to HUNT to find a deer both here and in West Virginia. sure, they were still there, but they didn't make it easy to find them, and had the space per animal to accomplish that. Now the place is eat up with them. in 2010, I went for a visit in WV, and saw a herd of 20-25 deer, in broad daylight, grazing in a river bottom beside the road. On a 3 mile ride between one house and another, I saw 9 deer in the woods. Here, I have seen a doe, twice, down by my bridge, in full view of the house in broad daylight, and a small herd of 5 deer makes a regular pilgrimage through the area between my house and the neighboring house between 7:30 and 8:00 am every morning. last week, I saw a small yearling doe not 20 feet off of my back deck, grazing under a big old white pine without a care in the world.

At my last house in the next county over, whenever I got ready for work in the morning I would fix a cup of coffee and go outside to watch the deer grazing in my yard. And this was an every morning thing. So, at the moment, there are plenty of deer here, but the coming crunch will likely thin them out considerably, and the human population hunting them will be considerably larger than the Depression population.

It's not just deer - bears and other wildlife have made a stunning comeback over the past few years. When i was younger, I saw exactly two bears (plus one skeleton of a bear) in the entire time I was growing up here. Now they are all over the place. A momma bear with two cubs was seen at my bridge the day I moved in here, and the crows tell on them as they move through the woods.  Grace saw a momma bear with one single, nearly grown, cub up close and personal during a half mile walk from our former house and back. The bears were on one side of the road, and she passed them on the other. The bears just stood there and stared, like they couldn't believe what they were seeing. There are so many bears here now that it's a requirement to bear-proof trash can pickup points.

What I worry most for is the elk herd. Elk were extinct here for nearly 200 years, and only recently made a come back with a few migrating over from Kentucky and re-establishing themselves here. Last I heard, there were about 500 Elk in the herd which gathers up in summer and then disperses into smaller groups to forage in the winter. That may sound like a lot, but 500 Elk would go pretty quick if everyone is hunting them.

If I were going to rely on hunting, I'd probably concentrate on small game, like rabbits, squirrels, and groundhogs. They're smaller, and so will keep you busier hunting them, but they are also more numerous and easier to find, as well as repopulating a lot quicker with multiple births as opposed to the single or double births of larger game, and they reach maturity quicker. another plus is that I won't be in competition with all the Nimrods out there hunting the bigger stuff to fill their larders faster. Their way may produce more meat in the short term, but my way is more sustainable over time.

Regarding wild plant forage, this area has reverted more to the wild since I was younger, meaning a lot more forageable plants. On the other side of the scales, there are fewer people left here who still know what you can eat vs. what will kill you, so they will likely get thinned out somewhat, too, when they start trying to forage.

Here is a photo I took recently on a ride back down the the area I was raised in, showing a doe grazing in someone's yard in broad daylight, in the afternoon. When I stopped the car and got out for the picture, she paid no attention to me at all:

[Image: attachment.php?aid=11540]

Back when I was younger, the deer would hide in the woods all day, and only come out to graze in open fields after sundown. You could often find them hiding in the edge of the woodline waiting on dark to fall. Now, broad daylight grazing in wide open spaces is a regular thing.

.


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
Diogenes was eating bread and lentils for supper. He was seen by the philosopher Aristippus, who lived comfortably by flattering the king.

Said Aristippus, ‘If you would learn to be subservient to the king you would not have to live on lentils.’ Said Diogenes, ‘Learn to live on lentils and you will not have to be subservient to the king.’


Reply
Reply to Ninurta,

The family owned this property since around 1978, a few years after it was lumbered for elm. The trees there were fairly old by then and by the time I moved there it was a pretty mature forest. The strange thing is (maybe not so strange) that in the late 70s there was deer up the wazoo with hunting pressure like you wouldn't believe back then. I think it was in the late 80s the state of Michigan began giving out doe permits like they were free candy. I believe it was due to pressure from the insurance industry. After a few years the local herd was thinned down so badly, we never got the numbers of hunters up here like before. The pressure continues to this day and deer are not that plentiful plus they are much smaller in size at maturity.

I've had the property logged 3 times since I've lived here and with all those trees gone, the wildlife has exploded in diversity making it a far better property for small game and the predators that hunt them. Deer frolic with our pet animals in the yard, bear walk up the drive in broad daylight to gab a snack at the bird feeders, a sand hill crane of all animals was in the yard one year. The squirrels aren't as numerous now, but rabbits, ground hogs, and other wildlife are here and the wildflowers, forbs and berry bushes are all over the place as well. I still see sensitive species here with bugs and spiders of all kinds that I believe some have not even been identified yet. That reminds me, I need to evict that black widow from the garden before it lays eggs soon.
Reply
(06-17-2022, 06:16 PM)Ninurta Wrote:
(06-17-2022, 02:10 PM)Michigan Swamp Buck Wrote: You present a nice personal story that does relate to the thread. The natural balance of nature is most stable when humans stop interfering. The environment settles into a rhythm, something the deer hunters call a pattern. That natural pattern changes when firearm deer season comes around. The deer change their habits to avoid the hunters that invade the woods that time of year.

Now expand that concept to entire populations of game animals after hungry people are over hunting an area. A read an interesting article in a hunting magazine that talked about the disappearance of white tailed deer in some mid western states during the depression in the 1930s. Poor game management with little enforcement of the laws drove surviving animals into a perpetual state of altered patterns. It wasn't until the 1970s or later before the deer came back and could be hunted again. Not all animals get hunted out under that type of pressure, but they change habits to the point you will have a huge problem trying to hunt them. I believe the same thing can happen to wild edible plants as well, except on a different time scale. If people eat up most of the edible weeds in their area, common weeds will become hard to find after awhile.

Valid points. When I was younger, you really had to HUNT to find a deer both here and in West Virginia. sure, they were still there, but they didn't make it easy to find them, and had the space per animal to accomplish that. Now the place is eat up with them. in 2010, I went for a visit in WV, and saw a herd of 20-25 deer, in broad daylight, grazing in a river bottom beside the road. On a 3 mile ride between one house and another, I saw 9 deer in the woods. Here, I have seen a doe, twice, down by my bridge, in full view of the house in broad daylight, and a small herd of 5 deer makes a regular pilgrimage through the area between my house and the neighboring house between 7:30 and 8:00 am every morning. last week, I saw a small yearling doe not 20 feet off of my back deck, grazing under a big old white pine without a care in the world.

At my last house in the next county over, whenever I got ready for work in the morning I would fix a cup of coffee and go outside to watch the deer grazing in my yard. And this was an every morning thing. So, at the moment, there are plenty of deer here, but the coming crunch will likely thin them out considerably, and the human population hunting them will be considerably larger than the Depression population.

It's not just deer - bears and other wildlife have made a stunning comeback over the past few years. When i was younger, I saw exactly two bears (plus one skeleton of a bear) in the entire time I was growing up here. Now they are all over the place. A momma bear with two cubs was seen at my bridge the day I moved in here, and the crows tell on them as they move through the woods.  Grace saw a momma bear with one single, nearly grown, cub up close and personal during a half mile walk from our former house and back. The bears were on one side of the road, and she passed them on the other. The bears just stood there and stared, like they couldn't believe what they were seeing. There are so many bears here now that it's a requirement to bear-proof trash can pickup points.

What I worry most for is the elk herd. Elk were extinct here for nearly 200 years, and only recently made a come back with a few migrating over from Kentucky and re-establishing themselves here. Last I heard, there were about 500 Elk in the herd which gathers up in summer and then disperses into smaller groups to forage in the winter. That may sound like a lot, but 500 Elk would go pretty quick if everyone is hunting them.

If I were going to rely on hunting, I'd probably concentrate on small game, like rabbits, squirrels, and groundhogs. They're smaller, and so will keep you busier hunting them, but they are also more numerous and easier to find, as well as repopulating a lot quicker with multiple births as opposed to the single or double births of larger game, and they reach maturity quicker. another plus is that I won't be in competition with all the Nimrods out there hunting the bigger stuff to fill their larders faster. Their way may produce more meat in the short term, but my way is more sustainable over time.

Regarding wild plant forage, this area has reverted more to the wild since I was younger, meaning a lot more forageable plants. On the other side of the scales, there are fewer people left here who still know what you can eat vs. what will kill you, so they will likely get thinned out somewhat, too, when they start trying to forage.

Here is a photo I took recently on a ride back down the the area I was raised in, showing a doe grazing in someone's yard in broad daylight, in the afternoon. When I stopped the car and got out for the picture, she paid no attention to me at all:

[Image: attachment.php?aid=11540]

Back when I was younger, the deer would hide in the woods all day, and only come out to graze in open fields after sundown. You could often find them hiding in the edge of the woodline waiting on dark to fall. Now, broad daylight grazing in wide open spaces is a regular thing.

.

I grew up near the water. Fish, clams, and crabs, were plentiful, but we had strict rules about what you could take and when.

Even as children we were taught you never took a female crab, and you never took a fish or a crab under a certain size.

You did not hunt certain animals out of season, and we did not need any officials watching over you.

We did what was right, because our lives depended on it.

Respect for life will be the first thing to go.

Your life, mine, and any other living thing will be forfeit.
[Image: attachment.php?aid=8192]




Reply
https://www.zeemaps.com/view?group=44108...59004&z=14
An interactive map of the production plants which were destroyed
в ближайшем будущем во всем мире  потребление сильно упадет (включая сокращение продуктов питания)  ... Кто будет возражать -  будуть  закрывать рот силой...  Причем аргументация будет -   экологической... Разумная земля (природа, ноосфера) - важнее человека...

28 07 19|14 = 68
01 09 19|39 = 68
24 02 20|22 = 68
I need to figure out what does 68 means
Reply
The trucking industry and supply chains are about to take another HUGE hit. You might remember a few years ago when Uber and Lyft drivers started demanding benefits and California passed AB5 in 2019.

The California Trucking Association appealed and has been fighting it since then with injunctions granted and lawsuits delaying it, until now. The US Supreme Court just denied an appeal to delay implementation.

An estimated 70k owner operator truckers in California are classified as independent contractors. They have 7 days to cease operations as independent contractors. This will affect all shipping coming out of the ports in California and food.

California trucking prepares for shake-up under independent contractor law AB5
"The underlying aim was not to win the war but to use the conflict to create a constant state of destabilized perception in order to manage and control." ― Vladislav Yuryevich Surkov

JFK to 9/11: Everything Is a Rich Man's Trick




Reply
(07-03-2022, 03:04 AM)EndtheMadnessNow Wrote: The trucking industry and supply chains are about to take another HUGE hit. You might remember a few years ago when Uber and Lyft drivers started demanding benefits and California passed AB5 in 2019.

The California Trucking Association appealed and has been fighting it since then with injunctions granted and lawsuits delaying it, until now. The US Supreme Court just denied an appeal to delay implementation.

An estimated 70k owner operator truckers in California are classified as independent contractors. They have 7 days to cease operations as independent contractors. This will affect all shipping coming out of the ports in California and food.

California trucking prepares for shake-up under independent contractor law AB5

That sucks in the short term, but may work itself out in the long term, to California's detriment. If folks realize they can no longer get, or else have to wait interminable times to get, stuff from China and other Pacific points, they will likely stop sending orders for what they can't get. China and other Pacific points will them either have to stop shipping to ports in California, or risk losing business, so, they will likely find other ports. It may take a year or two, but the supply chain will eventually sort itself out in ways like that.

Business goes where business is wanted.

Other businesses are deserting California now like rats leaving a sinking ship. We may just have to add independent trucking and cargo shipment to that list.

I won't work for a union shop on principle. Matter of fact, if I find a "union made" label on a product, I won't even buy it. So I understand the independent trucker's desire to remain free and not under the teamster's thumb. Those 70,000 independent truckers should be aware that they are needed at other points in the nation desperately. If California doesn't want them, they can always leave the dead to bury the dead in California, and move on to greener pastures where free men still live. Truckers are in short supply everywhere right now, and fuel is cheaper everywhere other than California, too, now that California has had that massive fuel tax increase that just went into effect.

It might be time to move onward to a Free State, like many other former Californians and businesses are currently doing. Leave California in the dust to finish rotting on it's own.

.
Diogenes was eating bread and lentils for supper. He was seen by the philosopher Aristippus, who lived comfortably by flattering the king.

Said Aristippus, ‘If you would learn to be subservient to the king you would not have to live on lentils.’ Said Diogenes, ‘Learn to live on lentils and you will not have to be subservient to the king.’


Reply
From this lengthy 2019 Asia Times article it seems the Sri Lankan crisis may be a part of this "Free and Open Indo-Pacific" campaign by the US government.

Quote:Resistance to US intervention in Sri Lanka

Exerting control over the South Asian island state by turning it into a ‘military logistics hub’ has become a top strategic priority for Washington

Sri Lanka is a participant in the Maritime Belt and Silk Road Initiative, China’s extensive network of ports and maritime facilities connecting the Pacific and Indian Oceans. In a controversial move in January 2017, the Sri Lankan government granted China a 99-year lease of Hambantota Port in exchange for US$1.1 billion in debt relief. China is also developing other projects in Sri Lanka, such as the $1.4 billion “Port City” in Colombo on land reclaimed from the Indian Ocean.

To curtail Chinese expansion across Asia, the US is turning strategically located Sri Lanka into a “military logistics hub” and the center of its “Free and Open Indo-Pacific Region Policy.” Moreover, the US-Japan-Australia-India alliance is seeking to involve Sri Lanka in taking on the Chinese challenge.
"The underlying aim was not to win the war but to use the conflict to create a constant state of destabilized perception in order to manage and control." ― Vladislav Yuryevich Surkov

JFK to 9/11: Everything Is a Rich Man's Trick




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