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https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/131...r-land-spt

Actually a decent article from the Daily Express.

Quote:But historian William Barr told Live Science in 2016 that he thought the base was strictly used for science, and one of about 10 German weather stations on the scattered Arctic islands north of Europe.

Mr Barr said: ”It was quite disastrous — the expedition leader went crazy, and when they were flown out he had to be strapped down to the floor of the aircraft, so he wouldn’t run riot.”

[Image: Archaeologists-uncovered-the-Arctic-weat...591497.jpg]

Cheers
WoW!
Very interesting.
So, the ice and snow has melted and not because of Climate Change, but to the conditions of the 1940's when they built an airstrip and a weather station on the ground.

Sorry, I'm if I had gone off topic.
I still think the discovery is exciting. 
Probably a weather station for their submarine fleet.
 

Definitely a weather station, but for more than the sub fleet.  This was in the days before weather could be easily predicted via satellite photos of fronts moving in a given direction.  Thus, these stations (the Allies had stations as well) were a key strategic asset for determining when military operations should take place.

IIRC, the defense force of Greenland took the highest per capita casualty rates of World War II.  The reason is that they were a small force, and they had some bitter battles with German weather station personnel (who were more militarily oriented than their mission might suggest).

Cheers
A great morning read 5th.  I know there were some horrible places and circumstances in WWII but if I was a soldier in those times I couldn't think of a bleaker posting.

Kind regards,

Bally
(07-28-2020, 07:36 PM)F2d5thCav Wrote: [ -> ] 

Definitely a weather station, but for more than the sub fleet.  This was in the days before weather could be easily predicted via satellite photos of fronts moving in a given direction.  Thus, these stations (the Allies had stations as well) were a key strategic asset for determining when military operations should take place.

IIRC, the defense force of Greenland took the highest per capita casualty rates of World War II.  The reason is that they were a small force, and they had some bitter battles with German weather station personnel (who were more militarily oriented than their mission might suggest).

Cheers

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Ewwww that would be a grim posting. Cold bleak icy territory....In fact sounds like Manchester!!!!. Good find minusculebeercheers Thanks
Great article, thanks for posting this! I can’t even imagine having to live and work in those conditions. No thanks. Judging on the amount of ammunition they found, I think that they were doing more than weather forecasts.
(07-28-2020, 10:28 PM)TheDoctor46 Wrote: [ -> ]Ewwww that would be a grim posting. Cold bleak icy territory....In fact sounds like Manchester!!!!. Good find minusculebeercheers Thanks

smallrofl

Oddly, as someone who loves the cold, and not having many people around me, i'd probably enjoy it!